To ensure the interests of the City are met and to adequately assess the technical aspects of your proposal, the City requires submission of a number of information items with your application. This page provides definitions and detailed descriptions of the plans, reports and studies the City may require in order to assess development proposals and the completeness of development applications.

Please note that not all of these requirements will apply to your proposal and that the level of detail required for these reports and studies varies widely. Your pre-application consultation meeting will determine the requirement for, and scope of, any plans, reports and studies that must be provided with your initial submission to consider your application complete.

Terms of Reference are being prepared for the following reports/studies. In the interim, the requirements and details of these plans/reports/studies, should you need one, can be addressed during your pre-application consultation meeting.

  • Accessibility Design Standards Checklist
  • Construction Management Plan
  • Draft Zoning By-law Amendment (text and schedule)
  • Environmental Impact Study
  • Erosion/Sediment Control Plan

A sample board of select exterior materials may be requested during development review.

Scale

  • 1:50 metric scale

General Details

  • Full colour
  • A minimum building width of three typical bays, including the main building entrance, for the first three-storeys
  • Label exterior design features, exterior materials and window type (e.g. vision glass, spandrel)
  • (For new buildings 1,000 square metres or greater) Show location of signage as part of recognition of the Architect of Record, or primary Design Architect of the building. The lettering for this recognition must cover an area of at least 0.2m by 0.3m, or 0.06 square metres located near the main entrance or prominent façade of the structure.
  • Fenestration patterns and treatment on the first 10 to 12 metres to reduce bird collisions – see Bird-Friendly Development Guidelines for additional information.

Terms of Reference are being prepared for this study. In the interim, the requirements and details of this study should you need one can be addressed during your pre-application consultation meeting.

Alternately, please refer to the City of Toronto Accessibility Design Guidelines.

Description

A technical document that provides detailed information about individual trees and associated significant vegetation (i.e., shrubs) on private and public lands (such as the boulevard) that are affected by an application. The report identifies tree care methodology and details specific treatments required to protect and to preserve trees before, during and after construction on a site (including, but not limited to, the provision of required space for tree roots and crowns to develop and grow to maturity).

When Required

An Arborist/Tree Preservation Report is required for the following application types:

  • Zoning By-law Amendment
  • Plans of Subdivision
  • Plans of Condominium
  • Site Plan Control
  • Consent and/or Minor Variance applications

The Arborist/Tree Preservation Report is required on private and public lands as affected by the proposal. A certified tree expert should prepare the report. A certified tree expert generally includes:

  • An Arborist qualified by the Ontario Training and Adjustment Board (OTAB) or the Ministry of Colleges and Universities
  • A Certified Arborist qualified by the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA)
  • A Consulting Arborist registered with the American Society of Consulting Arborists (ASCA)
  • A Registered Professional Forester (RPF)

The Commissioner of Economic Development, Culture and Tourism may approve other individuals with similar qualifications when requested.

In instances where there are no trees involved with the application, the “Arborist Report for Development Applications” form must be submitted with the appropriate declaration section completed.

Rationale

The Arborist/Tree Preservation Report guides the development of a Tree Preservation Plan (which should be submitted concurrently). The authority for these works is in the City’s Street Tree, Ravine Protection and Private Tree By-laws, the City’s Environmental Plan and Section 3.4, Policy 1 (d) iii) of the City’s Official Plan.

Required Contents

An Arborist/Tree Preservation Report must include the following basic information:

  1. Details of the existing tree species, size and condition.
  2. Details of any associated significant vegetation worthy of protection.
  3. Recommendations for tree protection.
  4. Details of preservation measures (during and after construction) and tree protection plan for all trees that are to be retained on site.
  5. Details of all trees intended for removal.
  6. Details of tree pruning (crown and roots).
  7. Appraised value of City owned trees that are affected by the application. This valuation to be based on the current edition of the “Council of Tree and Landscape Appraisers Guide to Plant Appraisal” as endorsed by the International Society of Arboriculture.
  8. Maintenance plan for newly planted trees, including information on the proposed volume of soil to be provided for these trees.
  9. Schedule for site inspection and status reporting to the City by qualified tree experts throughout construction.

The Arborist Report For Development Applications form must be filled out and submitted with all development applications.

Description

An archaeological resource assessment identifies and evaluates the presence of archaeological resources also known as archaeological sites. Archaeological resources or sites include the physical remains and contextual setting of any structure, event, place, feature, or object which, because of the passage of time, is on or below the surface of the land or water, and is important to understanding the history of a people or place.

Since 2004 the City of Toronto, Heritage Preservation Services (HPS), has been developing an archaeological management plan (AMP) to govern when archaeological assessments are required within City lands. This planning tool is a predictive model and provides information on which lands are likely to contain archaeological resources and should be subject to an assessment.

When Required

An archaeological  assessment is required for the following application types if the property is on the City’s database of lands containing archaeological potential:

  • Official Plan Amendment
  • Zoning By-law Amendment
  • Plans of Subdivision
  • Site Plan Control
  • Consent and/or Minor Variance applications

Whether a property has archaeological resource potential can be confirmed at the searchable database TO maps. Use the map’s legend and activate the archaeological potential tab to search property addresses directly.

An archaeological assessment may also be required if a property is identified on the City of Toronto’s Inventory of Heritage Properties as part of the Heritage Impact Assessment process (See terms of reference for Heritage Impact Assessments).

Rationale

An archaeological assessment is required on lands that hold archaeological potential in order to ascertain the presence or absence of archaeological resources. If these resources are present, the archaeological assessment will evaluate the significance of these resources and outline measures to mitigate the impact of development on these resources. Mitigation measures include on-site preservation and avoidance of the archaeological site entirely, as per the City of Toronto’s Official Plan, 10 (b), or alternatively the site is subject to full documentation and removal.

The archaeological assessment will inform the review of an application by City Planning staff. The rationale for the requirement to provide an archaeological assessment is based on the findings of the City of Toronto’s archaeological management plan together with the legislative authority stemming from: the Ontario Heritage Act, Section 2 (d) of the Planning Act, Section 2.6.3 of the Provincial Policy Statement (2005), Section 3.1.5 Heritage Resources of the City of Toronto’s Official Plan, the Environmental Assessment Act (1997), the Environmental Protection Act, O.Reg.359/09, the Aggregate Resources Act, and the Cemeteries Act.

Required Contents

An archaeological assessment is divided into stages 1-4, as per the Ministry of Tourism and Culture 2011 Standards and Guidelines for Consultant Archaeologists for land-based archaeology.

The assessment must adhere to both the Standards and Guidelines for work conducted within lands which comprise the City of Toronto.

Stage 1

Background Study and Property Inspection – The consultant archaeologist reviews the geographical and historical information for lands which are part of the development proposal, and completes a detailed land use study. The land use study is to include a review of historical land use and ownership records (e.g. assessment rolls, census records, commercial directories).

For City of Toronto proposals/projects, a property inspection is mandatory and not optional.

Stage 2

Property Assessment – A field examination takes place which may require either a surface or pedestrian survey or test pit surveys of the subject property. Special conditions such as brownfield properties or deeply buried urban contexts will require alternative strategies and should be discussed with Heritage Preservation Services staff in advance of work. If aboriginal archaeological sites may be encountered during Stage 2 work due to proximity to known archaeological sites in the area or local or oral history, First Nations engagement and consultation will be required at Stage 2 assessment. Special conditions should be discussed with HPS staff prior to the assessment being undertaken.

Stage 3

Site Specific Assessment – When potential archaeological sites are identified during the course of Stage 2 work, additional detailed information is obtained through a Stage 3 assessment. This will delineate and evaluate the significance of the site found and make recommendations for appropriate mitigation measures. For some sites, no further work will be recommended at the end of Stage 3. First Nations engagement and consultation will be required should aboriginal archaeological sites be discovered at Stage 3. The City of Toronto’s Official Plan Policy 10 c) states that “indigenous cultural remains should be identified, recorded, protected and preserved” rather than be subject to full archaeological assessment including documentation and removal.

Stage 4

Mitigation of Development Impacts – Stage 4 includes implementing long-term protection strategies for archaeological sites to be impacted by the project. If after full consultation with the City of Toronto, the proponent, the Ministry of Tourism and Culture, and the consultant archaeologist, protection of the site cannot be achieved, the consultant archaeologist may excavate the site to fully document features and remove artifacts prior to further soil disturbance activities taking place on site.

Additional submission requirements:

Provide two colour copies of all archaeological assessments completed, the Borden registration form if filed, and an electronic copy of all reports in PDF format.

Should the archaeological consultant recommendations include a program of archaeological monitoring during the construction process, an archaeological monitoring and mitigation strategy will be required as a condition of development approval.

Should the assessment result in the discovery of an archaeological site, or significant archaeological resources, the proponent will be required to prepare and implement a commemoration and interpretation strategy as a condition of the development approval.

Comments

Archaeological assessments are to be completed together with any associated mitigation well in advance of any soil disturbance. Archaeological assessments cannot be completed during certain times of the year (i.e. snow cover, frozen ground, excessive rain/wet conditions).

Description

Architectural Control Guidelines are a written and graphic manual providing division direction regarding the achievement of the built form and public realm policies contained in the Built Environment section of the Official Plan (Section 3.1). The Guidelines are a combination of text, plans, illustrative sketches and photos, sections and comparative models or examples that inform the proponent, public and City about the built form, landscape and structures on private lands within new neighbourhoods.

A land owner may choose to use a “Control Architect Process” to achieve the City’s built form objectives and control the quality of work in each phase. Discussions about Architectural Control Guidelines should be held with the Planner and Urban Designer in pre-application consultation meetings to determine the applicability of this form of guideline to the site. This is particularly important on large sites that will take many years to complete.

The Guidelines are written for the Control Architect to use in evaluating the design of buildings and associated landscapes within the area. The Guidelines may be an alternative to individual site plans (for single lots, and building types not normally processed through Site Plan Approval) in parts of the City where it is important for new buildings to blend with existing communities/neighbourhoods, to advance the emerging character of a new or redeveloping community/neighbourhood.  The Control Architect Process and the use of the Architectural Control Guidelines is a standard process for the development industry within the GTA.

When Required

Architectural Control Guidelines may be required for sites with multiple buildings.

  • Zoning By-law Amendments,
  • Plans of Subdivision applications for the development of large sites, or
  • Site Plan Control Applications.

The requirement for, and scope of, the Architectural Control Guidelines should be discussed with the Planner and Urban Designer in pre-application consultation meetings. Architectural Control Guidelines will likely be required for applications incorporating large land areas with a number of parcels or phases within a development, new streets and parks and sites of civic prominence.

Rationale

Architectural Control Guidelines are non-statutory planning tools. Architectural Control Guidelines are approved by the City and the landowner and implemented through an Architectural Control Process that is managed and paid for by the landowner. They address built form matters and may exceed the provisions of the Planning Act by addressing architectural matters such as materials, colours and detailing in addition to siting and building massing issues. The Guidelines depend upon agreement between the City and the developer regarding the importance of a high quality of architectural design.

When administered properly, the Architectural Control Process can streamline future planning approvals by clarifying design expectations for development and minimizing City staff involvement. In the appropriate agreement (i.e., subdivision agreement) requirements that building permits not be issued for lots under architectural control in advance of certification (in a form acceptable to the City) from a “Control Architect” will be included.

A “Control Architect” administers the Council approved Architectural Control Guidelines on behalf of the City and the developer. The Control Architect is an independent professional responsible for conducting a comprehensive review of each lot to ensure that siting, built form, materials, colours and landscaping, among other things, are in compliance with the approved Guidelines. To avoid potential conflict of interest, it is important that the Control Architect and the Design Architect not be the same individual or firm.

The Guidelines will address the whole of the new neighbourhood or plan of subdivision. Specific types of development, development blocks and/or built form may be specifically omitted at the discretion of the City. Where a contiguous tract of land is divided into several subdivisions or development sites, use of a comprehensive set of Guidelines will be encouraged to achieve architectural consistency within a larger neighbourhood.

The Guidelines will be flexible to accommodate change as it occurs while maintaining intact the essential urban design ideas.

Required Contents

Architectural Control Guidelines should be applied to development as a condition of subdivision or equivalent development approval process. The applicant should develop draft Architectural Control Guidelines as early as possible in the planning process with active participation by City staff. The Architectural Control Guidelines may be attached to or referenced by the applicable subdivision/development agreement. Approval for minor revisions to the Guidelines may be delegated to staff. Where major revisions are needed, Council approval may be required.

Final Architectural Control Guidelines

Architectural Control Guidelines will form part of a subdivision agreement and will consist of the following components (though modification may be required to address the requirements of individual neighbourhoods and districts):

  • Location Plan of the subject property.
  • Structure Plan that identifies the approved lot and block plan lot and block numbers, the visual public realm, priority sites and other lots deserving special/enhanced treatment to support the overall design concept and proposed character, such as: corner lots, T-lots, lots requiring enhanced rear or flanking façade treatment, corner lot fencing and rear lot fencing.
  • Built form principles.
  • Building siting and massing.
  • Built form and siting relationships between different building forms and types (i.e., bungalows, townhouse blocks) and site conditions (i.e., park, reverse lots, public walkway).
  • Implementation and approval process clearly identifying the roles of the Control Architect, the City and the developer and the builder.

More detailed design direction for the following:

  • Elevations: consistency, architectural style, coordination of models, colours and repetition, special elevations (gateway, corner lots, reverse lots, park lots, etc.)
  • Entry features (porches, porticos)
  • Windows and doors
  • Garages and driveways
  • Roofs and chimneys
  • Materials, architectural detail and colours of roofs, walls and foundations
  • Utilities
  • Fences and garden walls (visible to the public realm)
  • Landscaping

Additional built form matters may be included to address contextual and site specific conditions. These matters may include, but are not limited to, cultural or natural heritage, noise attenuation, height restrictions and topographic conditions.

Final Guidelines will include:

  • Eight bound paper copies of the study for distribution and review by appropriate agencies
  • One digital copy
  • Requests may be made for poster size prints for public meetings

Description

The Avenues as shown on Map two of the Official Plan are important corridors along major streets where reurbanization is anticipated and encouraged. Contextual and appropriate reurbanization of the Avenues will be achieved through the preparation of Avenue Studies. These studies will be undertaken by the City and will set out the terms of reurbanization and include urban design guidelines and a comprehensive zoning by-law for the Avenue. Due to the significant number of Avenues, the program to complete all the studies will take several years. In the meantime, development in Mixed Use Areas on an Avenue prior to the completion of an Avenue Study may proceed provided the applicants of such proposed development undertake an Avenue Segment Review.

As described in policy 2.2.3.3b of the Official Plan, Segment Reviews are required to:

  1. include an assessment of the impacts of the incremental development of the entire Avenue segment at a similar form, scale and intensity, appropriately allowing for distinguishing circumstances;
  2. consider whether incremental development of the entire Avenue segment as identified in the above assessment would adversely impact any adjacent Neighbourhoods or Apartment Neighbourhoods;
  3. consider whether the proposed development is supportable by available infrastructure; and
  4. be considered together with any amendment to the Official Plan or Zoning By-law at the statutory public meeting for the proposed development.

For a more fulsome explanation of the Avenues and the relevant development policies, applicants should refer to Section 2.2.3 of the Official Plan.

When Required

The Official Plan requires that all applicants submit an Avenue Segment Review as part of their Official Plan Amendment and/or Zoning By-law Amendment application package for any proposed development in the Mixed Use Areas on Avenues where an Avenue Study has not yet been completed, and where the Avenues & Mid-Rise Study does not apply.

For applications within areas where a Segment Review has been previously submitted a full Segment Review may not be required. This depends however on when the previous Segment Review was completed, and the applicant’s ability to demonstrate that their proposed development would not alter the findings of the previous Segment Review(s) and that the proposed development would continue to establish a positive precedent for the rest of the Avenue Segment. In these scenarios applicants are encouraged to consult with City Planning staff as early in the development approval process as possible to determine if a full Segment Review is required and the elements to be studied.

 It should also be noted that applications on sites designated Apartment Neighbourhood Areas, do not require a Segment Review but applicants are expected to discuss and address Avenue policies in the associated planning rationale. Further, applications on sites designated Employment Areas and/or on sites designated Mixed Use Areas proposing employment uses without a residential component may not be required to submit a full Segment Review. As with the above, applicants with these scenarios are encouraged to consult with City Planning staff as early in the development approval process as possible.

Rationale

The overall goal of the Avenue Segment Review is to ensure that the proposed development will establish a positive precedent for the future reurbanization of the Avenue, with particular regard to building form, massing and intensity. Acceptance of the review is dependent upon the Segment Review reasonably demonstrating that the proposed development will have no adverse impacts and will establish a positive precedent for the Avenue Segment that is subject to the review. A clear indication as to how the policies of Section 2.2.3.3b) of the Official Plan have been addressed, along with the other Avenue policies and other relevant policies of the Plan is required.

Required Contents

The Official Plan identifies criteria Avenue Segment Reviews are to meet in policy 2.2.3.3b) and specific details regarding content can be found in the sidebar on page 2-16 (Avenue Studies and Development Applications). Although the sidebar refers to the contents of an actual Avenue Study it does state that an application for development on a site where an Avenue Study has not yet been completed will be evaluated through a process that mirrors that of an Avenue Study. In other words, a Segment Review may cover similar study topics but would not produce a specific set of development and design guidelines or an implementing zoning by-law beyond the development site.

Final determination of the boundaries and content of a Segment Review will be determined by City Planning staff based on a review of the area’s context and from discussions with the applicant’s consultant. During pre-application consultation, City Planning staff will work with the applicant’s consultant to determine the specific requirements of the Segment Review based on the nature of the proposed application and the context of the study area.

Determining Avenue Segment Review Boundaries

Generally speaking, the Avenue segment to be reviewed is defined by the context of the area and/or how similar the subject site is to other properties and land uses along the segment. Boundary indicators can include but are not limited to:

  • lands designated as Mixed Use Areas
  • land uses
  • built form
  • zoning
  • land uses along the segment frontage
  • natural and or manmade features that act as a boundary (i.e. ravines, rail lines, roads, highways etc.)
  • lot size and pattern

At a minimum the Segment Review should address an area large enough that the impacts of the proposed development, including the precedent setting (i.e. cumulative) impacts, can be assessed.

General Outline of Contents

  • Purpose and Summary
    • Need to meet OP Avenue policy 2.2.3.3b).
  • Discussion of the Proposal
    • What is being proposed – same as contained in the submitted planning rationale.
  • Policy Context
    • Identify relevant provincial, OP policies and zoning provisions.
  • Avenue Segment Review Boundaries
    • As per 2.2.3.3b;
      • define the boundaries based on indicators above (pictures help).
      • unless there are unique circumstances to the contrary, the depth of the study area should generally be limited to the properties fronting the Avenue or to a reasonable depth.
  • Precedent Projects
    • Applicant to include a table of all projects constructed and/or approved in the segment area over the last 5 years comparing:
      • OP designation;
      • zoning category;
      • lot dimensions;
      • massing;
      • building height (metres and storeys); and
  • Identification of Potential “Soft Sites”
    • “Soft sites” are generally under-utilized and/or vacant sites that front onto the Avenue where opportunities to redevelop to a more intense, urban and transit-oriented land use and built form have been identified.  Examples may include single use and/or auto-oriented strip plazas, car dealerships, gas stations and/or one to two storey mixed-use commercial buildings.
    • Criteria for identifying candidate or “soft sites” could include, but are not limited to: lot size, depth, current use, accessibility to the Avenue (i.e.: site must front or flank the Avenue), interface with neighbouring land uses, ownership and assembly requirements.
    • Note: As per policy 2.2.3.4 of the Official Plan, the underlying land use designations and relevant polices as contained in Chapter 4 of the Official Plan prevail for all sites within the Avenue. Sites with designations that do not permit significant growth (i.e.: Neighbourhood Areas) should not be identified as potential soft sites, and sites designated Employment Areas along the Avenue Segment are intended to support employment intensification.
  • Development Scenario for Potential “Soft Sites”
    • Should be the same or similar to what’s being proposed unless the site or development has unique features that preclude a similar approach. Also, if an identified soft site has an associated development proposal, the Segment Review should incorporate the proposed development’s details (density, height, etc.).
  • Implications for the Segment
    • The Segment Review should identify the following:
      • projected number of residential units and commercial GFA;
      • surrounding land use impacts:
        • i.e. shadow, transition to surrounding neighbourhoods, design and streetscape considerations, pedestrian flow, water, sanitary, stormwater and other related servicing issues;
      • identification of the time horizon each soft site is expected to develop (i.e.: short, medium, long term);
      • transportation report on existing and future conditions, including transit service, walking and cycling environment, site access, opportunities for new links, parking, and bike parking: forecast conditions/impacts; and
      • recommended measures to mitigate transportation impacts. Traffic analysis will be carried out in a manner consistent with the City’s Guideline for Traffic Impact Studies, and other relevant transportation policies, guidelines and criteria. Where transportation planning issues are not be suited to this type of detailed assessment, a strategic review may be considered, in consultation with appropriate City staff;
      • estimate of new worker and residential populations arising from all development scenarios proposed for the site.
  • Community Services and Facilities
    • As part of a Segment Review a Community Services and Facilities Study must be undertaken. (See Terms of Reference for Community Services and Facilities Study).
    • The Segment Review may also suggest recommended actions that the City should consider in order to address any of the identified issues associated with the projected development of the segment. Segment Reviews should also provide maps of services and facilities serving the Segment Review area.
    • In certain cases, applicants may be required to submit stand alone Community Services and Facilities Studies in addition to an Avenue Segment Review. In these situations, the Segment Review may only provide a summary of and reference the larger Community Services and Facilities Study. For further information and assistance on these matters applicants are encouraged to consult with City Planning staff.
  • Conclusions
    • Based on the above, the Segment Review should conclude by addressing the following questions:
      • what does the Segment Review reveal?
      • are the impacts acceptable and/or can they be mitigated?
      • are there any recommended mitigation methods?
      • is the proposed form, scale and intensity of development appropriate for the site and area?
      • has it been reasonably demonstrated that the development will establish a desirable and positive precedent for the Avenues segment?

Comments

In addition to a hard copy, applicants should also submit a PDF version of their Segment Review.

  • Heritage Character Area
  • Transit City route
  • Sidewalk Widths
  • Setback requirements (4.8 or 6m)

Scale

  • Metric Scale
  • Must be drawn to a standard scale (i.e. 1:100, 1:200, 1:500) and preferably at same scale as Site Plan Drawing

General Details

  • Legal description
  • Based on original with stamp and initials of an Ontario land surveyor all existing construction (up-to-date and showing distances from lot lines), including underground vaults
  • Boundaries, dimensions and site area calculations of the parcel(s) of the site
  • Boundaries and dimensions of any abutting lands in which the applicant has an interest
  • Municipal address of buildings on or adjacent to the site
  • Spot elevations along the boundary of the site and in adjacent public boulevards
  • Ravine by-law limit, if applicable
  • Underlying lot fabric, including lot and registered plan numbers (part lot control exemption applications only)

Easements, Reserves, Widenings

  • Location, width and area of any rights-of-way and easements affecting the site and any elements within the easements; (identification of any widenings)

Site Circulation, General Parking, Accessible Parking and Driveways

  • Location, width and names of all roads or highways within or abutting the site

Public & Private Servicing Information

  • Location of existing above and below grade utilities within the adjacent street boulevard (Site Plan Control Applications only); location of any fire hydrants on property or in close proximity to property

Landscaping, Grading & Retaining Walls and Lighting

  • Location of all vegetation, watercourses, natural features, artificial features; including Municipal appurtenances and paved areas on or adjacent to the site
  • Location and grade of all existing trees including trees on adjacent properties within six metres of the subject site’s property lines

Description

A Community Services and Facilities (CS&F) Study may be required by an applicant to assist in the identification of current and required levels of social infrastructure required to support the health, safety and well being of local residents (matters pertinent to good planning). Accessible, high quality community services and facilities are essential to promote community interaction, engagement in community life and opportunities for education and recreation.

CS&F Studies are essential tools in determining the general health of local community infrastructure.  They are also important in identifying necessary improvements or refocusing brought about by changing or growing demand within a community.

CS&F serve the needs of the local population and for the purposes of CS&F studies generally include (but are not limited to):

  • elementary and secondary schools;
  • public libraries;
  • child care centres;
  • community and recreation centres;
  • arenas;
  • swimming pools;
  • social services; and
  • community space

A CS&F Study will review social, economic and demographic information in light of existing and projected supply and demand of community services and facilities. CS&F studies will provide a detailed inventory of all community services and facilities within a prescribed study area as well as a review of available capacities within those services and facilities in light of planned development in the area.

CS&F Studies will be prepared by the applicant, their agent or consultant. During pre-application consultation, Community Policy and Community Planning staff will work with the applicant and/or their consultant to determine the specific requirements of the CS&F Study based on the nature of the proposed application and the context of the study area.

When Required

Community Services and Facilities Studies may be required in relation to:

  • Official Plan amendment
  • Zoning By-law amendment
  • Plans of Subdivision; or
  • a combined application.

The determination of whether to require a Community Services and Facilities study in relation to one of the foregoing applications will be made by the City Planning Division having regard for the following:

  • The application is of a significant scale thus providing the potential for impacts on the provision of appropriate levels of community services and facilities.
  • Few community services and facilities are known to exist in the area in which the development application is located.
  • Little information is known about the capacity of existing community services and facilities in the area of the application.
  • The planning application results in the development of a new neighbourhood where little or no residential development currently exists.
  • The development application is located within a Regeneration Area in the Official Plan.  In these instances City Planning staff may also undertake a secondary plan that will include a CS&F strategy (based on the findings of a CS&F Study) to implement necessary improvements to community infrastructure.
  • The development application is located on an “Avenue” in the Official Plan for which an Avenue Study has yet to be undertaken.  The CS&F study will then form a part of the broader Avenue Segment Study that must be undertaken by the applicant.
  • The development application is or is part of a “large site” as defined by the Official Plan (greater than 5 hectares).  In this situation, City staff would also conduct a CS&F Strategy (based on the findings of a CS&F Study) to implement necessary improvements to community infrastructure.

Rationale

Creating a Livable City

As part of its objective to accommodate new growth while improving the quality of city living, the City of Toronto Official Plan requires the provision of adequate community services and facilities. Community Services and Facilities are as important to city building as the planning of physical services such as water, sewer, roads and transit. The undertaking of CS&F Studies allows the identification of community infrastructure issues that exist within the study area and any improvements that may be necessary to enhance the quality of life for area residents.

Policy Context

Chapter 3 of the Official Plan (Building a Successful City) provides the policy framework that will guide the City’s growth and achieve one of the OP’s key objectives – creating liveable neighbourhoods.  The policies in Chapter 3 must be considered with respect to all development applications and planning studies.  Additional studies related to specific areas of the City (such as Avenues) are to be applied in addition to the policies in Chapter 3.

The Policies in Section 3.2.2 (Community Services and Facilities) address the quality of life and well-being of Toronto’s communities by emphasizing the need to provide for the timely provision of community services and facilities.  The intent is to try and secure CS&F in such a way as to allow them to be phased into an area in step with the approved future residential or in some cases commercial development.  This will allow for communities to have access to CS&F as they emerge, hence contributing to the resident’s quality of life.

The Policies in Section 3.3 (Building New Neighbourhoods) recognize that new neighbourhoods must have a comprehensive planning framework that reflects City-wide goals as well as the local context.  This framework should include the provision of community services and facilities.

The policies set out in Section 2.2.3 (Avenues); encourage investment in community improvements, including CS&F by public agencies or public/private partnerships in the following areas: streetscape, transportation, parks and open space, community and rooftop gardens, and community and recreation services and facilities.  These policies also require consideration of the adequacy of parks and CS&F as part of applications in Mixed-Use Areas where an Avenue study has yet to be completed.

The policies in Section 4.7 (Regeneration Areas) encourage revitalization of unique areas of the City through a wide range of uses to attract investment, re-use buildings and encourage new construction. CS&F strategies (prepared by City staff) that build upon CS&F studies (prepared by applicants) will be required to inform the policies of the Secondary Plans for these areas.

Lastly, the policies of Section 5.5 (The Planning Process) outline the requirements for a complete planning application which includes a CS&F study for large applications.

Required Contents

The provision of the required contents of a CS&F Study is the responsibility of the applicant.  The applicant must meet with City Planning staff (both Community Planning and Community Policy staff) to finalize a terms of reference prior to the initiation of the study. The contents of a typical study include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Demographic profile of the study area including:
    • Population data, to be compared to City level data including current population by age and sex, population change from the last Census, population projections;
    • Family composition, to be compared to City level data including families by type, number of children; private households by type and size; marital status of residents in the study area;
    • Housing to be compared to City level data, including: occupied private dwellings by structural type, period of construction and tenure;
    • Level of development activity in the study area listing type of development, tenure, GFA, height, number of units, type of bedrooms, phase of development;
    • Immigrant population, to be compared to City level data including population by period of immigration, recent immigrants by selected countries of birth for the most recent census period (top five countries), number of immigrants in neighbourhoods in the study area and number and type of languages spoken, population mobility status;
    • Labour Force compared to City level data including labour force by occupation and labour force by industry; and
    • Socio-Economic characteristics (highest and lowest level of education attained by residents in the study area, labour force participants, average income and income range).
  • Inventory of services and facilities that exist in the study area for example:
    • Elementary and secondary schools;
    • Public libraries;
    • Child care centres;
    • Community and recreation centres;
    • Parks and Open Space;
    • Arenas;
    • Swimming pools;
    • Places of Worship;
    • Social services; and
    • Other publicly accessible community meeting or recreation space.
  • Maps of services and facilities serving the study area in which the development application is located.
  • Profiles of services and facilities, for example, programs offered, size of facilities, demand and capacity of facilities and programs, and who is served by the service or facility (age groups, gender), as well as contact information for all services and facility staff contacted in the course of the study. The study should discuss the ability of the service or facility to accommodate growth, barriers if any, and any new services that may be required as a result of the proposed development.
  • Additional information from City departments (PFR – Parks and Recreation, CNS, Public Health, Children’s Services, Library, Toronto Community Housing) and other large public agencies (School Boards) as may be required.
  • Highlights of existing studies and reports that may be available for the area.

Sources for the required information include Statistics Canada Census Information, The City of Toronto’s Web Site and the Toronto 211 Community Connection Web Site. Contact with agency staff may also be required for the capacity review.

City Planning staff will provide a letter of introduction to help consultants who are undertaking CS&F studies, to access staff, information and data sources of various City divisions, public agencies and social service providers.

Description

A digital model of the proposed development to allow staff to evaluate the physical impacts of the proposal. The model is integrated into the City’s computer model and is used to evaluate the impacts of the scale of the proposed development and its sun/shadow impacts.

When Required

The Computer Generated Building Mass Model may be required for the following applications for developments over 20 metres (6 storeys) in height:

  • Official Plan Amendments
  • Zoning By-law Amendments
  • Site Plan Control applications (Complex and Routine applications)

These models may also be requested for developments that are lower than 20 metres in height. The requirement for, and scope of this work, should be discussed with the Planner and Urban Designer in pre-application consultation meetings.

Rationale

To achieve the goals of Official Plan Policies:

3.1.2.3 “New development will be massed to fit harmoniously into its surroundings and will respect and improve the local scale and character. It will minimize the impact on neighbouring buildings and open space by:

  1. massing new building to frame adjacent streets and open spaces in a way that respects the existing and/or planned street proportions;
  2. creating a transition in scale to neighbouring buildings;
  3. providing adequate privacy, sunlight and sky view ensuring adequate separation between building walls; and
  4. minimizing shadows and uncomfortable wind conditions on neighbouring properties and open space.”

3.1.2.4 “New development should be massed to define the edges of streets, parks and open spaces at good proportion and locate taller buildings to ensure adequate access to sky view, sunlight and appropriate pedestrian level wind conditions for the proposed and future use of those spaces.”

Required Contents

  • Digital model drawings should include:
  • File names must identify the project’s address and drawing type.
  • Zip the files larger than 2.5MB.
  • Separate elements onto different layers and then create a “block” or “cell”.
  • Follow the AIA layering structure or clearly describing each layer.
  • Only submit relevant layers (seed files for standard layer information are available)
  • The City requires:
    •  property lines with dimensions
    • 3d models – building envelope only (you will be advised if individual floor plans are required)
    • landscaping details
    • street text
    • curbs, parking and ingress/egress
    • underground parking outline with entrance/exit
    • building outlines and minimum setbacks with dimensions
    • loading areas/docks
  • City’s reference system must be complied with NAD 27 and Modified Transverse Mercator 38.
  • Drawings should be in metres (decimal scale). Inform us of the scale, master and sub units.
  • Provide minimum and maximum drawing limits for each file.
  • Delete all hatching but leave any polygons or polylines needed.
  • Please ensure that all polygons are closed.

Format of the Model

Drawings can be submitted with the followings formats:

Vector Line Drawings:

  • DWG – AutoCAD 2010 or earlier
  • DGN – Microstation V8i, V8 2004 and J
  • DXF – only when the AutoCAD files are not available.
  • SHP – ESRI shape files for ArcGIS 9.3.1 or earlier
  • SKP – Google Sketchup 7 or earlier
  • DAE – COLLADA interchange format
  • 3DS – 3D Studio Max Autodesk interchange format.
  • WRL – Virtual Reality Modeling Language interchange format.

Note: do not encrypt drawings with password protection.

Notes for AutoCAD files:

  • Do not xref any files (bind xref files with the insert option under the bind command).
  • Ensure that all the work is saved in model space.
  • Explode multi-lines and dimensions created with the dimensioning command.
  • Redefine the drawing limits at the extents of the elements you are submitting.
  • Your file may be converted into Microstation. This application can only support 63 layers. If your file utilizes more than 63, elements will not necessarily remain on their own layer or the newly created ones.

Questions Regarding the Digital Model

If you have any questions regarding digital submissions please contact your Planner.

The CAD or GIS operator in the District Office will assist you with technical concerns.

Scale

  • Metric Scale
  • Must be drawn to a standard scale (i.e. 1:100, 1:200, 1:500)

General Details

  • Existing and proposed development including the outline of the proposed building
  • All property lines, abutting roads and building footprints on the site and on adjacent lots
  • Dimensioned relationships of the proposed buildings above and below grade to lot lines
  • General location of all fences, retaining walls, landscaping and recreational space
  • Existing and proposed underground structures and ramps or overhanging buildings
  • Identify grade, as per applicable zoning by-law definition
  • General concept for grading including the existing and proposed elevations at property lines, driveways (indicating slope) and building entrances
  • Ravine by-law limit, if applicable (note: the City’s Geospatial Competency Centre staff located at 18 Dyas Rd. (gcc@toronto.ca) can plot the ravine and natural protection limit on drawings/plans)

Easements, Reserves, Widenings

  • Existing and proposed reserves, easements or widenings

Waste Disposal Facilities

  • Solid waste/recycling pick-up storage facilities, if at grade

Site Circulation, General Parking and Driveways

  • Existing and proposed site circulation characteristics, including driveway entrances to the site
  • General location of driveways to adjacent properties abutting and/or across from the subject site, surface parking, loading and service areas and sidewalks as well as general location of driveways to adjacent properties abutting and/or across from the subject site, surface parking, loading and service areas and sidewalks
  • General location of paved areas including sidewalks, vehicular areas and other hard surface areas on the site and adjacent road allowance

Fire Code Requirements

  • Location of existing/proposed fire hydrants located within the municipal boulevard and/or on the subject property, existing and proposed fire routes, and existing/proposed siamese connection location(s), if required

Landscaping, Grading and Retaining Walls, and Lighting

  • General location of existing and proposed plantings on the site and on adjacent road allowance (Note: Existing trees on adjacent properties within six metres of subject site’s property lines must also be shown)
  • Spot elevations to assess relationship between the proposed development and abutting lands or roads, if different from survey

Terms of Reference are being prepared for this study. In the interim, the requirements and details of this study should you need one can be addressed during your pre-application consultation meeting.

Description

Conveyance Policy and the Peer Review Process

In February 2015, City Council approved the Policy for Accepting Potentially Contaminated Lands to be Conveyed to the City under the Planning Act (the Conveyance Policy). The Conveyance Policy updates and consolidates the City’s previous procedures and criteria, including the Peer Review Process, and applies when land is to be conveyed to the City as part of a planning application or where below-grade easements are required for new municipal infrastructure.

The Peer Review Process requires the applicant to submit to the City’s Peer Reviewer documentation regarding the environmental conditions on the lands to be conveyed or below-grade easements. The Peer Reviewers are Qualified Persons (QPs) hired by the City. The environmental work and reporting is to be carried out by a QP hired by the applicant in accordance with the requirements of the Conveyance Policy. The submission is peer reviewed only for the land that is to be conveyed to the City or below-grade easement. This documentation should be submitted to the City in conjunction with the development application or as soon as the requirement for land conveyances/below-grade easements to the City is known.

The owner is responsible for all costs associated with the Peer Review Process, including the City’s administrative fees. The Peer Review Process is administered by the Engineering & Construction Services Division.

The current overall requirements for accepting land conveyances and below-grade easements are detailed in Attachment 1 (Conveyance Policy), and summarized in Table 1, of the Staff Report as approved by City Council on February 11, 2015.

Note: This document is intended as a guidance document only. The Conveyance Policy contains detailed environmental requirements for land conveyances and below-grade easements.

Records of Site Condition

Records of Site Condition (RSCs) filed with the Ministry of Environmental and Climate Change (MOECC) require the property owner to demonstrate that the property meets regulated soil, sediment and groundwater standards.

As a condition of the City’s approval, a submission of a Letter of Acknowledgement of Filing of the Record of Site Condition (RSC) issued by MOECC confirming that the RSC has been prepared and filed in accordance with O. Reg. 153/04 will be required by the City, if applicable.

When Required

When the Peer Review Process is Required

The Peer Review Process may be required when land is to be conveyed to the City or below-grade easements for new municipal infrastructure are required as part of a planning application.

The Peer Review Process MAY be required for the following planning application types (see Peer Review exemptions below):

  • Official Plan Amendment
  • Zoning By-law Amendment
  • Consent to Sever
  • Site Plan Control Approval
  • Minor Variance

The Peer Review process is ALWAYS required for the following planning application types:

  • Plan of Subdivision

Exemptions to the Peer Review Process

There are certain circumstances when land conveyances to the City and below-grade easements are exempt from the Peer Review Process. The following are cases when the Peer Review Process is NOT required (not applicable to Plan of Subdivision applications):

  • For current Residential/Parkland/Institutional (R/P/I) lands being conveyed with no change to a more sensitive use that are less than or equal to (<) 100 m2.
  • For current Residential/Parkland/Institutional (R/P/I) lands being conveyed with no change to a more sensitive use that are more than 100 m2 AND are less than or equal to (<) 1.0 m in width.
  • For current Industrial/Commercial/Community (I/C/C) lands being conveyed with no change to a more sensitive use that are more than 100 m2 AND are less than or equal to (<) 1.0 m in width.

When Filing a Record of Site Condition is Required

  • For Site Plan, Consent to Sever, Minor Variance, Zoning Amendment and Official Plan Amendment Applications, as well as, below-grade Easements: A RSC is to be filed in accordance with provincial legislative requirements, i.e. when land use is to change to a more sensitive use as defined by O. Reg. 153/04
  • For Subdivision Applications: A RSC is to be filed in accordance with provincial legislative requirements for ALL conveyances, regardless of the change in land use

Exemptions for Filing a Record of Site Condition

  • Exemptions specified in O. Reg. 153/04

The current overall requirements for accepting land conveyances and below-grade easements are detailed in Attachment 1 and summarized in Table 1 of the Staff Report as approved by City Council on February 11, 2015 (the link is provided in Description section above).

Rationale

Section 3.4 of the Official Plan implicitly supports the clean-up of contaminated sites for reducing the risks to life, health and safety, property and ecosystem health.

The Council-approved Policy for Accepting Potentially Contaminated Lands to be Conveyed to the City under the Planning Act, February 2015, which updates and consolidates the City’s procedures and criteria for the acceptance of potentially contaminated lands conveyed to the City as a condition of a Planning Act application approval.

References:

Required Contents

For all land conveyances to the City or below-grade easements that are not exempt from the Peer Review Process, the owner of the land must undertake the appropriate environmental site assessment (ESAs), site remediation or risk assessment and the filing of a RSC, if required (see ‘When Required’ section).

All work and reporting is to be completed by the applicant’s Qualified Person (QP), and will be Peer Reviewed by an environmental consultant selected by the City (Peer Reviewer) and paid for by the applicant.

The environmental  reports and documents which will be Peer Reviewed by the Peer Reviewer include some or all of the following depending on site-specific requirements:

  • Phase I ESA
  • Phase II ESA
  • Remediation/ Verification Report
  • Pre-submission Form
  • Risk Assessment Report
  • Certificate of Property Use (including required supporting documents)
  • MOECC Letter of Acknowledgment of a Record of Site Condition

The QP must also submit the following as per the Conveyance Policy templates:

  • Qualified Person Preliminary Statement Letter
  • Reliance Letter

Approaches for Cleaning Up or Managing of Contaminated Sites

Contaminated land may be remediated using a Full Depth Generic approach or a Risk Assessment approach under the provisions of Ontario regulation 153/04 as amended under the Ontario Environmental Protection Act (OEPA).

Full Depth Generic Approach

If a Full-depth Generic approach is used, the site condition standards in effect are the more stringent of: the site condition standards of the intended land use or the standards of the most sensitive adjacent land use.

Risk Assessment Approach

If a Risk Assessment approach is used, site-specific standards are developed based on unique site characteristics.  The City’s Peer Reviewer DOES NOT typically review or comment on the risk assessment methodology or risk exposure calculations.

The Peer Reviewer DOES review and comment on the Proposed Risk Management Plan (and Risk Management Measures, if any) and draft Certificate of Property Use conditions (if any) to ensure compliance with the current Conveyance Policy.

At the end of the investigation and remediation or risk assessment process, the acknowledged Record of Site Condition issued by the MOECC must be submitted PRIOR to the City’s approval.

Comments

Refer to Ontario Regulation 153/04, Records of Site Condition, and the above references.

Context Plans can be purchased from the City’s Geospatial Competency Centre at 18 Dyas Rd., 1st floor, Toronto, ON M3B 1V5. Requests for Context Plans can be made via email: mapsales@toronto.ca or by phone to: 416-392-2506.

Scale

  • Metric Scale
  • Must be drawn to a standard scale (generally at 1:2000 metric scale)

General Details

  • Generally at 1:2000 metric scale, showing the footprint of the proposed development in relation to surrounding buildings, roadways, open spaces, natural features, vegetation and land uses
  • Include an area of approximately 300 metre radius from the property, or as appropriate, to give a clear indication of the proposal in the context of the immediate neighbourhood
  • Show all property lines

Description

A draft Official Plan Amendment identifies proposed changes to the Official Plan required to permit a proposal.

A review of the relevant Official Plan policies including information/rationale as to how and why an amendment to the Official Plan is required should be addressed in the required Planning Rationale.

When Required

A draft Official Plan Amendment is required if a proposal seeks to use, alter or develop a property in a way that does not conform to the Official Plan.  This includes a proposal seeking to add permission(s) to a land use designation’s permitted uses and/or amend Official Plan policy.

A draft Official Plan Amendment is required as part of a complete application under the Planning Act, and shall be submitted with an Official Plan Amendment application.  The draft Amendment may be included as an appendix in the required Planning Rationale.

Rationale

The Official Plan is a blueprint for how Toronto will grow to the year 2031. It describes the location and provides policies for new housing, employment, parks, office and retail areas, community services and other land uses. The Official Plan also establishes policies for the built environment, for improvements to the City’s hard services (such as transit, roads, sewers, etc.) and for the protection of the City’s natural environment.

Proposals are evaluated against the policies and criteria of the Plan.  Any change to the Official Plan to permit a proposal requires an Official Plan Amendment application.

Required Contents

A draft Official Plan Amendment shall follow the template including the appropriate amendment format required to address the proposal’s non-compliance with the Official Plan.

Draft Approval Certificate

Include the Draft Approval Certificate on each plan submitted at time of application

Draft Approval Certificate for Draft Plan of Condominium

  • location and number of units to be sold, on a floor-by-floor basis
  • all common elements (i.e., corridors, lobbies, elevators, etc.)
  • location and number of parking spaces, if they are to be sold separately
  • location and amount of landscaped open space and common recreation space

Section 51(17) of the Planning Act requires that plans show the following information, as appropriate:

Ownership Information and O.L.S. Signature

  • name of registered owner, signature and date signed
  • name of Ontario Land Surveyor, signature and date signed

Legal Description and Property Details

  • legal address of the property
  • boundaries of the land proposed to be subdivided, certified by an Ontario Land Surveyor
  • locations, widths and names of the proposed highways within the proposed subdivision and of existing highways on which the proposed subdivision abuts

Purpose and Use of the Lots and Adjoining Lands

  • purpose for which the proposed lots are to be used
  • existing uses of all adjoining lands
  • approximate dimensions and layout of proposed lots
  • natural and artificial features, including municipal appurtenances, such as buildings or other structures or installations, railways, highways, watercourses, drainage ditches, wetlands and wooded areas within or adjacent to the land proposed to be subdivided
  • availability and nature of domestic water supplies
  • nature and porosity of soil
  • existing contours or elevations as may be required to determine the grade of the highways and the drainage of the land proposed to be subdivided

Servicing Information

  • municipal services available or to be available to the land proposed to be subdivided
  • nature and extent of any restrictions affecting the land proposed to be subdivided, including restrictive covenants or easements

Key Plan

  • on a small key plan, on a scale of not less than one centimetre to 100 metres: all of the land adjacent to the proposed subdivision that is owned by the applicant or in which the applicant has an interest; every subdivision adjacent to the proposed subdivision; and the relationship of the boundaries of the land to be subdivided to the boundaries of the township lot or other original grant of which the land forms the whole or part

Final Approval Certificate

  • Include the Final Approval Certificate on each plan submitted for registration

Final Approval Certificate for Draft Plan of Condominium

Draft Plan of Subdivision (S. 51(17) of the Planning Act requires plans to show the following information)

 Draft Approval Certificate

  • Include the Draft Approval Certificate on each plan submitted at time of application

Draft Approval Certificate for Draft Plan of Subdivision

Ownership Information and O.L.S. Signature

  • name of registered owner, signature and date signed
  • name of Ontario Land Surveyor, signature and date signed

Purpose and Use of the Lots

  • purpose for which the proposed lots are to be used
  • existing uses of all adjoining lands

Legal Description and Property Details

  • legal address and legal description of the property
  • boundaries of the land proposed to be subdivided, certified by an Ontario Land Surveyor
  • locations, widths and names of the proposed highways within the proposed subdivision and of existing highways on which the proposed subdivision abuts, including proposal reserves
  • approximate dimensions and layout of proposed lots
  • natural and artificial features, including municipal appurtenances, such as buildings or other structures or installations, railways, highways, watercourses, drainage ditches, wetlands and wooded areas within or adjacent to the land proposed to be subdivided
  • the availability and nature of domestic water supplies
  • the nature and porosity of the soil
  • existing contours or elevations as may be required to determine the grade of the highways and the drainage of the land proposed to be subdivided
  • the municipal services available or to be available to the land proposed to be subdivided
  • nature and extent of any restrictions affecting the land proposed to be subdivided, including restrictive covenants or easements

Key Plan

  • on a small key plan, on a scale of not less than one centimetre to 100 metres, illustrate all of the land adjacent to the proposed subdivision that is owned by the applicant or in which the applicant has an interest; every subdivision adjacent to the proposed subdivision; and the relationship of the boundaries of the land to be subdivided to the boundaries of the township lot or other original grant of which the land forms the whole or part

Final Approval Certificate

  • Include the Final Approval Certificate on each plan submitted for registration

Final Approval Certificate for Draft Plan of Subdivision

 

Terms of Reference are being prepared for this study. In the interim, the requirements and details of this study should you need one can be addressed during your pre-application consultation meeting.

Description

The EMF Management Plan is a technical document (or plan) that provides an analysis of the electromagnetic fields (EMF) on the site of a proposed development that is within or abuts a hydro corridor. The EMF management plan identifies no-to-low-cost EMF exposure reduction measures based on the analysis.

Depending on the complexity of the project the EMF Management Plan must be prepared by a qualified individual as outlined in the Guidance Manual.

When Required

An EMF management plan is required for the following application types:

  • All Official Plan Amendments, Zoning By-law Amendments and Plan of Subdivision applications for residential, school or day nursery uses where the subject site is within or abuts a hydro corridor
  • All new high-voltage transmission lines or increases in the capacity of existing transmission lines in the City of Toronto.

Rationale

The authority to request an EMF management plan is provided by Toronto City Council’s decision to adopt a policy of prudent avoidance to reduce childhood exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) in and adjacent to hydro corridors with transmission lines.

Toronto City Council Decision Document (Meeting 23 July 15, 16 and 17, 2008).

Required Contents

An EMF Management Plan, in accordance with the EMF Management Guidance Document, should include the following elements:

  • An assessment of the magnetic fields on the subject lands based on current conditions. The field strengths should be determined by conducting magnetic field surveys when electrical transmission lines, distribution lines and equipment are operating under normal conditions.
  • An assessment of sources of magnetic fields within a proposed development.
  • An assessment of the magnetic fields on the subject lands based on future conditions where the influences on the magnetic fields may be changed by the addition/removal or operational modification of electrical transmission lines, distribution lines and equipment. This may be done by modifying the survey data to account for the altered conditions or by modeling to determine the impact of new/repositioned electrical lines or equipment on magnetic field levels.
  • Listing and description of strategies to reduce magnetic field exposures to children.

The Guidance Manual contains information on the required contents of an EMF Management Plan as well as procedures to prepare an EMF Management Plan.

Description

The purpose of the Energy Strategy is the early identification of opportunities to integrate local energy solutions that are efficient, low carbon and resilient. The findings will inform later studies including the Toronto Green Standard Energy Modelling Report. It will also inform the Renewable Energy Feasibility Study for all city agency, boards, commissions and divisions, where applicable.

When Required

The Energy Strategy applies to new development including residential, non-residential and/or mixed use and may apply to industrial development:

  • with a total gross floor area of 20,000 square metres or more; or
  • within a Community Energy Plan area approved by Council

In association with the following application types:

  • Official Plan Amendment
  • Zoning By-Law Amendment or
  • Plans of Subdivision

Rationale

The Energy Strategy is intended to contribute to achieving the City’s objectives to reduce energy consumption and GHG emissions and become more resilient. Official Plan policy 3.4.18 states that “innovative energy producing options, sustainable design and construction practises … will be supported and encouraged in new development … through: d) advanced energy conservation and efficiency technologies and processes that contribute towards an energy neutral built environment”.

Undertaking an Energy Strategy at the application stage for a Plan of Subdivision, Official Plan or Zoning Bylaw Amendment facilitates the following key outcomes:

  • Opportunity to site buildings to take advantage of existing or proposed energy infrastructure, energy capture and/or solar orientation at the conceptual design stage.
  • Consideration of potential energy sharing for multi-building development and/or neighbouring existing/proposed developments.
  • Consideration of opportunities to increase resiliency such as strategic back-up power capacity (for multi-unit residential buildings).
  • Identification of innovative solutions to reduce energy consumption in new construction and retrofit of existing buildings (if part of new development).
  • Exploration of potential to attract private investment in energy sharing systems.

Required Contents

This section presents minimum requirements for completion of the Energy Strategy and is not exhaustive. The applicant is encouraged to discuss the required contents with Environment & Energy Division staff prior to initiating the strategy.

1. Towards Zero Emissions Development

Calculate energy and emissions for the proposed development using the following scenarios:

  • Baseline – Toronto Green Standard Version 3 Tier 1
  • Higher Performance – Toronto Green Standard Version 3 Tier 2
  • Near Zero Emissions – Toronto Green Standard Version 3 Tier 4

The scenarios should include opportunities for super-efficient building envelopes and building-scale renewables, as well as opportunities for shared energy services (i.e. low- carbon thermal energy networks).

a. Energy Conservation and Demand Reduction

Identify and evaluate opportunities to achieve very low energy use intensities (EUIs) and reduced energy demands, through:

  • Building orientation and solar controls; thermal effectiveness of the building envelope; daylighting  design strategies; and
  • High efficiency mechanical systems (e.g. efficient HVAC systems, heat recovery, lighting solutions).

b. Low-Carbon Solutions

Identify and evaluate opportunities for low-carbon energy solutions on-site (i.e. within the proposed development site), and off-site through connection to nearby existing or planned buildings and infrastructure. This can include, but is not limited to:

  • Renewables, such as rooftop solar PV, geo-exchange in a nearby park, and heat recovery from sewer lines;
  • High efficiency combined heat and power (CHP);
  • Connection to an existing thermal network;
  • Rough-in for a future connection to nearby existing/in-development thermal energy networks (i.e. “district energy-ready”); and
  • A new thermal network connecting several planned developments in an area.

For multi-building (i.e. campus-type) proposals, identify and evaluate opportunities for shared energy solutions that include, but are not limited to:

  • Thermal energy distribution networks (i.e. piping) to connect buildings;
  • Shared mechanical room(s) for heating and cooling equipment;
  • Large-scale renewables such as lake water cooling, biomass, sewer heat and other means of waste heat recovery;
  • High efficiency CHP;
  • Thermal energy storage;
  • Shared backup power system(s) for multiple buildings; and
  • Micro-grid(s) with the ability to island from the electrical

2. Energy Resilience

Identify and evaluate opportunities for backup power systems that will improve the resilience of buildings to area-wide power outages, especially for multi-unit residential buildings. This includes meeting all emergency power (life safety) requirements, as well as providing for 72 hours (at a minimum):

  • Domestic water (hot and cold);
  • Elevator service; and
  • Space heating, lighting and receptacle power to the central common area/amenity space/lobby, where applicable.

3. Analysis, Preferred Scenario, and Recommendations

a. Calculate energy consumption, demand, and emissions for the proposed development according to the three scenarios. Include in calculations the energy performance of existing buildings (if any are part of the development site) using available utility data.

b. Estimate the contribution(s) of the identified on-site and off-site low-carbon solutions towards achieving zero emissions.

c. Based on the completed analysis, state the preferred scenario and conclude with recommendations and next steps to facilitate Establish the overall value proposition(s).

Format of the Report

  1. Executive summary
  2. Energy calculations, including data and assumptions, for existing buildings and new development (soft copy spreadsheet – Microsoft Excel format)
  3. Graphs of expected energy performance (Microsoft Excel format)
  4. Conclusions / Recommendations
  5. Appendices: supporting documentation, references, etc.

Contact

For further information please contact:

Environment & Energy Division – Energy Efficiency Office
City of Toronto
Metro Hall
55 John St., 2nd floor Toronto, ON M5V 3C6
416 392-1501

Reference Documents

Terms of Reference are being prepared for this study. In the interim, the requirements and details of this study should you need one can be addressed during your pre-application consultation meeting.

Terms of Reference are being prepared for this study. In the interim, the requirements and details of this study should you need one can be addressed during your pre-application consultation meeting.

Scale

  • Metric Scale
  • Must be drawn to a standard scale (i.e. 1:100, 1:200, 1:500)

Toronto Green Standard

  • If the proposal is subject to the requirements of the Toronto Green Standard, the applicant is required to illustrate compliance. Please refer to the Tier 1 of the Toronto Green Standard for details.

General Details

  • Ground floor layout showing entrances and typical/non-typical floor layouts
  • Location of indoor and outdoor amenity space and publicly accessible areas

Waste Disposal Facilities

  • Garbage/recycling/organics storage, sorting and compaction facilities including garbage chutes and tri-sorters, occupant lockers

Fire Code Requirements

  • Fire control panel location/details, if applicable

Pedestrian & Bicycle Infrastructure

  • Interior and exterior walkways, stairs, escalators, elevators and corridors
  • Bicycle parking and storage facilities
  • Shower and change facilities (commercial/institutional)

Public & Private Servicing Information

  • Dimensions and layout of corridors for loading, moving or servicing

Landscaping, Grading & Retaining Walls and Lighting

  • Existing and proposed grades on ground floor plan and basement floor plan
  • Location and identification of trees protected under city by-laws; including trees on adjacent properties within 6 metres of the subject site
  • Location of tree protection zones (where trees are being retained & protected)
  • Tree protection plan notes (where trees are being retained & protected)

Geotechnical Study

Dec 2017

Description

A Geotechnical Study is an objective, science-based sub-surface investigation study, prepared by a qualified expert (Geotechnical Engineer/Consultant) that analyses soil and bedrock composition to determine its structural stability and its ability to accommodate development. The study will be used to guide land use planning, the design and construction of buildings, municipal roads and services as well as to determine feasibility for infiltration of groundwater, if it is part of the proposal.

When Required

The Community Planner will inform the applicant that a Geotechnical Study is required.

These studies or reviews may be required for the following types of applications:

  • Zoning Bylaw Amendment;
  • Plans of Subdivision;
  • Consent to Sever; and
  • Site Plan Control

Geotechnical Studies are required for the design and construction of municipal roads and all developments.

The detailed design of any infiltration facilities will be based on site specific percolation tests. The number of tests will be dependent on the size of the facility and the different types of soils conditions found within the proposed facility foot print zone of influence.

Note: In addition to a Geotechnical Study a Hydrological Review is also required.

The applicant is responsible for the preparation and cost of these studies.

Rationale

To provide an assessment in the event that there may be significant challenges in the conceptual designs, land requirements, detailed design, and construction stages of a development and to supplement Stormwater Management Reports.

Required Contents

The following is a general outline of information to be included in the Studies/Reviews:
Identification of subsurface conditions including:

  • Soil, bedrock (if required), and groundwater characteristics
  • Locations of investigation on site and servicing plans
  • Factors of safety, feasibility and risk assessment
  • Mitigation measures and monitoring programs where necessary
  • Recommendations regarding below grade water tight structure(s) and/or requirement of PWDS Environmental Compliance Approval (ECA) from Ministry of Environment and Climate Change (MOECC) where applicable.

Comments

A Geotechnical Study shall be prepared by a qualified expert who is in good standing and who is a licensed Professional Geotechnical Engineer. The signed, stamped and completed Study report must be submitted to the City, and the engineer signing the study report shall take professional responsibility for its content and the accuracy of the information contained therein.


Hydrological Review

August 2018

Hydrological Review Summary Form

Description

A Hydrological Review, within the City’s context, is a review of the subsurface hydrologic and geologic conditions in an area or location to determine the quality and quantity of groundwater that may be required to be discharged to the City sewage works as a result of a proposed development.

When Required

The Hydrological review may be required for the following types of applications:

  • Zoning Bylaw Amendment;
  • Plans of Subdivision;
  • Consent to Sever; and
  • Site Plan Control

The applicant is responsible for the preparation and timely submission of the Review.

Rationale

The Hydrological Review aims to provide the City and the Developer information to complete a technical review for the proposed development site to address the issues pertaining to groundwater quality and quantity in accordance with the proposed options of disposal.

The applicant shall ensure that, at a minimum, the reference materials listed below are used in the preparation of the Hydrological Review:

  • Ontario Water Resources Act
  • Ontario Regulation 387/04. “Water Taking Regulation” (A Permit to Take Water (PTTW) from the MOECC may be required).
  • Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 681 – Sewers

Minimum Required Contents

The Review area shall encompass the land area covering the largest possible zone of influence that could result from the proposed groundwater taking.

The Hydrological Report shall include at a minimum, the following information:

Introduction/Background
  • Location and ownership of the property.
  • Proposed number of building structures.
  • Proposed sub-grade depth of the development and sub-surface structure area (square meters)
  • Land use classification of proposed building(s) (commercial, residential etc.).
  • Consulting firm and qualified person responsible for completion of the Hydrological Review, when it was performed and an outline of the scope of the work
  • Characterization of the hydrological setting (i.e., a brief description of the local and regional physiographic features and the groundwater flow direction).
Study Area Map
  • A map showing locations of all identified on-site and off-site wells, boreholes, buildings, property boundaries, watercourses, and drainage features within the study area.
  • Hydrological cross-sections with geology, borehole locations and water level measurements
Geology and Physical Hydrology
  • Borehole logs with accurate geological description:
  • All boreholes and wells shall be geo-referenced horizontally (coordinates) to a maximum tolerance of 0.1 meters to the North American Datum of 1927 – 1974 Adjustment (for compatibility with COSINE) and are projected to a Modified Transverse Mercator projection in Zone 10 (NAD27-74 Adj. MTM 10);
  • All borehole surfaces and top of well casings shall also be geo-referenced vertically to a maximum tolerance of 0.01 meters to the Canadian Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1928, Pre 1978 Adjustment (CGVD28-Pre78 Adj.);
  • Table of hydro stratigraphic units and their properties.
  • If satellite access for GPS survey is restricted, survey can be completed with total station equipment.

A site-specific hydrological model with site-specific hydrological information describing:

  • Soil materials, including thicknesses, composition, and
  • The bedrock
  • Identify all underlying aquifers and aquitards.
  • Proximity to nearby surface water.
Wells

A minimum of five groundwater wells shall be installed at locations that represent the entire proximity of the site. If that site is larger than 30m x 30m additional groundwater wells shall be installed and the qualified professional will use professional judgment to determine the number of additional wells required. It is required that the wells be installed with a minimum of 3.8 cm diameter and 2 meters below the lowest elevation in the proposed building structure(s). Additionally, one well is to be drilled to a minimum depth of 10 m below the lowest elevation in the proposed building structure(s), or to bedrock, whichever is shallower. For sites with physical restrictions or smaller and site-specific sites pre-consultation with City Staff may be required to decide on the number of wells required.

Static Water Level Analysis

Static groundwater level measurements shall be monitored at all wells located within the property for a minimum of 3 months with measurements taken every 2 weeks for a minimum of 6 measurements. The intent is for the qualified professional to use professional judgment to estimate the seasonally high groundwater level. Water levels can be measured manually or using pressure transducers and data loggers, or similar instrumentation. All water levels shall be presented as geodetic elevations referenced to a City of Toronto, or Canadian Geologic Survey benchmark.

Pump Test/ Drawdown Analysis

Pumping tests may require a PTTW from the MOECC and discharge approval from Toronto Water if extracted groundwater is proposed to be discharged into the City’s sewage works. At minimum, the following are to be considered:

  • The testing shall be carried out for at least 24 hours if applicable
  • Ensure the discharge from the pumping test(s) will not have a negative impact on the site’s neighboring environment or City sewage work;
  • All observation well(s) shall be monitored using digital devices.
  • Pumping test data, graphs, and a summary of the pumping test data and analysis.
  • The discharge flow rate(s) shall be monitored using digital devices
  • If any other method other than a pump test is used, provide detailed explanation of rationale.

Static groundwater level shall be monitored at all pumping and observation wells several times prior to and after the pumping test to measure the recovery.

Slug test can be done to estimate hydraulic conductivity in certain circumstances. Developments where no construction dewatering or long-term groundwater management is required, slug tests are acceptable for each well. If any other method other than pump test is used or should a shorter time period be proposed detailed explanation of the rationale for the change is to be provided and agreed by City staff.

Water Quality

The report needs to include a baseline water quality review. The water quality must be analyzed for all the parameters listed in Chapter 681-Sewers of the Toronto Municipal Code. Non-filtered sample(s) must be collected from the proposed groundwater source(s). Water quality data must be analyzed by a Canadian laboratory accredited and licensed by Standards Council of Canada and or Canadian Association for Laboratory Accreditation. A true copy of the analysis report, Certificate of Analysis and a chain of custody record for the sample must be included with report. The water quality data must be collected within nine (9) months prior to the date of submission.

Private Water Drainage System (PWDS)

If the property proposes a PWDS then the Review shall summarize the post-construction groundwater discharge to the City’s sewage works from the proposed development. The Review shall clearly identify the proposed construction methods (ex. open cut, caisson wall) for the sub-structure. If the proposed sub-structure construction method is not available during the Review preparation then the Review shall be prepared identifying groundwater infiltration quality, quantity and peak discharge flow rate for all of the proposed construction methods. The Review shall include the total subfloor drain area, and information regarding the estimated total volume per day from the subfloor drain, and the perimeter drains.

Groundwater Extraction and Discharge

In order to evaluate the capacity of the City sewage works, the Review shall provide the following detailed information:

  • Flow Rate (L/min) and Total Volume (L/day) for short-term (construction dewatering)
  • Flow Rate (L/min) and Total Volume (L/day) for long-term drainage of groundwater from the PWDS
  • Proposed maximum Pump Peak Flow Rate from PWDS (L/min) as proposed by Mechanical Consultant
  • If watertight structure (structure that has not included a private water drainage system) is to be incorporated as part of the proposed development, additional information will be required.
  • If on-site containment (infiltration gallery/dry well etc.) is to be incorporated as part of the proposed development additional information will be required.
Evaluation of Impact should be undertaken by both the Geotechnical Engineer and the Hydrogeologist

The impact(s) of groundwater taking and discharging should be determined based on the maximum possible area of influence-using actual field testing data. Investigation should be performed to determine any adverse impacts as suggested below:

  • Negative impacts to City’s sewage works in terms of quality and quantity, including existing infrastructure.
  • Negative impacts to the natural environment.
  • Impacts to land stability.
Proposed Mitigation Measures and Monitoring Plan

If it has been determined that there will be a negative impact to the natural environment, City’s sewage works, or the land stability, as a result of groundwater taking and discharging, the Review shall identify the following:

  • The extent of the negative impact.
  • Details of the existing or pre-construction state of all the infrastructure, City sewage works and natural environment within the affected zone.
  • The proposed mitigation and monitoring plan.

In the event that a proposed mitigation plan is recommended, subsequently, a follow-up report is required confirming that the affected zone has been returned to its pre-development condition prior to the groundwater taking and discharging.

Comments

Hydrological Review shall be prepared by a qualified person who is in good standing and a licensed Professional Geoscientist or exempted Professional Engineer as set out in the Professional Geoscientists Act of Ontario. The signed, stamped and completed Review report must be submitted to the City, and the qualified person shall take professional responsibility for its content and the accuracy of the information contained therein.

The Hydrological Review Summary Form must be completed and submitted by the Qualified Professional who prepared the Hydrological Review. The completed summary form must be attached to the Hydrological Review.

Description

A Heritage Impact Assessment (HIA) is a study to evaluate the impact the proposed development or site alteration will have on the cultural heritage resource(s) and to recommend an overall approach to the conservation of the resource(s).  This analysis, which must be prepared by a qualified heritage conservation professional, will address properties identified in the City of Toronto’s Inventory of Heritage Properties (which includes both listed and designated properties) as well as any yet unidentified cultural heritage resource(s) found as part of the site assessment.

This study will be based on a thorough understanding of the significance and heritage attributes of the cultural heritage resource(s), identify any impact the proposed development or site alteration will have on the resource(s), consider mitigation options, and recommend a conservation strategy that best conserves the resource(s) within the context of the proposed development or site alteration.

The conservation strategy will apply conservation principles, describe the conservation work, and recommend methods to avoid or mitigate negative impacts to the cultural heritage resource(s).  Minimal intervention should be the guiding principle for all work.  Further, the conservation strategy recommendations will be in sufficient detail to inform decisions and direct the Conservation Plan.

Where there is the potential of impacting archaeological resources an Archaeological Assessment will be undertaken as an additional study.

When Required

A HIA is required for the following application types if the property is on the City of Toronto’s Inventory of Heritage Properties:

  • Official Plan Amendment
  • Zoning By-law Amendment
  • Plans of Subdivision
  • Site Plan Control

A HIA may be required by staff for the following additional application types:

  • Consent and/or Minor Variance and Building Permit applications for any property included on the City of Toronto’s Inventory of Heritage Properties
  • Where properties adjacent to a cultural heritage resource are subject to Official Plan Amendment, Zoning By-law Amendment, Plans of Subdivision, Site Plan Control and/or Consent and/or Minor Variance applications

Heritage Permit applications for any property designated under Part IV (individual) or Part V (Heritage Conservation District) of the Ontario Heritage Act

Rationale

The HIA will inform the review of an application involving a cultural heritage resource(s) included on the City of Toronto’s Inventory of Heritage Properties. The rationale for the requirement to provide an HIA arises from: the Ontario Heritage Act; Section 2(d) of the Planning Act; Section 2.6.3 of the Provincial Policy Statement (2005); Chapter 103: Heritage, City of Toronto Municipal Code; and Section 3.1.5, Policies 1-13 of the City of Toronto’s Official Plan.

Format

The HIA will be broad in scope but provide sufficient detail to communicate the site issues and inform the evaluation of the recommended conservation approach for the cultural heritage resource(s).  The study will be submitted in hard copy and PDF format.

Principles

The HIA will apply appropriate conservation principles such as:

  • The Parks Canada Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places in Canada (2003);
  • Ontario Ministry of Culture’s Eight Guiding Principles in the Conservation of Historic Properties (1997);
  • Ontario Ministry of Culture’s Heritage Conservation Principle’s for Land Use Planning (2007); and
  • Well Preserved: the Ontario Heritage Foundation’s Manual of Principles and Practice for Architectural Conservation (1988).

Required Contents / Format

The HIA will include, but is not limited to, the following information:

Introduction to Development Site

  • A location plan indicating subject property (Property Data Map and aerial photo).
  • A concise written and visual description of the site identifying significant features, buildings, landscape and vistas.
  • A concise written and visual description of the cultural heritage resource(s) contained within the development site identifying significant features, buildings, landscape, vistas and including any heritage recognition of the property (City of Toronto’s Inventory of Heritage Properties, Ontario Heritage Properties Database, Parks Canada National Historic Sites of Canada, and/or Canadian Register of Historic Places) with existing heritage descriptions as available.
  • A concise written and visual description of the context including adjacent heritage properties and their recognition (as above), and any yet unidentified potential cultural heritage resource(s).
  • Present owner contact information.

Background Research and Analysis

  • Comprehensive written and visual research and analysis related to the cultural heritage value or interest of the site (both identified and unidentified): physical or design, historical or associative, and contextual.
  • A development history of the site including original construction, additions and alterations with substantiated dates of construction.
  • Research material to include relevant historic maps and atlases, drawings, photographs, sketches/renderings, permit records, land records, assessment rolls, City of Toronto directories, etc.

Statement of Significance

  • A statement of significance identifying the cultural heritage value and heritage attributes of the cultural heritage resource(s).  This statement will be informed by current research and analysis of the site as well as pre-existing heritage descriptions.  This statement is to follow the provincial guidelines set out in the Ontario Heritage Tool Kit.
  • The statement of significance will be written in a way that does not respond to or anticipate any current or proposed interventions.  The City may, at its discretion and upon review, reject or use the statement of significance, in whole or in part, in crafting its own statement of significance (Reasons for Listing or Designation) for the subject property.
  • Professional quality record photographs of the cultural heritage resource in its present state.

Assessment of Existing Condition

  • A comprehensive written description and high quality color photographic documentation of the cultural heritage resource(s) in its current condition.

Description of the Proposed Development or Site Alteration

  • A written and visual description of the proposed development or site alteration.

Impact of Development or Site Alteration

  • An assessment identifying any impact the proposed development or site alteration may have on the cultural heritage resource(s).  Negative impacts on a cultural heritage resource(s) as stated in the Ontario Heritage Tool Kit include, but are not limited to:
    • Destruction of any, or part of any, significant heritage attributes or features
    • Alteration that is not sympathetic, or is incompatible, with the historic fabric and appearance
    • Shadows created that alter the appearance of a heritage attribute or change the viability of an associated natural feature or plantings, such as a garden
    • Isolation of a heritage attribute from its surrounding environment, context or a significant relationship
  • Direct or indirect obstruction of significant views or vistas within, from, or of built and natural features
  • A change in land use (such as rezoning a church to a multi-unit residence) where the change in use negates the property’s cultural heritage value
  • Land disturbances such as a change in grade that alters soils, and drainage patterns that adversely affect a cultural heritage resource, including archaeological resources

Considered Alternatives and Mitigation Strategies

  • An assessment of alternative options, mitigation measures, and conservation methods that may be considered in order to avoid or limit the negative impact on the cultural heritage resource(s).  Methods of minimizing or avoiding a negative impact on a cultural heritage resource(s) as stated in the Ontario Heritage Tool Kit include, but are not limited to:
    • Alternative development approaches
    • Isolating development and site alteration from significant built and natural features and vistas
    • Design guidelines that harmonize mass, setback, setting, and materials
    • Limiting height and density
    • Allowing only compatible infill and additions
    • Reversible alterations

Conservation Strategy

  • The preferred strategy recommended to best protect and enhance the cultural heritage value and heritage attributes of the cultural heritage resource(s) including, but not limited to:
    • A mitigation strategy including the proposed methods;
    • A conservation scope of work including the proposed methods; and
    • An implementation and monitoring plan.
  • Recommendations for additional studies/plans related to, but not limited to: conservation; site specific design guidelines; interpretation/commemoration; lighting; signage; landscape; stabilization; additional record and documentation prior to demolition; and long-term maintenance.
  • Referenced conservation principles and precedents.

Appendices

  • A bibliography listing source materials used and institutions consulted in preparing the HIA.

Links

Description

The Housing Issues Report provides an opportunity for staff to review proposals for development that could potentially impact the City’s supply of affordable and mid-range rental housing and affordable ownership housing.  Depending on the complexity of the application, the information requirements may be addressed in a letter of several pages or a longer report. The material can be prepared by the owner, the agent, the applicant or a member of the consultant team, depending on the nature of the application.

When Required

A Housing Issues Report is required in situations where development could potentially impact the City’s supply of affordable and mid-range rental housing and affordable ownership housing, for the following types of applications:

  • Official Plan Amendment
  • Zoning By-law Amendment
  • Plans of Condominium (involving the conversion of existing rental housing to condominium)

Rationale

The Official Plan(s) speak to the need of preserving and enhancing the City’s existing stock of affordable and mid-range rental housing and making gains in the supply of new affordable housing (both rental and ownership). In particular, Policies 5 through 8 of Section 3.2.1 of the Toronto Official Plan address issues regarding the preservation of the existing stock of rental housing and Policy 9 addresses the issue of the supply of affordable housing.

Required Contents

Housing Issues Reports should contain:

  • Description of Proposal – as it relates to the relevant housing policies, including statistics such as the number of existing residential (including rental) units, the number of residential units to be retained and/or added to the site, the types and sizes of such units, whether they are intended to be condominium registered, any relevant phasing issues and site and contextual considerations.
  • Relevant Planning Process/Other Applications (i.e., Official Plan Amendment, Zoning By-law Amendment, Condominium Registration).
  • Planning Rationale – as it relates to the relevant housing policies, this should address Provincial Policy Statement and Planning Act considerations; relevant Official Plan policies (Metroplan, former municipal OP, Toronto Official Plan) including information/rationale as to how and why Official Plan policy is being addressed by the proposal, implemented and complied with; relevant Zoning By-law information (areas of compliance and non-compliance and why).
  • Analysis and Opinion – as to the why the housing proposal is good planning, including issues of impact.
  • Summary and Conclusions.

The submission should reference the results of all pre-application discussions held with any civic officials, as well as all discussions held in the community regarding any housing issues.

The following additional information must be provided:

Intensification of Existing Rental Sites (Policy 3.2.1.5)* (where all existing rental units will be maintained)

Number of existing (non-condominium registered) rental units by type, including number of units used for other purposes (employee/superintendent, common rooms, etc.).

  • Rent roll(s) for existing building(s). As of the month of application, providing the rent for each unit by type (including utilities and excluding separate charges such as parking and cable) or a summary report indicating the number and type of existing units with rents below the affordable and mid-range rent thresholds (see the definitions in Section 3.2.1 of the Official Plan).
  • Any proposed improvements or renovations to the existing buildings(s), and information about consultation with existing tenants regarding the proposed improvements.
  • A construction mitigation strategy, providing details of tenant protection measures to be employed during construction, and a tenant communication plan.
  • Information on the expected tenure of the new building(s).
Demolition of Existing Rental Housing (Policy 3.2.1.6)*

 Number of units by type (number of bedrooms, floor area) proposed to be demolished.

  • Number of vacant units (and dates vacated) and number of units used for other purposes (employee/superintendent, common rooms, etc.).
  • Rent roll(s) for existing building(s) proposed to be demolished. As of the month of application, providing the rent for each unit by type (including utilities and excluding separate charges such as parking and cable).
  • A proposal for the replacement of the demolished rental units with units of the same types and sizes and at similar rents.
  • A proposal for a Tenant Assistance and Relocation Plan to assist the current tenants and information regarding consultation with tenants about the proposed demolition.
  • A list containing the names and mailing addresses of the tenants of the building(s) proposed to be demolished.
  • Information on the expected tenure of all of the new building(s) on the site. This policy requires that any replacement rental units are not to be condominium registered.
Redevelopment of Social Housing Sites (Policy 3.2.1.7)*

Number of units by type (number of bedrooms, floor area) proposed to be demolished.

  • A summary report (or rent rolls) providing the rent for each unit type in the existing building(s) as of the month of application (including utilities and excluding separate charges such as parking and cable). The rental information required is for the market rents and not the actual rents charged to tenants receiving rent-geared-to-income subsidies. Information on the number of RGI units is also to be included.
  • A proposal for the replacement of the demolished rental units with social housing units at similar rents, including a proposal for replacement of any rent-geared–to-income units with a similar number of these units.
  • A construction mitigation strategy, providing details of tenant protection measures to be employed during construction, and a tenant communication plan.
  • A proposal for a Tenant Assistance and Relocation Plan to assist the current tenants and information regarding consultation with tenants about the proposed demolition.
  • Information on the expected tenure of the new building(s). This policy requires that any replacement social housing, rental units are not to be condominium registered.
Conversion of Rental Residential Properties to Condominium (Policy 3.2.1.8)*
  • Number of units by type (number of bedrooms, sizes) proposed to be converted.
  • Number of vacant units (and dates vacated) and number of units used for other purposes (employee/superintendent, common rooms, etc.).
  • Rent roll(s) for existing building(s). As of the month of application, providing the rent for each unit by type (including utilities and excluding separate charges such as parking and cable).
  • A list containing the names and mailing addresses of the tenants of the building(s).
  • Evidence that the tenants have been advised of the application and information regarding consultations with tenants about the proposed conversion.
  • Indication of the nature of any renovations, improvements, repairs or changes to the building(s) undertaken in conjunction with the condominium conversion.
Residential Developments Greater Than 5 Hectares in Size (Policy 3.2.1.9) *

 Number of proposed new residential units by type (number of bedrooms) and tenure (rental, condominium or freehold), and the number proposed to meet the affordability requirement.

  • Number and form of new housing units that will be in forms other than single-detached and semi-detached houses.
  • Estimated rents and/or initial sales prices of the affordable units by type.
  • Where construction of the units is expected to occur in phases, information regarding the number of affordable units to be provided per phase.
  • Refer to the requirements of Toronto Official Plan Policy 3.2.2.5 (see the Terms of Reference for Community Services and Facilities Studies).

*It is anticipated the issues raised by these Policies will be secured through an agreement with the City using a variety of means (including Section 37 and/or Section 51 of the Planning Act).

Scale

  • Metric Scale
  • Must be drawn to a standard scale (i.e. 1:100, 1:200, 1:500)

Toronto Green Standard

  • If the proposal is subject to the requirements of the Toronto Green Standard, the applicant is required to illustrate compliance. Please refer to the Tier 1 of the Toronto Green Standard for details.

General Details

  • Existing and proposed elevations at property lines, driveways, building entrances
  • Proposed easements and encroachments
  • Identify all improvements to adjacent public boulevards and sidewalks, which may include one or more of the following: trees, shrubs, hedges, plantings or other ground cover, permeable paving materials, street furniture, curb ramps, waste and recycling containers, lighting and bicycle parking facilities

Site Circulation, General Parking, Accessible Parking and Driveways

  • Paving/surface materials of sidewalks, walkways, vehicular areas and other hard-scaped areas

Public & Private Servicing Information

  • Existing and proposed utilities, transformers, gas regulators, air intakes/exhausts, garage access stairs, etc., on site and on adjacent road allowance (show full right-of-way)

Lighting

  • Proposed site lighting, ground signs, audio speakers, fences and retaining walls including the public boulevards adjacent to the site

Landscaping, Grading & Retaining Walls

  • Location, size, number and species of existing trees under the City’s Tree by-laws that are to be retained/protected (including trees on adjacent properties within six metres of the subject site’s property/lot lines)
  • Soil volume for trees in hardscaping
  • Tree protection plan notes for trees being protected including those in ravine protected areas, adjacent to City of Toronto streets and roadways and City-owned Parkland
  • Proposed plantings on the site including all street frontages, public walkways, driveways and easements, open areas and on adjacent road allowance (should be co-ordinated with proposed Site Servicing Plan)
  • Green roof planting details
  • Locations and dimensions of significant landscaping features and species list
  • Location, height and material of all fences, screen walls, living walls, retaining walls, play equipment, recreational facilities, benches, street furniture
  • Location, height and type of lighting and ground signs
  • Location and planting details for proposed trees and other plantings
  • Soil is retained on-site or adjusted or replaced with soil of equal or better quality

Description

  • To determine the appropriate loading requirements of a proposed development.
  • To justify any deviation between this loading requirement and the loading requirements (number and size of loading spaces) of the applicable Zoning By-law
  • To ensure that the loading requirements are adequate for each phase of development including the ultimate development scenario
  • To identify alternative strategies to satisfy the loading requirements of the development (i.e., shared loading opportunities, delivery time restrictions, off-site loading depots, etc.)

When Required

A Loading Study may be required for the following application types:

  • Zoning By-law Amendment seeking to amend the requirements for loading facilities or when the proposed loading facilities are not considered adequate for the proposed use.
  • Consent to Sever or Minor Variance applications
  • Site Plan Control Applications

Rationale

Objective

The objective of a Loading Study is to estimate the loading demand generated by a development and, on this basis, to establish the number and size of on-site loading spaces that should be provided, recognizing the site constraints and local conditions. Alternatively, a loading strategy could be developed to identify how the loading demands of the project can be satisfied. This work may be required to justify the requested amendment to the Zoning By-law.

Format

 A Loading Study is prepared by a qualified transportation consultant and includes sufficient details to inform decisions regarding the provision of loading requirements for a development.

Process

A Loading Study, when required, is to be submitted in conjunction with the development application. The applicant is encouraged to discuss the need for a study and its contents with City staff prior to preparation of a study.

Principles

A Loading Study must be based on established loading activity rates supplemented by any available local survey data or experience. A Loading Study must recognize the general principle that the loading demand generated by a development or re-development should generally be satisfied on-site and that the development should not rely on on-street loading to satisfy the demands. This work may include provisions for shared facilities.

Required Contents

A Loading Study should include the following information:

  1. Location plan of the subject property
  2. Property description
  3. Owner/Consultant contact
  4. Inventory of any on-site loading facilities
  5. Utilization of existing facilities during peak periods of loading demand
  6. Estimate of the loading demand generated by each phase of the development including, where applicable:
    1. Types of loading/delivery/service vehicles
    2. Frequency and duration of deliveries, by type of vehicle
    3. Time of deliveries, by type of vehicle
  7. Plans illustrating the movement of vehicles entering and exiting the loading space(s), including turnaround maneouvers.
  8. Plans illustrating the service connections between the loading facilities and the various parts of the development that the loading spaces are intended to serve.
  9. An assessment of the feasibility and appropriateness of shared loading on the site.
  10. A loading strategy if the peak loading demand cannot be accommodated on-site.

Description

An objective, science-based study, prepared by a qualified expert, of a proposed development’s potential impact on the natural heritage system shown on Map 9 of the City of Toronto Official Plan (2006) and ways to mitigate negative impacts on and/or improve the natural heritage system.

Rationale

The authority to request this study is provided by the Planning Act, the 2005 Provincial Policy Statement and the 2006 Toronto Official Plan.

The Provincial Policy Statement specifies that natural heritage features and areas shall be protected for the long term and that the diversity and connectivity of natural features and the long-term ecological function and biodiversity of natural heritage systems should be maintained, restored or where possible, improved.

The Toronto Official Plan environmental policies recognize the importance of protecting, restoring and enhancing the natural ecosystem which includes the natural heritage system.  Policy 3.4.10 states that development is generally not permitted in the natural heritage system illustrated on Map 9.  Where the underlying land use designation provides for development in or near the natural heritage system, development will recognize natural heritage values and potential impacts on the natural ecosystem as much as possible; and minimize adverse impacts and, when possible, restore and enhance the natural heritage system.

When Required

All proposed development in or near the natural heritage system will be evaluated to determine the potential for the development to adversely impact the natural heritage system (policy 3.4.12).  If it is likely that the development will have negative impacts on the natural heritage system then a Natural Heritage Impact Study may be required to assess these impacts and identify measures to mitigate impacts and/or improve the natural heritage system.

A Natural Heritage Impact Study is required in the following circumstances:

  • for any proposed undertaking on lands within the natural heritage system that are particularly sensitive as shown on Map 12 of the Official Plan (see OP policy 3.4.13); and
  • prior to permitting development in or on lands adjacent to certain provincially significant natural heritage features as defined by the Ministry of Natural Resources (e.g., wetlands, areas of natural and scientific interest) and the City of Toronto (e.g., significant woodlands and valley lands) (see OP policy 3.4.14).

Natural Heritage Impact Studies may be required for the following types of applications:

  • Official Plan Amendment
  • Zoning By-law Amendment (or combined)
  • Plans of Subdivision
  • Consent to Sever
  • Site Plan Control

The Community Planner will inform the applicant if a Natural Heritage Impact Study is required.  The applicant is responsible for the preparation and cost of the study.

Required Contents

1.0 Background/Context

The following information will be included in the study:

  1. Development site location/address/ownership;
  2. Description of the proposed development including location of existing and proposed buildings, structures, driveways, parking areas, landscaping, site grading and drainage, underground services and related easements, and other site alteration.
  3. Map(s) showing the locations of the proposed development elements, the Natural Heritage System, the Ravine By-law, the Valley and Steam Corridor and natural heritage information as indicated below.

2.0  Identification of Natural Heritage Features and Functions

The natural heritage issues to be addressed will be scoped in consultation with City/agency staff, consultants and through review of site specific information.

Where applicable, the following aspects of the natural heritage system will be addressed:

  • terrestrial natural habitat features and functions including wetlands and wildlife habitat;
  • known water courses and hydrologic features and functions;
  • significant physical features and landforms;
  • riparian zones or buffer areas and functions;
  • vegetation communities and species of concern; and
  • significant aquatic features and functions

Key natural heritage information will be shown on a map in relation to the proposed development including:  the limit of the natural heritage features and functions; the location of top-of-bank; the drip line of significant vegetation; the location of any provincially or locally significant features such as wetlands, areas of natural and scientific interest (ANSI’s) and environmentally significant areas.

The City of Toronto has a natural heritage inventory database which includes information on natural heritage features and functions.  The information can be made available to the applicant for the site and surrounding area.  Information from Natural Heritage Impact Studies will be used to update the natural heritage inventory database.

Information on flora and fauna may need to be collected over a three season period (spring, summer and fall) in order to be complete.

In some areas, the location of top-of-bank has already been determined by the TRCA; in other areas its location must be determined/confirmed through site specific field investigation in consultation with TRCA and City staff and may require the landowner/proponent to prepare surveys or geotechnical studies.

Natural heritage features and functions of interest may be located on or near to the site.  The term near may require interpretation and will depend on the nature of the development (e.g., scale, extent of site alteration) as well as the proximity and type of natural heritage.

3.0  Impact Identification and Analysis

The impacts of the proposed development, both during construction and after completion, on the natural heritage features and functions will be identified and assessed.

Specific impacts may include the number and location of trees or amount of natural or naturalized vegetation to be removed, grade changes, area of stream bed to be disturbed, nature of changes to surface and subsurface runoff, amount of habitat   removal/fragmentation/encroachment.  Temporary impacts during construction may include habitat disruption, sediment transport and diversion of water flows.  Impacts associated with ongoing occupation of the development may include increased noise and lighting, dumping of organic waste.

4.0  Responses to Impacts

The measures that will be taken to mitigate negative impacts, both during construction and after completion, on the natural heritage features and functions identified in section 2.0 and the effectiveness of these measures will be specified.  Where possible, adverse impacts will be avoided rather than mitigated.  Mitigation proposals will be specific enough to allow evaluation of the effectiveness of the measures.

Development will be set back from the following locations by at least 10 meters, or more if warranted by the severity of existing or potential natural hazards:

  • the stable top-of-bank of valleys, ravines and bluffs;
  • other locations where slope instability, erosion, flooding or other physical conditions present a significant risk to life or property; and
  • other locations near the shoreline which may be hazardous if developed because of flooding, erosion or dynamic beach processes.

Minor additions or alterations to existing development, replacement structures and accessory structures are exempt from this requirement.

Reducing or eliminating impact is preferred over mitigation.  In some cases the development will need to be modified to avoid negative impacts.  Monitoring and further mitigation may be required or may be part of impact management.

The study will describe any measures that will be taken to improve natural heritage features and functions, including measures to compensate for lost features or functions and enhancements to the natural heritage system.  As much as possible, improvements will be accommodated in or adjacent to existing natural heritage features on-site before off-site locations are considered.  Plans for natural heritage improvement must be approved by the City.

5.0  Conclusions/Recommendations

Summarize the findings, identify residual impacts that cannot be avoided or fully mitigated.  Recommend conditions for development approval including monitoring, if appropriate.

Comments

Applicants should discuss the purpose, scope and content of the Natural Heritage Impact Study with appropriate City and agency staff before commencing the study.

The Natural Heritage Impact Study should be prepared early in the planning process to ensure that the constraints and opportunities associated with natural heritage on or near the site are known and can inform the development. City and agency staff will provide input to the terms of reference and review the report.

The Natural Heritage Impact Study should be coordinated with other studies related to fulfilling the following requirements:

  • City of Toronto Ravine By-law (Chapter 658 of the Toronto Municipal Code)
  • City of Toronto Tree By-law (Chapter 813, Article III of the Toronto Municipal Code)
  • City of Toronto Wet Weather Flow Management Master Plan
  • TRCA’s Development, Interference with Wetland’s and Alterations to Shorelines and Watercourses Regulation (Ontario Regulation 166/06)
  • The recommendations of local studies such as Watershed Studies, Rouge Management Plan, etc.

Where possible, one coherent assessment of impacts related to the natural heritage should be prepared rather than a series of separate studies.

The principles and criteria which will be used to evaluate the Natural Heritage Impact Study and its recommendations are those set out in the Planning Act, Provincial Policy Statement, City’s Official Plan, and other relevant documents such as the Wet Weather Flow Management Policy.

Description

A technical report that provides a written description of the impact of noise generated by a proposed development on the surrounding environment, the impact of noise from the surrounding environment on the proposed development and the impact of noise from the proposed development on itself as well as mitigation measures to reduce any negative impacts.

The report:

  • provides a written description of:
    • the impact of noise generated by a proposed development on the surrounding environment;
    • the impact of noise from the surrounding environment on the proposed development and;
    • the impact of noise from the proposed development on itself.
  • Details of all measures proposed to mitigate or reduce the anticipated negative noise impacts.

This Noise Impact Study is to be prepared, on behalf of the applicant, by a Consultant that is either an accredited Acoustic expert or a qualified Professional Engineer.

When Required

Noise Impact (Feasibility and/or Detailed Assessment) Studies may be required to support  the following applications for developments:

  • Zoning By-law Amendment
  • Site specific zoning by-law
  • Site Plan Control
  • Plans of Subdivision
  • Consent to Sever

Noise impact Studies may also be a requirement of a site specific zoning by-law.

The requirement for a Noise Impact Study may be a condition of initial approval of the proposed development.

Rationale

Official Plan Section 2.2.4 (Policy 6) requires that development adjacent to or nearby Employment Districts should be appropriately designed, buffered and/or separated from industries as necessary to mitigate adverse affects including those from noise to promote safety and security.

Official Plan Section 3.4 (Policy 21) refers to the possible requirement of a study in cases where uses such as airports, transportation/rail infrastructure, corridors and yards, waste management facilities and industries are adjacent to sensitive land uses such as residences, educational and health facilities to appropriately design, buffer, and/or separate the facilities and uses from each other to prevent adverse effects from noise:

To assist in identifying impacts and mitigative measures, the proponent may be required to prepare studies in accordance with guidelines established for this purpose. The proponent will be responsible for implementing any required mitigative measures.

In addition to sensitive land uses, the Official Plan in Section 4.6 (Policy 6(f)) deals with mitigation of the effects of noise among other things in order to create competitive, attractive, highly functional Employment Areas.  In addition, Section 3.2.3 (Policy 3) requires that the effects of nearby development including noise be minimized as necessary to preserve the quality of parks and open spaces.

4.1 (policy 2 and 3 (b)), 4.6 (Policy 6(i) (iv) and 7 (b))

Required Contents

During pre-application consultation, City Planning staff will work with the applicant’s consultant to determine if such a report is requires and, if so, the specific requirements of the Study, based on the nature of the proposed application and the context of the study area.

The Study should include, but is not necessarily limited to:

  • Details of assessment criteria
  • Methods and assessment locations and the appropriate figures and charts showing the detailed results including how the development complies with the City of Toronto Noise By-Law (Chapter 591 of the Toronto Municipal Code) and any other published criteria, guidelines and acceptable noise levels at similar land uses in the City of Toronto including the Ministry of the Environment’s (MOE) minimum standards for noise impacts for stationary uses, road and rail traffic, and air traffic, as applicable.
  • Identification and  analysis of the impact of noise from the proposed development on adjacent streets, parks and properties
  • Identification and  analysis of the impact of all noise generated from the immediately surrounding area, including without limiting the foregoing, the operations of the airports, transportation/rail infrastructure, corridors and yards, waste management facilities, industries and other noise generating uses on the proposed development
  • Identification and  analysis of the impact of all noise generated within the  proposed development on itself
  • Recommendations for noise mitigation and any adjustments to the site plan and architectural design, as are necessary to comply with relevant regulations and standards including the need for filing  Certificates of Approval (Air & Noise) to the Ministry of the Environment

Note: A municipality or planning board may wish to hire an outside consultant to peer review selected technical reports submitted in support of a development application where there is no in-house expertise available).

Description

  • To determine the appropriate parking requirements of a proposed development.
  • To justify any deviation between this parking supply and the parking requirements (number and size of parking spaces) of the applicable Zoning By-law.
  • To ensure that the parking requirements are adequate for each phase of development including the ultimate development scenario.
  • To identify alternative strategies to satisfy the parking requirements of the development (i.e., shared parking opportunities, payment-in-lieu, off-site parking, etc.)

When Required

A Parking Study may be required for the following application types:

  • Zoning By-law Amendment seeking to amend the requirements for parking facilities or when the proposed parking supply is not considered adequate for the proposed use.
  • Plans of Condominium (if the application is to convert an existing rental property to condominium tenure).
  • Consent to Sever or Minor Variance applications.
  • Site Plan Control Applications

Rationale

Objective

The objective of a Parking Study is to estimate the parking demand generated by a development and, on this basis, to establish the number and size of on-site parking spaces that should be provided, recognizing the site constraints and local conditions. Alternatively, a parking strategy could be developed to identify how the parking demands of the project can be satisfied. This work may be required to justify the requested amendment to the Zoning By-law.

Format

A Parking Study is prepared by a qualified Transportation Consultant and includes sufficient details to inform decisions regarding the provision of an appropriate supply of parking for a development.

Process

A Parking Study, when required, is to be submitted in conjunction with the development application. The applicant is encouraged to discuss the need for a study and its contents with City staff prior to the preparation of a study.

Principles

A Parking Study must be based on established parking rates for different land uses and supplemented by any available local survey data or experience. A Parking Study must recognize the general principle that the parking demand generated by a development or re-development should generally be satisfied on-site and that the development should not rely on on-street parking or off-street public parking to satisfy the demands. This work may include provisions for shared facilities.

Required Contents

A parking study should include the following information:

  1. Location plan of the subject property
  2. Property description
  3. Owner/Consultant contact
  4. Inventory of parking facilities in the area
    1. On-site parking
    2. On-street parking
    3. Off-street public parking in the area
  5. Utilization of existing facilities during peak periods of parking demand
  6. Estimate of the parking demand generated by each component of the development including, where applicable:
    1. Residents
    2. Employees
    3. Visitors/Customers/Patrons
  7. An assessment of the feasibility and appropriateness of shared parking on the site
  8. A parking strategy if the parking demand cannot be accommodated on-site
  9. Information and plans showing the location of any off-site parking and the lease arrangements for this parking

Description

A technical document that provides a model and written description of the impact of winds associated with development on adjacent streets, parks and open spaces. These studies are done to evaluate the impact of the wind conditions at various times of the year.

When Required

Study may be required for:

  • All developments over 20 metres (six storeys) in height in the North York Center and Sheppard subway areas.
  • Zoning By-law Amendments seeking development over 20 metres (six storeys) in height may be asked to provide a Wind Study. The requirement for this should be discussed with the Planner and Urban Designer in pre-application consultation meetings.
  • Site Plan Control applications over 20 metres (six storeys) in height (Complex applications only).

Rationale

To achieve the goals of Official Plan Policies:

3.1.2.3 “New development will be massed to fit harmoniously into its surroundings and will respect and improve the local scale and character. It will minimize the impact on neighbouring buildings and open space by:

  1. minimizing shadows and uncomfortable wind conditions on neighbouring properties and open space.”

3.1.2.4 “New development should be massed to define the edges of streets, parks and open spaces at good proportion and locate taller buildings to ensure adequate access to sky view, sunlight and appropriate pedestrian level wind conditions for the proposed and future use of those spaces.”

Required Contents

In the majority of instances, the content described under Final Wind Study will be sufficient to appropriately assess the impacts of proposed developments. However, a Preliminary Wind Study may be required for large sites, waterfront sites and/or sites where a substantial increase in height is requested. The requirement for, and scope of this work, should be discussed with the Planner and Urban Designer in pre-application consultation meetings.

Preliminary Wind Study

A preliminary wind study may be required for developments that meet the above criteria.  The study will be conducted during the design development phase by a qualified microclimate specialist to identify building massing that needs to be altered in order to avoid adverse wind conditions.

General issues to be addressed in the preliminary wind study include the following:

  • Height of the proposed development in relation to the height of surrounding structures
  • The orientation and general massing of the development with respect to the primary wind directions
  • Location and shape of specific design features that induce wind activity
  • Orientation of the development with respect to sun angles
  • Potential impact of wind speed increases created by the development on the surroundings
  • Outline of basic mitigative features to be included in development design including base and podium conditions, canopies and tower orientation

As part of the preliminary study, a quantitative pedestrian comfort evaluation including a wind tunnel test will be undertaken. This study will include a minimum of 15 sensor locations. The focus of this initial study is to recommend appropriate mitigation measures that involve changes to the building design, massing and form. Changes to landscaping are not to be included in the initial study.

The assumption is that the wind flow characteristics and remedial solutions outlined at the end of Appendix 6 of the North York Secondary Plan for wind control will be incorporated into tested building designs and/or will be used to modify building design to achieve appropriate wind conditions.

Final Wind Study

Prior to finalizing the application, proposals that meet the study criteria may require quantitative wind testing by a certified wind tunnel specialist that meets the following criteria:

  • Model Scale
    • The model shall be no smaller then a 1:500 representation of the proposed development and will include all buildings within a minimum of 480m of the site, in keeping with the industry standard.
  • Test Configuration
    • Unless otherwise agreed to by the City, the following conditions will be evaluated:
      • Initial conditions defined as all existing City approved development, those developments under construction and the development being proposed
      • If design mitigation is necessary to increase pedestrian comfort, the mitigation measures are also to be evaluated
    • Development that is approved but not built for 5 years is not to be included in the test.
  • Scope of Study
    • Before the final testing is done, the test sensor locations will be approved by the City of Toronto Urban Designer. A draft proposal for sensor locations should be faxed or emailed to the Urban Designer for comment.
    • Pedestrian comfort is to be evaluated based on wind force, thermal comfort and wind chill to evaluate the comfortable use of sidewalks and open spaces for appropriate uses including sitting, standing and walking.
    • Areas found to be uncomfortable or severe must be accompanied with mitigation solutions. At this stage of the process, this may include landscape elements.
    • The submission will include:
      • Eight bound paper copies of the study for distribution and review by appropriate agencies. The submission will include a letter summarizing the study, the wind impacts of the development and appropriate mitigation measures.
      • One digital copy of the development massing.

General Details

  • Illustrating the proposed development from an adjacent street location at the height of a pedestrian showing the building, major building entrances and adjacent built form
  • Bird’s eye perspectives may be requested

Description

The Planning Rationale provides an overall planning framework for understanding the proposal from the applicant’s point of view. This document is intended to help the applicant organize and substantiate the application and to assist staff in the review of the proposal to expedite the City’s responses.

Depending on the complexity of the application, the information requirements can be addressed in a letter of several pages or a longer report. The material can be prepared by the owner, the agent, the applicant or a member of the consultant team, depending on the nature of the application.

When Required

A full Planning Rationale is required for the following applications:

  • Official Plan Amendment
  • Zoning By-law Amendment
  • Plans of Subdivision
  • Plans of Condominium (conversion of existing rental housing to condominium only)
  • Significant Site Plan Control applications

A Covering Letter is required for the following applications:

  • Plans of Condominium (new condominiums)
  • Smaller Site Plan Control applications
  • Part Lot Control Exemption
  • Plan Revisions

Rationale

The Planning Rationale is required to:

  • Provide a clear understanding of the proposal;
  • Provide an opportunity at the outset to establish why the proposal should be considered and approved;
  • Highlight information specific or particular to the proposal (i.e., special history, different circumstances); and
  • Assist civic officials in undertaking their analysis and preparing reports on the application.

Required Contents

The Planning Rationale shall contain:

  • Description of the proposal, overview, major statistics (i.e., height, density, parking), relevant phasing issues, site and contextual considerations.
  • Process steps/approvals required (i.e., Zoning, Site Plan Control, Land Division, Condominium).
  • Context – built form and land use
  • Site description
  • Site’s planning history such as previous approvals, legislative references, relevant authorities (i.e., Site Plan Control Agreements, site specific By-law) with copies of relevant documents.
  • Planning Rationale, if applicable, should address relevant Provincial Policy Statement and Planning Act considerations; relevant Official Plan policies (Metroplan, former municipal OP, Toronto Official Plan) including information/rationale as to how and why Official Plan policy is being addressed by the proposal; with relevant Zoning By-law information, areas of compliance and non-compliance and why.
  • Discussion of how the proposal will address Official Plan Section 37 policies (Policies 5.1.1.1 to 5.1.1.9 and any Secondary Plan provisions), if applicable.
  • Analysis and opinion as to why the proposal is good planning, including issues of impact.
  • Summary and conclusions.
  • For Zoning By-law Amendments, the results of the Preliminary Project Review should be provided or a list prepared detailing the potential amendments to the Zoning By-law; a formatted draft Zoning By-law Amendment is not required for a complete application.

The Covering Letter for Plans of Condominium involving new condominiums, smaller Site Plan Control and Part Lot Control applications shall contain:

  • Description of the proposal, overview, major statistics (i.e., height, density, parking), relevant phasing issues, site and contextual considerations.
  • Site description and surrounding land uses/context/built form.
  • Site’s planning history such as previous approvals, legislative references, relevant authorities (i.e., Site Plan Control Agreements, site specific By-law) with copies of relevant documents.

In addition, the Covering Letter for Plan of Condominium applications should provide a description and background on the type of application (i.e., leasehold, common elements, phased, vacant land, standard) and on any related planning approval process or on any unusual circumstances (i.e., strata plan). The letter should identify whether the application is the same as the approved Site Plan and if there have been any changes, what those changes are and why. If there was no previous planning process including Site Plan Control approval, the letter should explain the circumstances (i.e., conversion of rental).

Comments

Avenues

Should an application be submitted in a Mixed Use Area on an Avenue (as illustrated on Map 2 of the Official Plan) prior to the City undertaking or completing an Avenue Study for the surrounding area, the Planning Rationale should address the issues outlined in Policy 2.2.3 (3b) of the Official Plan, as well as the Council approved Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study.

Major Facilities

Should an application be submitted seeking to locate sensitive land uses such as residences and educational and health facilities adjacent to major facilities such as airports, highways, railway corridors and waste management facilities, the Planning Rationale should address the issues outlined in Policy 3.4.18 of the Official Plan.

Employment Lands

Should an application be submitted seeking to implement the Official Plan permissions for large scale, stand alone retail stores or power centres on major streets bordering an Employment Area (as illustrated on Map 3 of the Official Plan), the Planning Rationale should address the issues outlined in Policy 4.6 (3a and 3b) of the Official Plan.

Downtown Plan

Should an application be submitted in Mixed Use Areas 1, Mixed Use Areas 2, Mixed Use Areas 3 and Regeneration Areas within the Downtown Plan area (as illustrated on Map 6A of the Official Plan) applicants will be required to submit a Complete Community Assessment as described in the Toronto Development Guide Glossary of Terms.

These Terms of Reference are Applicable as of October 1, 2018.

Description

The Public Consultation Strategy Report is a complete application submission requirement brought about by amendments to the Planning Act on July 1st, 2016. The requirement is referenced in Planning Act  Regulations 178/16, 179/16 and 180/16. This statutory requirement is intended to “get the applicant thinking” in a pro-active manner about:

  • How to build “trust” in the area impacted by the proposal;
  • Who the audience or “public” is who will be impacted by the proposal; and
  • Ensuring that the public’s voice is heard, evaluated and recorded as part of the Development Application review process.

The public consultation strategy proposed should be reflective of the location, complexity, scale and nature of the proposal and may be prepared by the owner, the agent, the applicant, or a member of the consulting team.

Municipal Record

The Public Consultation Strategy Report needs to be deemed complete by the municipality within 30 days of receipt of the application. Even after the Report is deemed complete however, applicants are encouraged to view the Report as a “living document” that may need to be updated and revised in collaboration with planning staff, at a later time in the Development Application review process, in order to stay relevant during the entire process.

All public consultation outcomes, whether initiated by the applicant or the City, will be documented and become part of the municipal (Council) record that informed Council in making the decision to approve or refuse the application.

When Required

The Public Consultation Strategy Report is a complete application requirement for the following application types:

  • Official Plan Amendments
  • Zoning By-law Amendments
  • Plans of Subdivision
  • Plans of Condominium (“Vacant Land” type only)

Note: Before submitting a Development Application for review to the City, applicants are encouraged to meet with City staff at a pre-application consultation to discuss the proposal to get a clearer understanding of what is required, including consulting with staff with regard to the Public Consultation Strategy Report complete application requirement.

Consultation Costs

City Planning staff will hold at least one community meeting in the area affected by the application, in addition to the minimum statutory meeting requirements of the Planning Act, for proposed Official Plan and/or Zoning By-law amendments prior to approval (as required by Section 5.5.1 of the Toronto’s Official Plan). The City will continue with its policy of asking the applicant to pay for the distribution of notices beyond 120 meters, when requested by Council to do so, in association with this community meeting.

Unless otherwise agreed to, the cost of any other public consultation referenced in the Public Consultation Strategy Report will be at the expense of the applicant.

Report Requirements

The Public Consultation Strategy Report will include the following:

1.   Purpose of Consultation

What the applicant wishes to accomplish in engaging and consulting with the public with regard to the proposal.

2.   Key Messages

Key messages the applicant would like conveyed to the public during the consultation process with regard to the proposal.

3.   Desired Outcome(s)

What the applicant hopes to achieve or accomplish by the end of the consultation period with regard to the proposal.

4.   Scope of Consultation – Area(s) of Impact

The applicant will identify the proposal’s geographic area of impact and explain why this area of impact was chosen. The geographic area of impact can be both local and citywide, depending on the proposal. Direct and indirect impacts will be considered in determining the area(s) of impact.

5.   Audience

The applicant will provide a demographic profile of the geographic area of impact and identify the target audience(s) potentially impacted by the proposal to be consulted throughout the consultation period, including groups that may be more difficult to engage and/or who may not be familiar with the City’s public consultation processes, such as youth, segments of the senior’s population or recent immigrant groups to the City.

6.   List of Matters to be addressed

The applicant will identify a list of matters to be brought forward for discussion and consultation, propose a communication strategy for updating the list and reporting out on matters requiring follow-up and/or further resolution.

7.   Communication & Consultation Strategy – Tools, Methods and Techniques

The applicant will prepare Communication and Consultation Strategies for contacting and engaging the audience(s) including how the public consultation(s) will be advertised.

The applicant may choose to communicate through in-house publications; on-line information (website, emails, social networks, open data, digital engagement); open houses; stakeholder working groups (including residents, local business associations, special interest associations); workshops; focus group interviews; store fronts; surveys; questionnaires; on-line comments such as blogs, forums etc.

The Communications Strategy will outline how the public will be informed with regard to major milestones (such as major revisions) related to the proposal.

8.  Evaluation – Feedback and Next Steps

The applicant will provide an evaluation of the public consultation held and make this evaluation available to the public consultation process participants at the conclusion of the public consultation period, prior to the Development Application proceeding to Council for approval or refusal.

Terms/Advisory Comments

For the purposes of this Terms of Reference, a demographic profile means:

  • A census based and related summary overview of socio-economic characteristics of the population living and working within the geographic area impacted by the proposal which includes the following indicators: age, sex, education level, income level, home language, household size, housing tenure and type – gathered and extrapolated from available information to provide a “snapshot” of the population impacted by the proposal.

For the purposes of this Terms of Reference, the “public” means:

  • The aggregate of the types of individuals living and working within the geographic area that may be impacted by the proposal. (See Data Source examples below).
  • The types of identified associations representing community interests within the geographic area that will need to be consulted about the proposal, including, when applicable, associations with a city-wide mandate that encompass geographically based community interests.

The public can include:

  • Residents and neighbourhood associations tenants associations; community networks; BIAs; business/employment associations; community service and facilities establishments; housing and social service agencies; school boards; heritage preservation groups, etc.

For the purposes of this Terms of Reference, geographic impact means:

  • The effect of the proposal or the indirect repercussions of the proposal on existing land use, social or economic conditions at both the local neighbourhood and at the citywide scale.
  • The minimum geographic area of impact will be 120 metres around the proposal (being the prescribed minimum notice area in the Planning Act)
  • the applicant will be encouraged to look beyond this minimum in considering impacts related to the scale and nature of the proposal on existing built form, traffic, parking, hard and soft services and facilities; affordable housing supply; parkland and natural and built heritage; etc.

The applicant may apply information gathered from other complete application submission studies (such as the Community Services/Facilities Study / the Housing Issues Study / the Traffic Operations Study, the Building Mass Study, the Sun/Shadow Study), when applicable, in preparing the Public Consultation Strategy Report for the application.

Data Source Examples

Statistics Canada Data Sources:

  • Statistics Canada’s 2016 Census Profile webpage provides population profiles for local geographic areas. Statistics Canada’s GeoSearch tool is an interactive mapping application used to find local geographic areas such as Census Tracts and Dissemination Areas for which Census data are available.  The geographic codes returned by GeoSearch can be used to obtain 2016 Census Profiles.

Statistics Canada GeoSearch

2016 Census Profile


City of Toronto Data Sources:

Wellbeing Toronto

 

Data, Research, Maps, Neighbourhood Profiles

Data, Research & Maps

City Stats in Detail

Planning & Development – Research Reports

Neighbourhood Profiles

 

TDSB Data:

Toronto District School Board Census Publications

Notification Instructions

  1. City Planning staff and the Ward Councillor will be invited to all public consultation meetings/events/activities held by the applicant once the applicant’s complete application submission has been received by the City.
  2. City Planning staff and the Ward Councillor will be made aware of all applicant initiated on-line and social media public consultation efforts as well as traditional face to face, voice to ear and print interactions, once the applicant’s complete application submission has been received by the City.
  3. City Planning staff will inform the applicant as to whether they will attend the applicant’s public consultation meeting/event/activity and, if so, will identify themselves at the start of the activity as observers, participants, or co-presenters or facilitators, as the case may be.
  4. City Planning staff, the Ward Councillor and the public will be notified of any public consultation meetings/events/activities a minimum of 10 days prior to the commencement of the activity.

Note Taking Instructions

  1. Meeting/event notes for all applicant-led public consultation meetings/events/activities that occur once a complete application is submitted, will be provided to City Planning staff within one week of the date of the activity/meeting.
  2. Meeting/event notes should include contact information for attendees/participants representing any associations; community network groups; agencies; special interest groups etc.
  3. Meeting/event notes should identify the number of participants, the nature and type of meeting/event, the location/type of platform (physical space and/or on-line) where the meeting/event took place and a brief summary of meeting/event outcomes.

Pre-Application Consultation

The applicant is also encouraged to provide City Planning staff with meeting/activity notes stemming from meetings/activities held with the public prior to submission to the City of the complete application submission.

AODA Compliance

Public consultation meetings/activities will be aligned with the requirements of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) and the City’s commitment to creating an accessible city

Link to Guide to Conducting Accessible Meetings

A Public Utilities Plan should be submitted as a separate plan, and as a grayed out underlay on the Landscape Plan.

General Details

  • Existing and proposed utilities, transformers, gas regulators, on site and adjacent road allowance
  • Existing catch basins, curbing, light standards
  • Plans to show entire or full width of the right-of-way
  • All existing underground utilities and services in the municipal right of way fronting the subject site (sewer/watermains, underground utilities);
  • All above ground utilities and services in the municipal right of way fronting the site (hydro vaults, hydro poles, communication pedestals, etc.);
  • All existing and proposed services including sewers and watermains within private property;
  • All private and municipal easements and encroachments
  • Trees to be retained and protected
  • Water and electrical service size and location for park block conveyances
  • Location and dimensions of tree protection zones for all trees that are to be retained
  • All General Notes should reference current City of Toronto Standards or Ontario Provincial Standards; all pipes, manholes, valves, hydrants, etc. should be clearly labeled and illustrated on the plan; the meter room or meter chamber location should be shown on the drawing. If individual meters are being used then the approximate location of the meter should also be shown; The siamese connection(s) should also be illustrated on the plan; Control manholes should be shown completely on the private side within the private property
  • The underground utility information illustrated on the survey should be determined to a Subsurface Utility Mapping/Engineering Quality Level B based on American Society of Civil Engineers Standard ASCE 38-02

Scale

  • Metric Scale
  • Must be drawn to a standard scale (i.e. 1:100, 1:200, 1:500)

Green Roof By-law

  • Complete green roof statistics for the development. Please refer to the City of Toronto Green Roof By-law for more details.
  • Green Roof Plan may be on a separate drawing at the same scale

Toronto Green Standard

  • If the proposal is subject to the requirements of the Toronto Green Standard, the applicant is required to illustrate compliance. Please refer to the Tier 1 of Toronto Green Standard for details.

General Details

  • Dimensions and height of all rooftop mechanical equipment, renewable energy devices, penthouses and amenity space
  • Proposed rooftop landscaping cross-section and details, including green roofs and/or cool roofs
  • Details of proposed screening of rooftop equipment
  • Complete green roof by-law statistics in table form (if applicable) including total roof area, available roof space as defined in the green roof by-law, required green roof area, green roof area provided

Public & Private Servicing Information

  • Proposed roof control devices and proposed release rates for flat roof portions
  • All related storm water management information (number and type of roof drains, ponding depths, volume required and stored, etc.
  • Proposed storage volume, ponding area and depths for stormwater management purpose where applicable
    Storage facilities and details for rainwater harvesting and reuse e.g. Cisterns

Landscaping, Grading & Retaining Walls and Lighting

  • Species lists for planted roofs
  • Roof lighting details (no spotlighting or vanity lighting)

Description

  • To determine the overall impact on the trunk and local municipal service capacities, such as: water treatment plant, water distribution systems and pressure zones, pump stations, wastewater treatment plants, trunk sewers and stormwater management facilities, etc. due to the proposed change in land use or development.
  • To determine the necessary improvements to municipal servicing infrastructure required to support the proposed level of development.
  • To determine mitigation measures to minimize any negative impacts.

When Required

A Servicing Report is required for the following application types:

  • Zoning By-law Amendment
  • Plans of Subdivision
  • Plans of Condominium
  • Consent to Sever
  • Site Plan Control Applications

Rationale

Objective

The objective of a Servicing Report is to evaluate the effects of a proposed change in land use or development on the City’s municipal servicing infrastructure and watercourses. The report should also address the adverse impacts, if any, of providing this servicing on any environmentally sensitive features (e.g., Areas of Natural and Scientific Interest, Environmental Sensitive Areas and hydrologically sensitive areas). The report also identifies and provides the rationale for any new infrastructure and upgrades to existing infrastructure necessary to provide for adequate servicing to the proposed change in land use or development.

Format

A Servicing Report is prepared by a Registered Professional Engineer qualified in municipal engineering. The report must include sufficient details for City staff to determine the financial and infrastructure implications of servicing the proposed development. The submission must include reports, plans (e.g., engineering, drainage area, etc.), computer modelling results and design calculations relating to the designs and upgrades of municipal services.

Process

A Servicing Report is to be submitted in conjunction with the development application.  The applicant is encouraged to discuss the need and scope for a study and design assumptions of the proposed servicing schemes with City staff prior to preparing the study.

An Environmental Impact Study may also be required to address the impact of development on water resources features or functions on and off site.

Principles

A Servicing Report must be based on established municipal engineering design principles, applicable guidelines (e.g., Ministry of the Environment guidelines), regulations and by-laws, and infrastructure information available from the City.  Particular attention should be paid to the City’s Sewer Use By-law (By-law 457-2000) and the objectives under the Water Efficiency Plan and the Wet Weather Flow Management Policy.

The authority to request this work is provided by the Planning Act, the Official Plan, the Provincial Policy Statement, the Council approved Wet Weather Flow Management Policy and Chapter 681 of the Municipal Code – Sewer.

Required Contents

A Servicing Report must address following components:

  • Water Consumption – estimated consumption, current capacities of trunk systems, phasing, net impact due to the proposed change in land use or development, need for expansion and upgrades.
  • Sanitary Sewage – estimated discharge, current capacities of trunk systems, net impact due to the proposed change in land use or development, need for expansion and upgrades.
  • Storm Drainage – For Official Plan Amendment & Zoning By-law Amendment: equivalent to a Preliminary Stormwater Management Report (see Stormwater Management Report Terms of Reference), estimated volume of run-off, opportunities and options for attenuation and infiltration, concepts for quality control of run-off, current capacities of trunk systems (i.e., storm sewers and watercourses), net impact due to the proposed change in land use or development, need for expansion and upgrades. For Plans of Subdivision, the storm drainage issues will be addressed in accordance with the Stormwater Management Report requirements set out in the Stormwater Management Terms of Reference.
  • Phasing of development and construction staging.
  • Financial implications of infrastructure expansion and upgrades.

The report includes the following information:

  1. Location map of the subject property
  2. Property description
  3. Present owner contact
  4. Information on the magnitude of the proposed development, including preliminary site, lots and street layouts, etc.
  5. Basic design assumptions and parameters
  6. Information related to existing surface and underground storm, sanitary and water services (e.g., location, size, grade and invert elevations, etc.)
  7. Supporting calculations such as sanitary sewer design calculations
  8. Identify upgrades to existing infrastructure required to support the proposed development
  9. Plans and profiles of sewers in an appropriate scale
  10. The proposed basement and ground floor elevations of all buildings to be constructed

Comments

The level of detail for the Servicing Report depends on the type of application and the size of the development. For example, a report for an Official Plan or Zoning By-law Amendment will be more conceptual compared with a report for Plans of Subdivision, which will include more details.

Scale

  • Metric Scale
  • Must be drawn to a standard scale (i.e. 1:100, 1:200, 1:500)

Toronto Green Standard

  • If the proposal is subject to the requirements of the Toronto Green Standard, the applicant is required to illustrate compliance. Please refer to the Tier 1 of the Toronto Green Standard for details.

General Details

  • All property lines must be shown
  • Ground floor plan for all buildings must be shown
  • Ravine by-law limit, if applicable
  • All easements, and reserves

Site Circulation, General Parking, Accessible Parking and Driveways

  • All adjacent roads and sidewalks must be shown

Public & Private Servicing Information

  • The location of proposed utilities, transformers, gas regulators, air intakes/exhausts, garage access stairs on the site and on adjacent road allowances must be shown
  • Proposed roof control devices location, type, control release rates and corresponding storage volumes for flat roof portions
  • UV treatment facilities and/or oil grit separators
  • Storage facilities and dimensions/details for rainwater harvesting and reuse (e.g. Cisterns)

Landscaping, Grading & Retaining Walls and Lighting

  • All retaining walls must be shown
  • General grading information including the existing and proposed elevations at six metre intervals along property lines, driveways, sidewalks and walkways and trees to be preserved, including all trees on adjacent properties within six metres of subject site’s property/lot lines
  • Proposed elevation at  sixmetre intervals along all building and structure perimeters and building entrances
  • Storm and surface water drainage directions, site ponding limits with corresponding control volumes and control facilities, major overland and emergency overland flow routes
  • Soil retention and/or replacement details
  • Sediment and erosion control measures applied during construction
  • Location and identification of trees protected under City by-laws
  • Location of tree protection zones (where trees are being retained & protected)
  • Tree protection plan notes (where trees are being retained & protected)
  • Buried watercourses, if applicable

Scale

  • Metric Scale
  • Must be drawn to a standard scale (i.e. 1:100, 1:200, 1:500)

Development Statistics

  • Site and project statistics

Toronto Green Standard

  • Complete the Toronto Green Standard statistics template for the development and place it on the Site Plan drawing. Please refer to the Tier 1 of the Toronto Green Standard for details.

General Details

  • Showing the proposed development including the outline of all retained and proposed buildings. Include all property lines, abutting roads and footprints of buildings and driveway locations on adjacent lots
  • Overhanging buildings and above grade structures, roof and upper storey projections
  • All building setbacks, including those for underground garages

Easements, Reserves, Widenings

  • Illustrate all existing and proposed reserves, easements (including type of easement) or widenings

Waste Disposal Facilities

  • Location and dimensions for all loading, moving and service areas
  • Location of and details of facilities for at grade storing and handling of garbage, recyclable material and organic waste

General Parking/Accessible Parking and Driveways

  • Dimensions of at-grade parking, including occupant, accessible, visitor and carpool or car share spaces and isles along with rough-ins for electrical conduits
  • Details of accessible ramps, if applicable
  • Location and dimensions including width, turning radii, height, gradient and surface material for all hard landscaped surfaces including vehicle access, driveways and ramps
  • Location and content of any traffic signs
  • Shade trees or other shade devices in surface parking areas

Fire Code Requirements

  • Location of existing/proposed fire hydrants located within the municipal boulevard and/or on the subject property, existing and proposed fire routes, and existing/proposed siamese connection location(s), if required

Pedestrian & Bicycle Infrastructure

  • Location, dimensions and details for pedestrian sidewalks, steps, ramps and curbs
  • Location and dimensions of bicycle parking spaces
  • At grade areas for bicycle storage
  • All publicly accessible areas within the building and the property
  • Covered main entrances and waiting areas
  • Direction and distance to nearest public transit stop

Public & Private Servicing Information

  • Existing and proposed sanitary and stormwater sewers, drains, catch basins, siamese connections and curbing, sanitary/stormwater/water service connections, hydrants, hydro poles, pad mount transformers, light standards and on-site traffic or way-finding signage
  • Existing and proposed underground structures, including transformer vaults, access ramps, vents and stairs, underground tanks
  • Location, type and porosity (<2cmx2cm) of ventilation and other grates
  • Lighting design for public and private property installations

Landscaping, Grading & Retaining Walls, and Lighting

  • Proposed site lighting, ground signs, audio speakers, fences and retaining walls including the public boulevards adjacent to the site
  • Location, dimensions and details of any watercourses and, of existing trees (including all trees within the public right-of-way and on adjacent properties within six metres of subject site’s lot lines) to be retained and protected in accordance with applicable by-laws
  • Details of tree protection measures
  • Spot elevations to assess relationship between the proposed development and abutting lands or roads
  • Identify grade, as per applicable zoning by-law
  • Any significant feature or delineation lines such as flood lines, fill lines, limits of buffer zones as they relate to natural heritage
  • Ravine by-law limit, if applicable and location of trees to be retained
  • Location and planting details for proposed trees and other plantings
  • 10 metre setback or buffer area, if applicable

Scale

  • Metric Scale
  • Must be drawn to a standard scale (i.e. 1:100, 1:200, 1:500)

Toronto Green Standard

  • If the proposal is subject to the requirements of the Toronto Green Standard, the applicant is required to illustrate compliance. Please refer to the Tier 1 of the Toronto Green Standard for details.

General Details

  • All property lines
  • Names of adjacent right-of-way(s)
  • Heights of the proposed buildings and penthouses in both metres and storeys
  • Current permitted height and angular plane requirements of the zoning by-law
  • Show all elevations of the proposed development (dimensioned and in context) taken along the property lines.
  • Show development in context of adjacent properties and right-of-way(s)
  • Identify floor levels on each storey.
  • Show and label exterior building design features and materials, including window type, entrances, canopies, balconies, cornices, arcades, roof line and rooftop equipment etc.
  • (For new buildings 1,000 square metres or greater) Show location of signage as part of recognition of the Architect of Record, or primary Design Architect of the building. The lettering for this recognition must cover an area of at least 0.2m by 0.3m, or 0.06 square metres located near the main entrance or prominent façade of the structure.

Landscaping, Grading & Retaining Walls and Lighting

  • Spot elevations (Canadian Geodetic Datum) for all natural and artificial significant features and along the boundary of the site and in adjacent right-of-way(s)
  • Location of all natural heritage features; including vegetation, canopy edge, open spaces, watercourses, flood lines, fill lines, physical top-of-bank and buffer zones on the site and adjacent right-of-way(s)
  • Location of all artificial features; including municipal appurtenances, lighting, retaining walls (top and bottom of wall), stairs (top and bottom of stairs), ramps & other grade change features, driveways, parking lots, walkways, trails & sidewalks and landscape structures & furnishings on the site and adjacent right-of-way(s)
  • Location of all existing and proposed trees including trees on adjacent properties within six metres of the subject property lines

Scale

  • Metric Scale
  • Must be drawn to a standard scale (i.e. 1:100, 1:200, 1:500)

Toronto Green Standard

  • If the proposal is subject to the requirements of the Toronto Green Standard, the applicant is required to illustrate compliance. Please refer to the Tier 1 of the Toronto Green Standard for details.

General Details

  • All property lines
  • Names of adjacent right-of-way(s)
  • Show at least two dimensioned site & building cross-sections (in opposite directions).
  • Show development in context of adjacent properties and right-of-way(s)

Landscaping, Grading & Retaining Walls and Lighting

  • Spot elevations (Canadian Geodetic Datum) for all natural and artificial significant features and along the boundary of the site and in adjacent right-of-way(s)
  • Location of all natural heritage features; including vegetation, canopy edge, open spaces, watercourses, flood lines, fill lines, physical top-of-bank and buffer zones on the site and adjacent right-of-way(s)
  • Location of all artificial features; including municipal appurtenances, lighting, retaining walls (top and bottom of wall), stairs (top and bottom of stairs), ramps & other grade change features, driveways, parking lots, walkways, trails & sidewalks and landscape structures & furnishings on the site and adjacent right-of-way
  • Location of all existing and proposed trees including trees on adjacent properties within six metres of the subject property lines

Description

  • To identify the quality and quantity impacts of the change in stormwater runoff on existing infrastructure and watercourses due to a proposed development.
  • To determine improvements to municipal servicing infrastructure required to support the proposed level of development, where applicable
  • To determine mitigation measures to minimize any negative impacts on the drainage system.
  • To identify opportunities for enhancement of stormwater management facilities and features in redevelopment sites.

When Required

A Stormwater Management Report is required for the following application types:

  • Zoning By-law Applications
  • Plans of Subdivision
  • Plans of Condominium
  • Consent to Sever
  • Site Plan Control applications

Rationale

Objective

The objective of a Stormwater Management Report is to evaluate the effects of a proposed development on the stormwater and drainage system, and to recommend how to manage rainwater/snowmelt for the proposed development, consistent with the City’s Wet Weather Flow Management Policy and while also meeting TRCA, provincial and federal regulations.

Format

A Stormwater Management Report is prepared by a Registered Professional Engineer qualified in municipal engineering/stormwater management, and must include all appropriate reports, plans, computer modeling results and design calculations relating to how storm run-off is to be managed.

  • Regardless of the size or nature of the proposed development, the consultant is responsible for providing a SWM report that strictly complies with the requirements of the WWFM Guidelines. If the consultant feels that a specific development should be exempt from any or all SWM requirements based on the type/size of development as provided for in the WWFM Guidelines, he/she must still submit a report (in some cases a letter report is acceptable) clearly referencing the relevant section(s) in the WWFM Guidelines and how they apply to the proposed development.

Process

A Stormwater Management Report is to be submitted in conjunction with the development application. The applicant is encouraged to discuss the need, scope and the proposed stormwater management concepts and design assumptions with City staff prior to preparing the report. The report is to be submitted in two stages. For complex Site Plan Control applications, the Stage 1 and Stage 2 reports are to be submitted in conjunction with the development application and must be accepted prior to Site Plan approval.

Stage 1

The Stage 1 Report outlines the design assumptions and conceptual engineering schemes to manage both quantity and quality of run-off. The Stage 1 Report is to be submitted when the application is initiated and must be accepted prior to draft plan approval of a Plan of Subdivision or a prior to the acceptance of a Rezoning application if it is being submitted in conjunction with a site plan application.

Stage 2

The Stage 2 Report provides the detailed calculations and the design of the stormwater management facilities and drainage systems based on the accepted principles in the Preliminary Report, and must be accepted prior to, or in conjunction with, the final acceptance of the engineering drawings.

For Site Plan Control applications, the Stage 2 Report is to be submitted in conjunction with the development application and must be accepted prior to site plan approval.

An Environmental Impact Study may be required to address the impact of development on water resources features or functions on and off site that may not be included in a Natural Heritage Impact Study (see EIS Terms of Reference).

An Environmental Impact Study may also be required to address the impact of development on water resources features or functions on and off site.

Principles

A Stormwater Management Report must be based on:

  • established stormwater management principles,
  • best management practices,
  • the Ministry of the Environment Policies and design guidelines
  • the Wet Weather Flow (WWF) Management Policy and
  • Wet Weather Flow (WWF) Management Guideline (Interim, Nov. 2006).

The use of the rational method shall be used as per the WWF Guideline. Further analysis may be required for areas basement flooding and high infiltration as per the WWF Policy. Refer to the Wet Weather Flow Master Plan for more details.

The authority to require this work is provided by the Planning Act, the Provincial Policy Statement, the Official Plan, the Wet Weather Flow Management Policy and Chapter 681 of the Municipal Code – Sewer.

Required Contents

The level of detail for the Stormwater Management Report depends on the type and scope of application, the size of the development and the types of stormwater management schemes proposed. For example, a report for a Plan of Subdivision will typically be more complex than a report in support of a Site Plan Control application.

A Stormwater Management Report must include the basic quantity and quality assumptions upon which the report is based, and all appropriate functional plans of infrastructure elements for major and minor flow, which could have an impact on the layout of the Plan of Subdivision or site and building design.

These infrastructure elements may include stormwater management facilities, all water resources features and functions (i.e., watercourses, riparian areas, recharge/discharge areas), existing overland flow routes, surface features (i.e., top of bank of valleys) and existing infrastructure (i.e., water and wastewater infrastructure and underground utilities).

Where a development proposal may impact a water resources features or function, the Stormwater Management Report must incorporate into the design the recommendations from the separate Environmental Impact Study referenced above.

The Stage 1 Report must provide sufficient engineering information to allow for the necessary review and acceptance of the proposed stormwater management schemes in principle.  This report should address the following:

  • Identify existing stormwater management requirements that apply specifically to the site.
  • Identify constraints and potential opportunities – quantitative, qualitative, erosion sensitivity and environmental concerns related to water resources for both interim and ultimate development conditions, both on and off site.
  • Identify the inlets (from upstream) and outlet (to downstream) for the minor and major systems, including overland flow routes.
  • Identify all internal and external drainage areas under existing and future development conditions for minor and major flows.
  • Demonstrate that the proposal has maximized source control measures to reduce runoff from the site and maximized conveyance control measures to infiltrate and/or treat run-off as appropriate consistent with water quantity and quality objectives and targets under the Wet Weather Flow Management Policy.
  • Indicate if off-site land or works are required to implement the stormwater management proposals and comment to what extent (e.g. easements, dedication, land acquisition, etc.)
  • Indicate the interim measures required for erosion, pond siltation and sedimentation, downstream works, riparian flow considerations, during the construction phase.
  • Indicate if other agencies are required to grant approvals or issue permits (such as TRCA if the project is within their jurisdiction) and provide proof of approvals.
  • Submit plans and calculations to support the proposals.

In addition, the Stage 1 report must include the following information:

  1. Location map of the subject property
  2. Property description
  3. Present owner contact
  4. An external drainage plan including all upstream lands and any diversion of drainage routes
  5. An internal drainage plan including flood and fill lines and overland flow routes
  6. Schematic layout of existing and proposed sanitary and storm sewer networks
  7. Schematic layout of the sub watershed showing the main watercourse, tributaries and trunk sewers
  8. Provide descriptions of pre-development and post-development conditions, statistics and respective storm release rates.
  9. Any supporting calculations, reports and drawings, such as:
    1. Calculation of surface run-off, the ponding elevation water elevations corresponding to the required level of controls
    2. Calculation of existing run-off coefficient and release rates
    3. Calculation of permissible release rate and required on site storage
    4. Methods of run-off attenuation and on site storage
    5. Measures to maintain or improve water quality
    6. Measures to minimize impact of run-off downstream including on erosion, flooding etc.
  10. Ontario Ministry of the Environment Certificate of Approval and related documents if applicable
  11. Geotechnical Study and Hydrological Review where applicable (see terms of reference)

The Stage 2 Report must include detailed analyses (computer modeling results and calculations) and design of the major and minor systems and proposed stormwater management facilities based on the proposed design concepts and parameters accepted in the Preliminary Report.

Contents

The Stormwater Management Report (Stage 2) must also include the following contents where applicable:

  • Separate site servicing and grading drawings
  • Storm and surface water drainage directions, major overland and emergency overland flow routes, site ponding limits with corresponding storage volumes and control facilities
  • Proposed roof control devices location, type, control release rates and corresponding storage volumes for flat roof portions
  • Storage volume calculation provided for all non-residential developments, residential developments greater than 0.5 hectares
  • Run-off co-efficient calculation for pre-development conditions for all non-residential developments, residential developments greater than 0.5 hectares upon request
  • Waster Harvesting process and all supporting calculations

Swales, Ditches, Channels, Inlet and Outlet Structures

  • Calculation and/or summary information to support erosive protection provided
  • Hydraulic calculations on sketches for proposed sections
  • Calculation of storage volumes for the required level of controls for surface and roof ponding areas
  • In-situ percolation rate test results for proposed infiltration/exfiltration facilities done at the proposed facility location

Subdivision Applications

Residential

  • Calculations for all high water level for all overland flow routes
  • Where traffic calming devices are proposed, calculations showing proposed high water levels for minor and major storms every 5m minimum up-stream of the device

Industrial  / Commercial / Mixed Use

  • Allowable discharge rates per site

Site Plan Applications

  • Schematic layout of roof drain controls and ponding volumes and corresponding level of controls when roof top controls are proposed
  • Report from qualified engineer on the flood proofing of reverse driveways

Drawings

Specific drawing requirements for stormwater management reports include:

  • Separate pre-development and post-development drainage area for all sites over five hectares
  • Separate pre-development and post-development drainage areas when a change to the drainage areas has been proposed
  • Major overland flow route(s)
  • Emergency overland flow routes for storm events beyond the specified major storm and in case of blockage or failure of the drainage system
  • Location of all flow controls, type of control, manufacturer, model number, sizing, number of weirs (where applicable), release rates and any other information specific to the control device (s)
  • High water elevations corresponding to the required level of controls

Swales, Ditches and Channels

  • Typical cross sections
  • Top of slope, bottom of slope, top of bank, flood limits for major storms
  • Spot elevations every 20m (We are using a 6m spacing on grading plans?) or as required for top of slope, bottom of slope, top of bank, flood limits, inverts and intermediate grades where applicable
  • Material specifications

SWM Facilities

  • Separate servicing and grading drawings
  • Maximum ponding elevations for major, minor and other relevant storms with respective storage volumes
  • Cross-sections of outlet channels where applicable
  • Cross-section(s) of facility
  • Details of erosion controls both temporary and permanent
  • Minimum 5m wide (excluding shoulders) access route for maintenance
  • Fencing, signage details
  • Landscaping plans and details
  • Schematic of water harvesting process

Site Plan Applications

  • General grading information including clearly discernible existing and proposed elevations at 6m intervals along property lines, driveways, sidewalks, walkways and trees to be preserved
  • Separate servicing and grading drawings except for single family residential units
  • Proposed elevations at 6m intervals along all building and structure perimeters and building entrances
  • Quality and quantity control devices including manufacturer, model number, size and release rates
  • Building finished floor elevations and door sill elevations
  • Ground surface and roof top ponding area limits and elevations for major and minor storms with respective storage volume provided
  • Water harvesting collection and inlet capacity

Subdivision Applications

  • External drainage area with inlet and outlet locations
  • Separate erosion control plans for construction and permanent conditions
  • Building finished floor elevations and door sill elevations
  • Separate drawings for pre-development and post-development drainage areas
  • Storm drainage area for minor and major flows
  • General grading directions including minor and major overland flow routes
  • Emergency overland flow routes for storm events beyond the specified major storm and in case of blockage or failure of the drainage system

Comments

The level of detail for the Stormwater Management Report depends on the type of application, the size of the development and the types of stormwater management schemes proposed.

Scale

  • Metric Scale
  • Must be drawn to a standard scale (i.e. 1:100, 1:200, 1:500)

Plan Layout

  • Showing the proposed layout of street, parks, blocks and lots showing conceptual footprints of buildings

Conceptual Landscaping

  • The conceptual landscape plan includes all existing trees to be preserved as well as new plantings, including public street planting, schematic park layout, other landscape features

Note: At the time of Draft plan approval, a District Landscape Plan and Architectural Control Guidelines may be secured.

Description

A technical document that provides a visual model and written description of the impact of shadows cast by a proposed development on neighbouring streets, parks and open space, (including natural areas), privately managed publicly accessible spaces and other properties. These studies are done to evaluate the impact of shadows at various times of day, through the year.

When Required

A Sun/Shadow Study may be required for the following applications for developments over 20 metres (6 storeys) in height:

  • Zoning By-law Amendments
  • Site Plan Control applications (Complex applications only)

Sun/shadow tests may also be requested for developments that are lower than 20 metres, in particular on rezoning applications where additional height is applied for near shadow sensitive areas (such as parks, schoolyards, cemeteries, etc.). The requirement for, and scope of this work, should be discussed with the Planner and Urban Designer in pre-application consultation meetings.

Rationale

To achieve the goals of Official Plan Policies:

3.1.2.3 “New development will be massed and its exterior façade will be designed to fit harmoniously into its existing and/or planned context, and will limit its impact on neighbouring streets, parks, open spaces and properties by:

  1. e) adequately limiting any resulting shadowing of, and uncomfortable wind conditions on, neighbouring streets, properties and open spaces, having regard for the varied nature of such areas; and

f) minimizing any additional shadowing and uncomfortable wind conditions on neighbouring parks as necessary to preserve their utility.”

Required Contents

The applicant may be requested to submit a proposed and final shadow study. Sun/shadow testing of alternative building massing may be required during the application review to assist in making decisions about how to best achieve Council’s goals regarding sun/shadow impacts. When the massing of the application has been agreed to, a final Sun/Shadow Study will be prepared to the following standards:

The Model

A typical model will include all streets, blocks, parks and open spaces as well as buildings to a distance adequate to show the shadow impacts during requested times.

Modeling will have two parts, the first showing the existing situation and the second showing the proposed development in its context. The proposed development context should include other approved but not built buildings within the model area. These should be indicated graphically as different from the proposal and the built context.

Shadow diagrams should be plotted in colour to a standard metric scale and include a bar scale on each sheet labelled in 1,2,5,10,20, 100 and 200m increments. A reference base plan should also be plotted at a metric standard scale.

“As of right” or other site specific applicable shadow conditions should be indicated clearly by a contrasting colour single-line overlay with explanatory notation provided in a printed legend (i.e., red for “as of right” on the subject property, yellow for approved but not yet built adjacent development).

Test Times

Sun/Shadow tests should be done for March 21 and September 21 at the following hours:

  • 9:18 a.m.
  • 10:18 a.m.
  • 11:18 a.m.
  • 12:18 p.m.
  • 1:18 p.m.
  • 2:18 p.m.
  • 3:18 p.m.
  • 4:18 p.m.
  • 5:18 p.m.
  • 6:18 p.m.

These times allow for the measuring of hours of sunlight windows as described in the Sun, Wind and Pedestrian Comfort Bosselmann/Dunker study.

Development that proposes additional shadow impacts on parks and open space, including natural areas, will require sun/shadow tests at hourly increments for both June 21 and December 21 to provide additional information on the impacts of shadows on these important public places.

Additional times may also be requested to respond to specific site contexts.

All times are based in the Eastern Time Zone and must take into account Daylight Saving Time.

Format of the Study

The final study will include:

  • A letter summarizing the study and the sun/shadow impacts of the proposed development and any and all measures that will be taken to minimize shadow impacts by the development on neighbouring streets, parks, open spaces, natural areas, public squares and other shadow sensitive properties (such as schoolyards, cemeteries, etc);
  • Images of sun/shadow tests using models, either real or digital, that clearly indicate the development site, its boundary, the foot print and mass of buildings within the test site, and any streets, parks and open spaces on/neighbouring this site; and
  • Images of the sun/shadow situation for the existing context and with the proposal (a single page or pages side by side are preferred as this will assist in understanding the impacts).
  • 8 bound paper copies of the study for distribution and review by appropriate agencies.
  • One digital copy of the development massing model.

Large mounted versions of critical times or power point images may be requested for public meetings.

Topographic Survey and Boundary Plan of Survey can be merged on to one plan or shown on separate plans. It must be recent and accurately reflecting the existing property.

Scale

  • Metric Scale
  • Must be drawn to a standard scale (i.e. 1:100, 1:200, 1:500) and preferably at same scale as Site Plan Drawing

General Details

  • Location of all vegetation, watercourses, natural features, artificial features; including municipal appurtenances and paved areas on or adjacent to the site
  • Municipal address of buildings on or adjacent to the site
  • Contour lines showing variations of 300 mm in ground elevations
  • Spot elevations (Canadian Geodetic Datum) for significant features and along the boundary of the site and in adjacent public boulevards
  • Location of existing above and below grade utilities within the adjacent street boulevard (Site Plan Control Applications only)
  • Location and grade of existing trees to be preserved (if appropriate) (Site Plan Control Applications only)
  • Location of all at grade, aerial and underground utilities including distribution lines and lateral service connections, on the public road allowances adjacent to the property
  • Location of existing easements and encroachments

The Toronto Green Standard (TGS) is a set of performance measures with supporting guidelines related to sustainable and resilient site and building design for new development. Tier 1 is required and Tier 2, 3 and 4 are voluntary, higher levels of performance. Tier 2 and above projects may be eligible for a refund on development charges paid to the City. The Toronto Green Standard website has more information on the full sets of standards, documentation requirements and information about the DC Refund program.

Compliance with the Toronto Green Standard is demonstrated through the submission of the checklist, statistics template and notations included on plans. The checklist indicates the Tier or level of performance that is being pursued and guides the applicant on how to effectively document the Toronto Green Standard requirements.

Checking off Tier 2, 3 or 4 on the Checklist triggers the circulation of the application to Environmental Planning, who administers the Development Charge Refund program, for project eligibility. The Toronto Green Standard checklist is part of a complete application and is completed in conjunction with the full Toronto Green Standard and specifications. The Checklist is prepared by the owner or the consultant depending on the nature of the application.

Rationale

The Toronto Green Standard is a tiered set of performance measures that address: air and water quality, greenhouse gas emissions, energy efficiency, solid waste and the natural environment. It provides an integrated set of targets, principles and practices for more sustainable and resilient new development.

Since January 31, 2010, new planning applications, including Zoning By-law Amendments, Site Plan Control and Draft Plan of Subdivision, are required to meet the Tier 1 environmental performance measures.

Developers may also choose to target Tier 2 3 or 4 voluntary higher level of environmental performance. Developments that meet Tier 1 and Tier 2 may be eligible for a Development Charge refund.

Toronto Green Standard Version 1 is no longer in effect and Version 2 applies to all planning applications submitted between January 1, 2014 and April 30, 2018. On December 5, 6 and 7 2017, Toronto City Council  adopted the Toronto Green Standard (TGS) Review and Update Report. The updates or “Version 3.0” of the Toronto Green Standard came into effect for new development applications under the Planning Act submitted on May 1, 2018. There is no grandfathering provision for Zoning By-law or other applications submitted prior to May 1.

Required Contents

Complete the following steps to demonstrate compliance of your application with the Toronto Green Standard:

  1. Complete the Toronto Green Standard Checklist that applies to your development type as part of your complete development application. Applications submitted on or after January 1, 2014 must be submitted with the applicable Toronto Green Standard Version 2.0 Checklist. Applications submitted on or after May 1, 2018 must be submitted with the applicable Toronto Green Standard Version 3 Checklist. The Checklist should be completed in full and include adequate detail to demonstrate achievement of the performance measures. The full Toronto Green Standard must be referred to when filling in each of the Checklists.
  2. Complete the Statistics Template that applies to your development type. For standalone Zoning By-law Amendment applications, only complete the statistics identified with an asterisk.
  3. Copy the completed Statistics Template directly onto the Project Statistics Plan submitted with the development application.
  4. Submit the completed TGS Checklist with your development application and all subsequent resubmissions.

Description

  • To analyze the potential traffic impact of a Site Plan Control application on existing/proposed access driveways and on-site vehicle circulation.
  • To determine any locations on the adjacent road network where potential operational concerns may occur and identify mitigating measures where required.

When Required

May be required for Site Plan Control applications that are particularly high traffic generating uses and/or when the site driveway operations could negatively impact the operations of abutting public streets.

May also be required for Zoning By-law Applications and Plans of Subdivision Applications.

Description

  • To establish the merits of a development and to assist in determining the justification for its approval.
  • To assess the transportation impact of a development.
  • To determine improvements to infrastructure, service upgrades and mitigation measures to reduce any negative impacts of a development.
  • To identify an appropriate travel demand management strategy.

When Required

A Transportation Impact Study may be required for the following application types:

  • Official Plan Amendment
  • Zoning By-law Amendment
  • Plans of Subdivision
  • Site Plan Control Application

Rationale

Objective

The objective of a Transportation Impact Study is not only to evaluate the effects of a development or re-development on the transportation system, but also to suggest any transportation improvements that are necessary to accommodate the travel demands and impacts generated by the development.

Format

A Transportation Impact Study is prepared by a qualified transportation consultant and must follow the Guidelines for the Preparation of Transportation Impact Studies published and updated periodically by the City.

Process

A Transportation Impact Study, when required, is to be submitted in conjunction with the development application. The applicant is encouraged to discuss the need for a study and its contents with City staff prior to preparing any study.

Principles

A Transportation Impact Study must be based on established transportation planning and traffic engineering principles and supplemented by any available local survey data or experience. The study has to demonstrate good planning principles cognizant of the Official Plan and Secondary Plan policies and objectives. It must provide a balanced approach between facilitating development and protecting stable areas.

It should also ensure equitable access to the transportation system by all users, including transit, pedestrians, cyclists, private automobiles and trucks. The overall goal is to integrate development with the existing and future transportation systems and to ensure the transportation supply and demand is optimized in a manner consistent with relevant policies, guidelines and criteria.

The Transportation Impact Study may also incorporate the requirements of the City’s Loading and Parking Studies.

The authority to request this work is Provided by Policy 2.4.2 of the City’s Official Plan.

Required Contents

A Transportation Impact Study should include the following information:

  1. Location plan of the subject property.
  2. Property description.
  3. Owner/Consultant contact.
  4. Transportation context for horizon year and time periods for analysis.
  5. Estimate of travel demand generated by different development scenarios.
  6. Evaluation of transportation impacts of site-generated traffic/transit demands.
  7. Identification of transportation system improvements required to mitigate adverse impacts.
  8. Assessments of parking and access issues.
  9. Supporting data used in the analyses.

Refer to Guidelines for the Preparation of Transportation Impact Studies for further details, including criteria governing the need for this study.

The Tree Preservation Plan is typically submitted in conjunction with an Arborist/Tree Preservation Report.

Scale

  • Metric Scale
  • Must be drawn to a standard scale (i.e. 1:100, 1:200, 1:500)

Toronto Green Standard

  • If the proposal is subject to the requirements of the Toronto Green Standard, the applicant is required to illustrate compliance. Please refer to the Tier 1 of the Toronto Green Standard for details.

General Details

  • All property lines, abutting roads and existing and proposed buildings on the site and on adjacent lots (as applicable)
  • Location, size, number and species of all City owned trees, all trees situated within ravine protected areas and all private trees with a diameter of 30cm (measured 1.4m above ground) or greater including trees on the subject site or on adjacent property within six meters of subject site
  • Identify trees to be removed
  • Identify trees to be retained and protected
  • Location and dimensions of tree protection zones for all trees that are to be retained
  • Location, size, number and species of existing trees to be retained/protected (including trees on adjacent properties within 6 metres the subject site’s property/lot lines) and specific identification of retained trees
  • Tree protection plan notes for trees being protected including those in ravine protected areas, adjacent to City of Toronto streets and roadways and City-owned Parkland

Scale

  • Metric Scale
  • Must be drawn to a standard scale (i.e. 1:100, 1:200, 1:500)

Toronto Green Standard

  • If the proposal is subject to the requirements of the Toronto Green Standard, the applicant is required to illustrate compliance. Please refer to the Tier 1 of the Toronto Green Standard for details.

General Details

  • Vestibules, steps, ramps and grades at access to stairs and elevators

Waste Disposal Facilities

  • Details of below-grade facilities for storing and handling of garbage and recyclable and organic materials

Site Circulation, General Parking, Accessible Parking and Driveways

  • Number of parking spaces at each level
  • Garage door height, garage ceiling heights, heights above parking and loading spaces
  • Dimensions and layout of all parking spaces, accessible parking spaces and aisles, carpool or car share spaces and rough-ins for electrical conduits
  • Illustration of any fixed object situated within 0.3 m of the side of a parking space (measured at right angles) such as, but not limited to, a wall, column, bollard, fence or pipe
  • Designation of spaces for visitors, occupants/tenants
  • The locations and dimensions of support columns relative to adjacent underground parking stalls
  • Ramp slopes to underground parking should be identified
  • Location of convex mirrors
  • Location and content of any traffic signs

Pedestrian & Bicycle Infrastructure

  • Below-grade bicycle parking spaces and areas for bicycle storage

Public & Private Servicing Information

  • Dimensions and layout of below-grade areas for loading, moving or servicing

Landscaping, Grading & Retaining Walls and Lighting

  • Details of lighting and other security features

Description

Urban Design Guidelines are a written and graphic text that describes how the streets, parks, open space, buildings, built form and landscape elements of a new development will work together to create a new neighbourhood that supports the overall goals defined by the Official Plan and through the public planning process.

The Guidelines outline and illustrate how the Official Plan urban design goals and objectives for the public realm and built form will be achieved within the specific site and its relationships to the surrounding area. They will also provide specific, actionable and measurable directions for development to achieve these goals.

The Guidelines address the whole of the new neighbourhood, including abutting streets, parks and open space. The Guidelines are a combination of text, plans, illustrative sketch diagrams and photos, street and block sections, and massing models or examples that inform the proponent, public and City about the physical form, layout and design of the new neighbourhood. The Guidelines will be flexible to accommodate change as it occurs while maintaining intact the essential urban ideas.

When Required

Urban Design Guidelines may be required for:

  • Zoning By-law Amendments;
  • Plans of Subdivision applications for the development of large sites; or
  • Site Plan Control Applications.

The requirement for, and scope of, the Urban Design Guidelines should be discussed with the Planner and Urban Designer in pre-application consultation meetings. Urban Design Guidelines will likely be required for applications incorporating large land areas with a number of parcels or phases within a development, new streets and parks and sites of civic prominence.

Rationale

To achieve the goals of Official Plan Policies:

3.3.1 “New neighbourhoods will have a comprehensive planning framework reflecting the Plan’s city-wide goals as well as the local context. The framework should include:

a) the pattern of streets, development blocks, open spaces and other infrastructure

b) the mix and location of land uses

c) a strategy to provide parkland and to protect, enhance or restore natural heritage

d) a strategy to provide community service

e) a strategy to provide affordable housing”

3.3.2 “New neighbourhoods will be viable as communities. They should have:

a) a community focal point within easy walking distance of the neighbourhood’s residents and workers

b) a fine grain of interconnected streets and pedestrian routes that define development blocks

c) a mix of uses and a range of building types

d) high quality parks, community recreation centres, open space and public buildings

e) services and facilities that meet the needs of residents, workers and visitors”

3.3.3 “New neighbourhoods will be carefully integrated into the surrounding fabric of the City. They will have:

a) good access to transit and good connections to the surrounding streets and open spaces

b) uses and building scales that are compatible with surrounding development

c) community services and parks that fit within the wider system

d) a housing mix that contributes to the full range of housing”

Urban Design Guidelines are planning tools that:

  • Provide a context for coordinated incremental development by showing the proposed development in relationship to areas surrounding the site.
  • Provide a framework for the development of streetscape and park design initiatives.
  • Assist in evaluating individual applications as to their conformity to the larger goals of the Official Plan or Secondary Plan if applicable.

Required Contents

Urban Design Guidelines will consist of the following (with modifications as required):

Introduction and Background

  • Site location, size, existing conditions, heritage considerations and other planning considerations that have significant influence on the site layout and development should be inventoried, illustrated and acknowledged.

 Urban Design Ideas

  • An overall vision statement and images that describe the physical character of the new neighbourhood in terms that address the issues raised in Official Plan Policies 3.3.1 to 3.3.3
  • The urban ideas critical to the shaping of the new neighbourhood’s physical form.

Development Framework

The development framework is intended to be a guide to the form and layout of new streets and parks and to illustrate the relationship of buildings to this. This should include:

  • Structure Plan: a plan that describes the public realm of the new neighbourhood including the street layout, special streetscapes, open space network (public and private), possible building edges, special built form (i.e., built form for noise attenuation), heritage, landmark and civic building sites including community services, important views and vistas and gateway sites.
  • Circulation Plan: a plan that describes pedestrian, transit and different types of vehicular linkages through the site and to adjacent areas (private and public).
  • Development Diagrams: identify appropriate locations for different building types and provide general direction for building siting, organization and heights on development blocks. The location of private open space on the block should be included in these diagrams as well as the relationships of buildings to each other on a block and to adjacent streets and parks, to parking and servicing and to the concepts of the Circulation Plans. A complete set of street sections describing the relationship of buildings to the streets should be included.

The Guideline text addresses each component part, and each consists of two parts; a narrative or description of the urban design concept followed by specific guidelines to achieve the defined objective. The diagrams, photographs, sections and sketches that accompany the guidelines contribute further to understanding what is to be accomplished through urban design.

Final Guidelines will include:

  • Eight bound paper copies
  • One digital copy
  • Requests may be made for poster size prints for public meetings

Comments

The concept described here as Urban Design Guidelines have various names in individual Secondary Plans including the Concept Plan for the Railway Lands East, Urban Design Guidelines in the Railway Lands Central and Railway Lands West, Precinct Plans in the Waterfront Secondary Plan, and Context Plans within the Sheppard Corridor Plan. The specific policies within those Plans would govern the creation of the Urban Design Guidelines and should be referred to and discussed with the Planner and Urban Designer in pre-application consultation meetings.

In other areas of the city considered appropriate to use Urban Design Guidelines, but not specified within a Secondary Plan the following issues should be considered:

  • The applicant should develop draft Urban Design Guidelines as early as possible in the planning process with active participation by City staff. Urban Design Principles and a Community Structure Plan should be established in tandem with the subdivision plan and development layout.

Description

A technical report that provides a written description of the impact of vibration generated by a proposed development on the surrounding environment, the impact of vibration of the surrounding environment on the proposed development and the impact of vibration of the proposed development on itself as well as mitigation measures to reduce any negative impacts.

The report:

  • Describes the impacts of:
    • the anticipated vibration generated by a proposed development on the existing environment;
    • the vibration generated by the existing environment on the proposed development; and;
    • the anticipated vibration generated by the proposed development on itself.
  • Details all measures proposed to mitigate or reduce the anticipated negative vibration impacts.

This Vibration Study is to be prepared, on behalf of the applicant, by a Consultant that is either an accredited Acoustic expert or a qualified Professional Engineer.

When Required

Vibration Studies may be required to support  the following applications for developments:

  • Zoning By-law Amendment
  • Site specific zoning by-laws
  • Site Plan Control
  • Plans of Subdivision
  • Consent to Sever

Vibration Studies may also be a requirement of a site specific zoning by-law.

The requirement for a Vibration Study may be a condition of initial approval of the proposed development.

Rationale

Official Plan Section 2.2.4 (Policy 6) requires that development adjacent to or nearby Employment Districts should be appropriately designed, buffered and/or separated from industries as necessary to mitigate adverse affects including those from vibration to promote safety and security.

Official Plan Section 3.4 (Policy 21) refers to the possible requirement of a study in cases where uses such as airports, transportation/rail infrastructure, corridors and yards, waste management facilities and industries are adjacent to sensitive land uses such as residences, educational and health facilities to appropriately design, buffer, and/or separate the facilities and uses from each other to prevent adverse effects from vibration:

To assist in identifying impacts and mitigative measures, the proponent may be required to prepare studies in accordance with guidelines established for this purpose.  The proponent will be responsible for implementing any required mitigative measures.

In addition to sensitive land uses, the Official Plan in Section 4.6 (Policy 6(f)) deals with mitigation of the effects of noise among other things in order to create competitive, attractive, highly functional Employment Areas.

Required Contents

During pre-application consultation, City Planning staff will work with the applicant’s consultant to determine if such a report is required and, if so, the specific requirements of the Study based on the nature of the proposed application and the context of the study area.

The Study should include, but is not necessarily limited to:

  • Details of assessment criteria
  • Methods and assessment locations and the appropriate figures and charts showing the detailed results including how the development complies with the standard as reference in the policy document recommended by CNR and CPR in the case of new residential development adjacent to transportation/rail infrastructure induced vibration or other published criteria, guidelines and acceptable vibration levels at similar land uses in the City of Toronto;
  • Identification and analysis of the impact of all vibration from the proposed development on adjacent streets, parks and properties;
  • Identification and analysis of the impact of all vibration generated within the immediately surrounding area, including without limiting the foregoing, the operations of the airports, transportation/rail infrastructure, corridors and yards, waste management facilities, industries and other vibration generating uses on the proposed development;
  • An analysis of the impact of the proposed development on itself; and
  • Recommendations for vibration mitigation and any adjustments to the site plan and architectural design, as are necessary to comply with relevant regulations and standards.

Note: The City of Toronto may wish to hire an outside consultant, at the expense of the applicant, to peer review selected technical reports submitted in support of a development application where there is no in-house expertise available).