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In the matter of the Ontario Heritage Act R.S.O. 1990 Chapter 0.18

Notice of intention to designate, City of Toronto, Province of Ontario

230 Bloor Street West: John Lyle Studio Building
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 230 Bloor Street West: John Lyle Studio Building under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 230 Bloor Street West is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. The John Lyle Studio Building (1920) is historically associated with the prominent Canadian architect, and the heritage attributes of the former office/studio building have been identified for incorporation in a residential development on the site.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

51 Bond Street: Metropolitan Church Parsonage
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 51 Bond Street: Metropolitan Church Parsonage under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 51 Bond Street is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. Historically and contextually associated with the neighbouring Metropolitan United Church and funded by the Massey family, the Metropolitan Church Parsonage (1906) is a good example of Neo-Gothic design by Toronto architects Sproatt and Rolph in association with S. G. Curry.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

101 College Street: College Street Wing, Toronto General Hospital
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 101 College Street: College Street Wing, Toronto General Hospital under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 101 College Street is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. A local landmark designed with features of Beaux-Arts Classicism by Toronto architects Darling and Pearson, the College Street Wing of Toronto General Hospital (completed in 1913) is historically associated with medical and surgical innovations and early medical research.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

70 York Street (formerly known as 74-76 York Street): Frederick Crompton Buildings
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 70 York Street (formerly known as 74-76 York Street): Frederick Crompton Buildings under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 70 York Street is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. The Frederick Crompton Buildings (1889) are well-designed examples of late 19th century commercial architecture with Romanesque Revival detailing in Toronto's financial district.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

56 Blue Jays Way: George Crookshank House
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 56 Blue Jays Way: George Crookshank House under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 56 Blue Jays Way is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. The George Crookshank House (circa 1834) is an important surviving example of an early 19th century house form building designed in the Georgian style in the area of Toronto that originated as New Town.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

646 Broadview Avenue: James Harris House
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 646 Broadview Avenue: James Harris House under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 646 Broadview Avenue is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. The James Harris House (1907) is a good example of a house form building designed in the Edwardian Classical style by Toronto architect James L. Havill that anchors the south end of the group of recognized heritage properties on the west side of Broadview Avenue, north of Riverdale Park. The carriage house on the site is included in the Reasons for Designation.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

150 College Street: Fitzgerald Building, University of Toronto
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 150 College Street: Fitzgerald Building, University of Toronto under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 150 College Street is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. Designed in the Georgian Revival style by Toronto architects Mathers and Haldenby for the School of Hygiene, the Fitzgerald Building (1927) is historically associated with innovations in medical education and research, and contributes to the character of College Street as the location of institutional buildings along the south boundary of the University of Toronto campus.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

426 Coxwell Avenue: City Street Cleaning Stables and Office Building
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 426 Coxwell Avenue: City Street Cleaning Stables and Office Building under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 426 Coxwell Avenue is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. Designed by City Architect W. W. Pearse, the City Street Cleaning Stables and Office Building (1919) are landmarks on Coxwell Avenue that were designed in the Period Revival style and successfully converted for residential housing.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

55 Danforth Avenue: Prince Edward Viaduct Public Lavatory
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 55 Danforth Avenue: Prince Edward Viaduct Public Lavatory under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 55 Danforth Avenue is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. Located at the east end of the Prince Edward Viaduct and designed in the Period Revival style by City Architect G. F. W. Price, the Public Lavatory (1921) is significant as the only surviving example of the nine public washrooms constructed by the City of Toronto in the 1920s.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

508 Eastern Avenue: Simcoe Hotel
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 508 Eastern Avenue: Simcoe Hotel under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 508 Eastern Avenue is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. Completed in 1887 for hotelkeeper Charles Ayre, the Simcoe Hotel is a local feature that contributes to the character of the Leslieville neighbourhood.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

8 Elm Street (formerly known as 8-12 Elm Street): James Fleming Buildings
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 8 Elm Street (formerly known as 8-12 Elm Street): James Fleming Buildings under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 8 Elm Street (formerly known as 8-12 Elm Street) is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. The James Fleming Buildings (1890) are commercial buildings with Renaissance Revival detailing that support the character of Elm Street with its collection of late 19th century heritage properties.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

34 Isabella Street: Jared Sessions House
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 34 Isabella Street: Jared Sessions House under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 34 Isabella Street is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. The Jared Sessions House (1860) is a good example of a house form building designed in the Italianate style that contributes to the residential character of Isabella Street, east of Yonge Street.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

61 and 63 Jarvis Street: Clarkson Jones Buildings
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 61 and 63 Jarvis Street: Clarkson Jones Building under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The properties at 61 and 63 Jarvis Street are recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for their cultural heritage value or interest. The Clarkson Jones Buildings (1873) are good examples of late 19th century commercial architecture that contribute to the historical character of the St. Lawrence neighbourhood.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the properties, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

338 Jarvis Street: John Lavelle House
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 338 Jarvis Street: John Lavelle House under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 338 Jarvis Street is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. The John Lavelle House (built in 1865 and altered in 1886) is a well-crafted example of Second Empire detailing applied to a mid-19th century structure that contributes to the historical character of Jarvis Street.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

214 King Street East (formerly known as 204 King Street East and 185 Frederick Street): Adam Brothers Harness Manufacturing Company Building
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 214 King Street East (formerly known as 204 King Street East and 185 Frederick Street): Adam Brothers Harness Manufacturing Company Building under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 214 King Street East (formerly known as 204 King Street East and 185 Frederick Street) is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. Located in the Old Town of York neighbourhood where it anchors the west end of a block with recognized heritage buildings, the Adam Brothers Harness Manufacturing Company Building (1903) is a good example of Renaissance Revival design by Toronto architect George M. Miller.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

44 King Street West: Bank of Nova Scotia Building
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 44 King Street West: Bank of Nova Scotia Building under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 44 King Street West is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. The Bank of Nova Scotia Building (completed 1951) was originally designed by noted Toronto architect John M. Lyle and executed by architects Mathers and Haldenby in association with Beck and Eadie. A landmark in Toronto's financial district, the skyscraper is an excellent example of Modern Classicism featuring a sculptural program by Frederick Winkler and Jacobine Jones.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

214 King Street East: W. A. Drummond and Company Dairy Supply Warehouse
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 214 King Street East: W. A. Drummond and Company Dairy Supply Warehouse under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 214 King Street East is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. Located in the Old Town of York neighbourhood where it anchors the east end of a block with recognized heritage buildings, the W. A. Drummond and Company Dairy Supply Warehouse (1911) is a good example of Renaissance Revival design by Toronto architect S. A. Waggett.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

40 King Street West (formerly located at 36 King Street West and now located at 11 Adelaide Street West): John McKay Store
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 40 King Street West (formerly located at 36 King Street West and now located at 11 Adelaide Street West): John McKay Store under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 40 King Street West (formerly located at 36 King Street West and now located at 11 Adelaide Street West) is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. An excellent example of late 19th century commercial design by Toronto architect S. G. Curry in the Renaissance Revival style with terra cotta detailing, the façade of the John McKay Store (1898) was relocated to the current site in the 1980s.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

214 King Street West: Canadian General Electric Building
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 214 King Street West: Canadian General Electric Building under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 214 King Street West is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. Designed by Toronto architects Burke, Horwood and White, the Canadian General Electric Building (completed in two sections in 1917 and 1919) is an early 20th century warehouse with Classical detailing that is associated with the development of the King-Spadina area as Toronto's industrial sector.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

833 King Street West: Charles Hansen Canadian Laboratory
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 833 King Street West: Charles Hansen Canadian Laboratory under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 833 King Street West is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. Designed by architect E. L. Sheppard and overlooking Stanley Park, the Charles Hansen Canadian Laboratory (1934) is a small-scale industrial building blending Art Moderne and Art Deco features.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

915 King Street West: Massey-Harris Office Building
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 915 King Street West: Massey-Harris Office Building under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 915 King Street West is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. Associated with Toronto architects E. J. Lennox and George M. Miller, the Massey-Harris Office Building (designed in stages beginning in 1885) is the last surviving building from the industrial complex along King Street West, west of Strachan Avenue, developed by the Massey family for its internationally recognized agricultural implements company.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

56 Queen Street East: Metropolitan United Church
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 56 Queen Street East: Metropolitan United Church under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 56 Queen Street East is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. As a landmark in Toronto, Metropolitan United Church (rebuilt in 1928 and incorporating portions of the earlier church) is significant for its design and craftsmanship with Gothic-inspired detailing, its role as an important historical institution, and its association with Toronto architects Henry Langley and J. Gibb Morton.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

2 Queen Street West: Philip Jamieson Building
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 2 Queen Street West: Philip Jamieson Building under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 2 Queen Street West is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. One of the few buildings in Toronto designed by the architectural partnership of Curry and Baker, the Philip Jamieson Building (1896) is an important example of a late 19th century commercial building with Classical features in the City's financial district.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

145 Queen's Quay West: Toronto Ferry Company Waiting Room
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 145 Queen's Quay West: Toronto Ferry Company Waiting Room under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 145 Queen's Quay West is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. The Toronto Ferry Company Waiting Room (constructed in 1907 and moved to its present location in 1989) is a surviving example of a building constructed for a harbour-oriented use on the Central Waterfront.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

363 Sorauren Avenue: Robert Watson Factory
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 363 Sorauren Avenue: Robert Watson Factory under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 363 Sorauren Avenue is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. Constructed for a candy manufacturer on a highly visible site near Dundas Street West and the railway corridor, the Robert Watson Factory (1907) is a good example of Edwardian Classicism applied to an early 20th century industrial building.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

100 Spadina Road: Spadina Road Apartments
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 100 Spadina Road: Spadina Road Apartments under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 100 Spadina Road is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. A feature on Spadina Road north of Bloor Street West, the Spadina Road Apartments (1969) is an important example of a late 20th century apartment building featuring the unique Modern design associated with architect Uno Prii.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

73 St. George Street: Sir Daniel Wilson Residence, University College
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 73 St. George Street: Sir Daniel Wilson Residence, University College under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 73 St. George Street is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. Originally housing male students at University College, the Sir Daniel Wilson Residence (1954) is a good example of 20th century Georgian Revival design by Toronto architects Mathers and Haldenby that is important in context with the neighbouring buildings on the University of Toronto campus.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

150 St. George Street: William Crowther House
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 150 St. George Street: William Crowther House under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 150 St. George Street is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. Designed in the Queen Anne Revival style and later converted for institutional uses, the house form building (1889) reflects the evolution of St. George Street, south of Bloor Street West, from a residential enclave to a major corridor through the University of Toronto campus. The heritage attributes of the adjoining South Wing (1960) are included in the Reasons for Designation.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

234 St. George Street: Robert Watson House
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 234 St. George Street: Robert Watson House under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 234 St. George Street is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. The Robert Watson House (1903) is a well-designed example of the Queen Anne Revival style by Toronto architect E. J. Lennox that supports the residential character of the Annex neighbourhood.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

2 Strachan Avenue (also known as 160 Princes' Boulevard): Hockey and Sports Halls of Fame
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 2 Strachan Avenue (also known as 160 Princes' Boulevard): Hockey and Sports Halls of Fame under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 2 Strachan Avenue (also known as 160 Princes' Boulevard) is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. Designed by Toronto architects Allward and Gouinlock, the Hockey and Sports Halls of Fame Building (dating to 1961 and 1966-67) contributes to the evolution of Exhibition Place where the heritage attributes of the building have been incorporated in the redevelopment of the site.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

384 Sunnyside Avenue: Howard Park Methodist Church
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 384 Sunnyside Avenue: Howard Park Methodist Church under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 384 Sunnyside Avenue is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. With its location on a corner lot in the Sunnyside neighbourhood, Howard Park Methodist Church (Sunday School 1910 and Sanctuary 1915) is a good example of Neo-Gothic design and historically associated with the development of the community.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

297 Victoria Street: O'Keefe House
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 297 Victoria Street: O'Keefe House under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 297 Victoria Street is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. Designed by Toronto architects Chapman and Oxley for the offices of the O'Keefe Brewing Company Limited, O'Keefe House (1940-1941) is a good example of Modern Classicism and a feature at Ryerson University.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

436 Wellington Street West: Monarch Building
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 436 Wellington Street West: Monarch Building under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 436 Wellington Street West is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. Designed by Toronto architect C. J. Gibson, the Monarch Building (1915) is a good example of an early 20th century warehouse that forms part of an important collection of industrial buildings along Wellington Street West in the King-Spadina neighbourhood.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

40 Westmoreland Avenue: Church of St. Mary the Virgin and St. Cyprian
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 40 Westmoreland Avenue: Church of St. Mary the Virgin and St. Cyprian under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 40 Westmoreland Avenue is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. An institution of historical importance to the community that involved the amalgamation of two Anglican congregations, the Church of St. Mary the Virgin and St. Cyprian (1914) is a local landmark with its Neo-Gothic design by Toronto architect W. A. Langton.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

76 Wychwood Avenue: Wychwood Car Barns
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 76 Wychwood Avenue: Wychwood Car Barns under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 76 Wychwood Avenue is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. The Wychwood Car Barns (constructed between 1913 and 1921) form a complex of four adjoining barns for streetcars that are surviving buildings associated with the origins of vehicular transportation in the City of Toronto.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

104 Yonge Street (formerly known as 102 Yonge Street): Upper Canada Bible and Tract Societies Building
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 104 Yonge Street (formerly known as 102 Yonge Street): Upper Canada Bible and Tract Societies Building under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 104 Yonge Street (formerly known as 102 Yonge Street) is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. The Upper Canada Tract Societies Building (1886) is a surviving example of a late 19th century commercial building associated with the historical evolution of Yonge Street. Designed by Toronto architects Gordon and Helliwell, with Second Empire features added in 1910 by Burke, Horwood and White, the façade is incorporated into the commercial complex at the east end of Scotia Plaza.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

1050-1052 Yonge Street (formerly known as 1046 Yonge Street): Crescent Road Apartments
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 1050-1052 Yonge Street (formerly known as 1046 Yonge Street): Crescent Road Apartments Building under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The properties at 1050-1052 Yonge Street (formerly known as 1046 Yonge Street) are recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for their cultural heritage value or interest. A landmark on Yonge Street, the Crescent Road Apartments (1927) were designed by Toronto architect Charles Dolphin as a well-crafted luxury apartment complex with elaborate Classical detailing.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

2270 Gerrard Street East (formerly known as 2276 Gerrard Street East): Lake Simcoe Ice Company Office Building
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 2270 Gerrard Street East (formerly known as 2276 Gerrard Street East): Lake Simcoe Ice Company Office Building under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 2270 Gerrard Street East (formerly known as 2276 Gerrard Street East) is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. The Lake Simcoe Ice Company Office Building (1923-24) is historically associated with the development of East Toronto, and its heritage attributes have been incorporated into a residential development on the site.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

32 Grenville Street: F. J. Hartz Company Factory
Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 32 Grenville Street: F. J. Hartz Company Factory under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 32 Grenville Street is recommended for designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value or interest. Designed by Toronto architect J. Francis Brown for the manufacturers of surgical instruments and pharmaceuticals, the F. J. Hartz Company Factory (1929) is a good example of Neo-Gothic design applied to an industrial building.

The Reasons for Designation, including a description of the heritage attributes of the property, are available for viewing form the City Clerk's Division or from Heritage Preservation Services, Policy and Research Section, City Planning Division, City of Toronto.

Notice of an objection to the proposed designations may be served on the City Clerk, Attention: Christine Archibald, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 12th floor, Toronto, ON, M5H 2N2, within thirty days of the 7th of August, 2007, which is September 7th, 2007. The notice must set out the reason(s) for the objection, and all relevant facts.

Dated at Toronto this 7th day of August, 2007.

Ulli S. Watkiss
City Clerk

 

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