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City Council has directed the Clerk to hold a by-election for filling the vacancy of Councillor Ward 22 Scarborough-Agincourt. The by-election will be held on Friday, January 15, 2021 with the opportunity of Advance Voting on January 8 to 10, 2021.

Find out how to become a candidate in the Councillor, Ward 22 by-election and things you should know when running a campaign.

Key Forms & Dates

Contact Information

If a person wishes to run as a candidate in the City of Toronto Councillor, Ward 22 by-election, they must file a nomination paper with the City Clerk. The first day to file a nomination paper will be October 29, 2020.

A person cannot raise or spend money on their election campaign until they have filed the nomination paper.

Nomination Period

Nomination papers can be filed Monday to Friday between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. beginning on Thursday, October 29 at the Election Services Office at 89 Northline Road. The last day to file a nomination paper is Tuesday, December 1 between the hours of 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Filing a Nomination

Nominations must be filed in-person at the Election Services Office at 89 Northline Road, as original signatures are required.

To file a nomination, the following must be provided:

  • Completed Nomination Paper
  • At least 25 declarations of endorsement (on the required form)
  • Current acceptable identification (see Acceptable Identification for Candidates section)
  • $100 nomination filing fee (paid by cash, credit card, debit card, or certified cheque or money order payable to ‘Treasurer, City of Toronto’)
    • Filing fees are refunded to candidates if they file the required financial statement(s) (see Financial Filing Requirements for Candidates section)

If an agent is filing the Nomination Paper on your behalf, the agent must provide the above documents as well as their own identification.

Qualifications and Identification for Councillor

To run for city councillor, on the day the nomination paper is filed, a person must be:

  • A Canadian citizen
  • At least 18 years of age
  • A resident of the City of Toronto, or
  • An owner or tenant of land in the City of Toronto, or the spouse of the owner or tenant
  • Not legally prohibited from voting
  • Not disqualified by any legislation from holding municipal office

Acceptable identification  must be provided when filing a nomination paper. (see Acceptable Identification for Candidates section)

Who cannot be a councillor candidate

The following people are disqualified from being elected as a member of council, or from holding office as a member of council:

  • A judge of any court
  • A member of the Provincial Legislature, the Federal House of Commons or Senate who has not resigned from their office by the close of nominations. Proof of resignation must be provided by the close of nominations or the Clerk will not certify the nomination
  • A candidate who failed to file the necessary financial statement or exceeded the prescribed spending limit(s) in the last municipal election

City of Toronto employees

  • Employees of the City of Toronto who wish to run for councillor must take an unpaid leave of absence before filing a nomination paper.
  • The employee must provide a copy of the documentation showing that they have taken the leave of absence and the effective date.

Withdrawing a Nomination

If you no longer wish to run in the by-election as Councillor, Ward 22, you must file a Withdrawal of Nomination form in-person before 2 p.m., Tuesday, December 1, 2020.

Candidates who have withdrawn their nomination are still required to file a financial statement. (see Financial Filing Requirements for Candidates section on this page)

Candidates filing a nomination must present acceptable identification showing namequalifying Toronto address and signature.  This can be one piece of ID or a combination of two pieces of ID.

One piece of ID showing name, qualifying Toronto address and signature:

  • Ontario driver’s licence
  • Ontario Health Card (photo card with address)
  • Ontario motor vehicle permit (plate portion)
  • Cancelled personalized cheque
  • Mortgage, lease or rental agreement
  • Insurance policy
  • Loan or financial agreement with a financial institution
  • Document issued or certified by a court in Ontario
  • Any other document from the government of Canada, Ontario or a municipality in Ontario or from an agency of such a government
  • Any document from a Band Council in Ontario established under the Indian Act (Canada)

OR

Two pieces of ID:

First piece of ID showing name and signature:

  • Ontario driver’s licence
  • Ontario Health Card
  • Ontario motor vehicle permit (plate portion)
  • Canadian passport
  • Certificate of Canadian Citizenship
  • Certificate of Indian Status
  • Veterans Affairs Canada Health Card
  • Social Insurance Number Card
  • Old Age Security Card
  • Credit card
  • Debit card
  • Employee Identification card
  • Student Identification card issued by a post-secondary institution
  • Union Identification card or professional licence card
  • Cancelled personalized cheque
  • Mortgage, lease or rental agreement for property in Ontario
  • Insurance policy
  • Document issued or certified by a court in Ontario
  • Any other document issued by the government of Canada, Ontario or a municipality in Ontario or from an agency of such a government
  • Any document from a Band Council in Ontario established under the Indian Act (Canada)

Second piece of ID showing name and qualifying Toronto address:

  • Ontario motor vehicle permit (vehicle portion)
  • Income tax assessment notice
  • Child Tax Benefit Statement
  • Statement of Employment Insurance Benefits Paid T4E
  • Statement of Old Age Security T4A (OAS)
  • Statement of Canada Pension Plan Benefits T4A (P)
  • Canada Pension Plan Statement of Contributions
  • Statement of Direct Deposit for Ontario Works
  • Statement of Direct Deposit for Ontario Disability Support Program
  • Workplace Safety and Insurance Board Statement of Benefits T5007
  • Property tax assessment
  • Insurance statement
  • Mortgage, lease or rental statement for property in Ontario
  • Credit card, bank account, RRSP, RRIF, RHOSP or T5 statement
  • CNIB Card or a card from another registered charitable organization which provides services to persons with disabilities
  • Hospital card or record
  • Document showing campus residence issued by the office or officials responsible for student residence at a post-secondary institution
  • Utility bill for hydro, water, gas, telephone or cable TV or a bill from a  public utilities commission
  • Cheque stub, T4 or pay receipt issued by an employer
  • Transcript or report card from a post-secondary school
  • Document issued or certified by a court in Ontario
  • Any other document issued by the government of Canada, Ontario or a municipality in Ontario or from an agency of such a government
  • Any document from a Band Council in Ontario established under the Indian Act (Canada)

Opening a Campaign Bank Account

Before spending any money or accepting any contributions, you must visit a financial institution to open a bank account for your campaign.

All contributions must be deposited into your campaign account and all expenses must be paid from your campaign account. Do not use your personal bank account for campaign purposes.

When opening your bank account, present the financial institution with a copy of your Nomination Paper and the Letter to Banks. Unlike in Provincial or Federal elections, you are not required to have additional signing authority or a Chief Financial Officer.

You do not need to open a bank account if you do not accept any contributions or spend any money on your campaign.

Note: the nomination filing fee is considered a personal expense and not a campaign expense.

Spending Limits

All candidates running in the Councillor, Ward 22 by-election are subject to limits on the amount of money they can spend on their campaign.

  • The preliminary spending limit for Ward 22 candidates is $61,207.95
  • A final spending limit will be provided to candidates on December 8, 2020

Contribution Limits

There are limits to the amount of money that contributors can give to candidates. Candidates should make sure their contributors are aware of these contribution limits.

  • A contributor cannot contribute more than $1,200 to an individual candidate.
  • A contributor cannot contribute more than a combined total of $5,000 to multiple candidates running in the Ward 22 by-election.

There is also “self-funding” limit that limits the amount of money a candidate and their spouse combined can contribute to the candidate’s own campaign.

  • The preliminary self-funding limit for Ward 22 candidates is $18,225.40
  • A final self-funding limit will be provided to candidates on December 8, 2020

MyCampaign and the Electronic Financial Filing System

Candidates have access to a portal called MyCampaign that allows them to access campaign information, digital copies of the ward map, a list of voting places, and the voters’ list. Candidates can also provide contact information through MyCampaign that will be posted on the City’s website.

The Electronic Financial Filing System (EFFS) is a system that allows candidates to input and track all contributions and expenses. The system will provide a contribution receipt and will produce the financial statement. An EFFS manual is available in MyCampaign.

Contribution Rebate Program

Candidates have the option of participating in the City of Toronto’s Contribution Rebate Program, which gives contributors who meet certain criteria a partial rebate on their contributions. For more information, please visit the Contribution Rebate page.

Election Signs

Election signs and campaign office signs are subject to rules under the City’s Election Sign By-law and the Municipal Elections Act, 1996.

For information about when, where and how signs may be displayed, visit the Municipal Licencing and Standards web page Election Signs and the quick reference guide on Election Sign Placement.

For candidate who have questions relating to election signs:

For election sign complaints, call 311.

Campaign Advertising

The Municipal Elections Act, 1996 set out rules for candidates relating to campaign advertisements in the municipal election or by-election.

A candidate advertisement is a message in any medium (e.g., broadcast, print or electronic) that a candidate purchases or directs to promote or support their election. Related rules include that:

  • advertisements must identify the candidate
  • candidates must provide the broadcaster or publisher of the advertisement with their name as well as the name, business address and phone number of the person dealing with the broadcaster or publisher on their behalf

Canvassing at Voting Places

s48 of the Municipal Elections Act, 1996

The City Clerk determines what locations will be used as voting places. On voting days, canvassing of any nature is not permitted in or on these premises, including the entire building and the property on which it is located.

The Municipal Elections Act, 1996 provides that while an elector is in a voting place, no one shall attempt, directly or indirectly, to influence how the elector votes and that no one shall display a candidate’s campaign material or literature in a voting place.

Access to Apartments, Condos and other Buildings

By law, candidates and their representatives are allowed access to apartments, condominiums, non-profit housing cooperatives and gated communities for the purpose of canvassing and distributing election material.

The Municipal Elections Act outlines the following rules around campaigning in these locations:

  • candidates and their representations are permitted access between the hours of 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • no landlord of residential premises can prevent a tenant from displaying signs on their rented premises
  • no condominium corporation can prevent an owner or tenant from displaying signs on their unit
  • the landlord, person, condominium corporation or agent may set reasonable conditions on the size or type of sign that can be displayed. They can restrict signs from being displayed in common areas

The Residential Tenancies Act, 2006 (s.28), Condominium Act, 1998 (s.118) and the Co-operative Corporations Act, 1996 (s.171.24) provides candidates and their representatives access to the building for the purpose of canvassing.

The letter to landlords, property managers and house co-op representatives provides the above mentioned legislative sections. Candidate may use this letter when they are canvassing.

Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) premises

Candidates may campaign in subway stations, but outside the fare-paid areas.  They may also campaign outside TTC station entrances and at bus and streetcar stops.  Candidates can also hold news conferences outside TTC stations provided access and egress for TTC customers and TTC vehicles is maintained and safety is not compromised.

Candidates may not campaign on TTC vehicles, on subway platforms on in any area where a fare is required. Candidates are also not allowed to erect signs unless through paid advertising.

Refer to the TTC’s website on canvassing on TTC property and the policy for the Use of TTC Resources during an Election for relevant information. If candidates have questions regarding the TTC policy they should contact the Toronto Transit Commission directly.

Use of City Symbols and Logo

Candidates are prohibited from using the City of Toronto’s logo, graphics or any other item of City intellectual property for any campaign-related purposes or materials including, but not limited to, signs, printed and electronic publications, flyers, brochures, e-mail, website, business cards, postcards, letterheads, leaflets, posters, fridge magnets and promotional items.

City of Toronto Resources

The City of Toronto policy on Use of City Resources during an Election Period provides direction on how City resources can and cannot be used during municipal, school board, provincial and federal election campaigns or campaigns on a question on a ballot. The policy states that:

  • City facilities and City infrastructure may not be used for any election-related purpose by a candidate
  • candidates may not distribute campaign materials on or in City facilities or at City events
  • candidates are permitted to distribute campaign materials on public right of way sidewalks and thoroughfares, during all-candidates meetings, at public parks and at the following City managed public squares: Nathan Phillips Square, Mel Lastman Square, Albert Campbell Square and David Pecaut Square

This policy does not apply to library facilities.  Candidates should contact the Toronto Public Library directly for booking prices and availability.

Privacy and Personal Information

It is the responsibility of the candidate to protect any personal information collected for the purpose of filing election forms (eg. Financial Statement, Endorsement of Nomination Form, and/or Contribution Rebate Application), until such time the forms are filed with the City Clerk.

Once filed, documents and materials submitted to the City Clerk are subject to access and privacy provisions under the Municipal Elections Act, 1996 and other applicable legislation.

Candidates & Scrutineer Rules

s16, 47, 48 and 49 of the Municipal Elections Act, 1996

Appointment

Candidates may appoint a scrutineer by completing the Notice of Scrutineer Appointment form. Once completed, the scrutineer must present it to the voting place staff.

At the voting place, a candidate is permitted one scrutineer for each ballot issuing station and one at the vote tabulator. If the candidate enters the voting place, they are considered to be a scrutineer and must present identification to the election official. If the candidate has the maximum number of scrutineers in a voting place, one scrutineer must leave in order for the candidate to enter the location.

Note:

In order to protect the secrecy of the vote, scrutineers will not be permitted to view the ballots as they are being fed into the vote tabulator when a voter is casting their ballot.

Candidates will have access to the number of scrutineers allowed in each voting place through MyCampaign.

Any candidate who has been acclaimed is prohibited from being in the voting place unless another candidate has appointed them as a scrutineer.

Rights

Candidates and scrutineers have a number of rights, including the following:

  • they may enter the voting place 15 minutes before it opens to visually inspect the vote tabulator, vote tabulator stand, the Voter Assist Terminal (where applicable), the ballots and all other election documents but not so as to delay the opening of the voting place
  • they may object to an elector they believe is not qualified to vote (objection to be decided by the election official)
  • they may sign the statement of results after the close of polls on election night
  • they may place their seal on the ballot box after the close of voting on each advance vote day and on election day

Restrictions

Candidates and scrutineers are prohibited from the following:

  • attempting, directly or indirectly, to interfere with how an elector votes
  • displaying a candidate’s election material (including buttons, pins, ribbons, etc.) in the voting place
  • compromising the secrecy of voting
  • interfering or attempting to interfere with an elector who is marking a ballot
  • obtaining or attempting to obtain, in the voting place, any information about how an elector intended to vote or has voted
  • communicating any information obtained at a voting place about how an elector intends to vote or has voted

The role of candidates and scrutineers in the voting place is to observe the integrity of the process, not to assist electors. Candidates and scrutineers cannot:

  • speak to any electors
  • act as an interpreter (electors must make their own arrangements)
  • provide assistance to an elector
  • use a cell phone in the voting place..

Election officials have the right to remove from the voting place any individual who is causing a disturbance. Candidates and scrutineers forfeit their right to be present if they disrupt the voting place or interfere with the voting process.

View the full list of election related by-laws, legislation, policies and procedures.

Campaign Period

Initial Campaign Period

The campaign period begins on the day the candidate files their nomination paper and ends on March 1, 2021. A candidate cannot raise or spend any money after this date unless they file a Notice of Extension of Campaign Period – Form 6 to extend their campaign.

Extended/Supplementary Campaign Period

Candidates who believe they will have a deficit can file a Notice of Extension of Campaign Period – Form 6 by 4:30 p.m. on March 1, 2021 to extend their campaign to September 1, 2021 in order to continue raising money.

Candidates who extend their campaign must file two financial statements: an initial statement and a supplementary statement.

If a candidate’s initial filing is accompanied by an Auditor’s Report, their supplementary filing must have a new Auditor’s Report attached (see Auditor’s Report section).

Financial Filing Requirements and Deadlines

All candidates must file an initial financial statement by 2 p.m. on March 31, 2021

  • This statement details all campaign finances from the day the nomination was filed until March 1, 2021

Candidates who submitted a Notice of Extension of Campaign Period – Form 6 to extend their campaign must also file a supplementary financial statement by 2 p.m. on October 1, 2021

  • This supplementary statement details all campaign finances from the day the nomination was filed until September 1, 2021

Candidates who miss a filing deadline can still submit their statement up to 30 days later provided that they pay a $500 late filing fee.

Auditor’s Report

An auditor’s report must be attached to the financial statement at the time of filing if a candidate:

  • Raised or spent more than $10,000 on their campaign; or
  • Is participating in the Contribution Rebate Program (no matter how much money was raised or spent).

The auditor must be licensed under the Public Accounting Act, 2004.

Campaign Surplus

If a candidate’s campaign has a surplus remaining after any contributions from themselves and their spouse have been refunded, the surplus must be paid to the City Clerk when the financial statement is filed.

The surplus can be paid via cash, certified cheque or money order payable to ‘Treasurer, City of Toronto’.

Correcting Errors on a Financial Statement

Candidates who submit a financial statement and later identify an error may withdraw their original statement and submit a new one by 2 p.m. on the filing deadline date.

If the withdrawn financial statement was accompanied by an auditor’s report, the corrected financial statement must be accompanied by a new/updated auditor’s report.

If the corrected financial statement identifies an additional surplus amount, the difference must be paid to the City Clerk at the time the corrected financial statement is filed. If the surplus amount is lower, the City Clerk will remit any difference owing with interest.

Penalties

Under the Municipal Elections Act, 1996, an individual will not be eligible to run as a candidate in any municipal Election in the Province of Ontario, or be appointed to office, until after the 2022 municipal, if:

  • They fail to file a financial statement by the end of the 30-day grace period, or fail to apply to the court for an extension by the filing deadline.
  • The filed financial statement shows that they have exceeded a spending limit.
  • They fail to turn over their surplus to the City Clerk when they file their financial statement.

Other penalties are listed in sections 88.23 and 92 of the Municipal Elections Act, 1996.

The City Clerk’s Office requires payment for certain election-related purposes, including but not limited to:

  • filing a nomination to become a candidate
  • paying surplus funds to the clerk at the time of financial filing
  • purchasing other goods and services (for example printable ward maps)

The following payment methods will be accepted:

  • cash
  • credit card (VISA, MasterCard and American Express)
  • debit card
  • certified cheque
  • money order
  • bank draft

Please note: Certified cheques, money orders and bank drafts must be payable to: the Treasurer, City of Toronto

The candidates listed below are in default of the Municipal Elections Act, 1996. This means that they cannot run or be appointed to any municipal office until after the next general election.

Last Name/Single Name First Name Reason for Default
Abdulle Zakaria Did not file required financial statement
Baeta Julien Did not file required financial statement
Balashi Ejona Did not file required financial statement
Barber Reade Did not file required financial statement
Bell George Did not file required financial statement
Bent Headley Did not file required financial statement
Bottoni Patrizia Did not file required financial statement
Bowie Tracy Did not file required financial statement
Bucao Randy Did not file required financial statement
Carapinha Joey Did not file required financial statement
Carvalho Jason Did not file required financial statement
Charles Kristy-Ann Did not file required financial statement
Clarke DeiJaumar Did not file required financial statement
D’Gama Peter Did not file required financial statement
Dhawan Ankit Did not file required financial statement
Edwards Nichole Did not file required financial statement
Figliano Matteo Did not file required financial statement
Fosu Fred Did not file required financial statement
Game Jon Did not file required financial statement
Gharibi Kasra Did not file required financial statement
Gikas George Did not file required financial statement
Gomez-Carty Antuanette Did not file required financial statement
Hargoe Moby Did not file required financial statement
Ho Simon Did not file required financial statement
Karygiannis Jim Exceeded expense limit
Keshinro Adeleke Did not file required financial statement
Khan Ismail Did not file required financial statement
Khogali Ali Walied Did not file required financial statement
Khoshdel Reza Did not file required financial statement
Kulish Taras Did not file required financial statement
Kung Fan Hsin Did not file required financial statement
Lazopoulos Gus Did not file required financial statement
Lee John Did not file required financial statement
Lee Vincent Did not file required financial statement
MacCallum Joel Did not file required financial statement
Mann Nahum Did not file required financial statement
McGuigan Robert Did not file required financial statement
McMillan Jim Did not file required financial statement
Mitchell Crystal Did not file required financial statement
Morris Noah Did not file required financial statement
Murton Paul Did not pay $500 late filing fee
Ogilvie Cedric Did not file required financial statement
Okalowe Mercy Did not file required financial statement
Omer Hashi Kowser Did not file required financial statement
Pampena Joseph Did not file required financial statement
Pena Alexander Did not file required financial statement
Rahman Russell Did not file required financial statement
Riley Christopher Did not file required financial statement
Rooney Matthew Did not file required financial statement
Sist Randy Did not file required financial statement
Spencer Michelle Did not file required financial statement
Syed Alam Did not file required financial statement
Syed Md Iftakhar Did not file required financial statement
Ullah Obaid Did not file required financial statement
Wilson Hamish Did not file required financial statement
Wolvin Rob Did not file required financial statement
Zaretsky Edward Did not file required financial statement