Notice: Due to COVID-19, Dangerous Dog Review Tribunal hearings are suspended.


To report a dog that has bitten or attacked or posing a menace to a person or domestic animal contact 311 to submit a service request for Animal Services to investigate.

Note: Animal Services only has the authority to investigate dog and coyote bites only.

Dog running at large = a dog off the premises of the owner and not in the care and control of a person.

All animal to human bites or scratches must also be reported to Public Health, please see the solution below for Public Health reporting.

Dangerous dogs Toronto Municipal Code, Chapter 349 defines a dangerous act as any bite, attack, act of menacing behaviour (injures or threatens a human without biting them) or a combination of the above.

Chapter 349, Animals defines a dangerous dog as:

  • A dog that has severely bitten a person or domestic animal (pet)
  • A dog that has bitten or attacked a person or domestic animal (pet) and it is the second bite or attack on record
  • A dog that has injured or threatened a human
  • A dog that is the subject of a muzzle or control order

What happens if a dog bites, attacks or engages in a dangerous act?

  • If the dangerous act is the first on record with the City, the owner will be served with a written warning
  • If the dangerous act is the second or subsequent on record with the City or is determined to be severe, a dog can be deemed to be a dangerous dog
  • If the dog is under a muzzle or notice of caution order, and a bite occurs, the Animal Care and Control Officer can determine the dog to be a dangerous dog
  • Before a dog is deemed dangerous, an investigation will occur to determine if the dog was acting in self-defence.

If a dog is deemed to be a dangerous dog, the owner must adhere to the following requirements:

  • Muzzle, leash and maintain control of the dog at all times when off the premises of the owner.
  • Ensure the dog is wearing a dangerous dog tag at all times.
  • Prohibit the dog from entering into a designated leash-free area of a City park.
  • Post a warning sign on the owner's property.
  • Obtain training for the dog.

Related information: