Additional Information Regarding SSHA’s 24-Hour Respite Sites RFP

 

 

 

Difference between a 24-hour respite site and a shelter

  • 24-hour respite sites are designed to broaden the range of services available to those experiencing homelessness. They provide essential supports which include meals, service referrals, and places to rest–all in an environment that prioritizes ease of admission to safe facilities.
  • Having these lower barriers makes respite sites more accessible, especially to those who are vulnerable and who may not otherwise access conventional shelter services.
  • Although they are lower barrier, 24-hour respite sites must adhere to 24-hour respite site interim standards and to the final standards that will be in place by November 2018.
  • There is no limit to how long clients can stay in a 24-hour respite site although operators are encouraged to incorporate wraparound services to help clients find permanent housing.
  • Emergency shelters are supervised residential facilities, operated by or for the City of Toronto which provide short-term emergency accommodation and associated support services. These serve individuals and families experiencing homelessness with or without a referral.

About 24-hour respite site locations

  • All sites will be accessible by 24 hour TTC, on a major or minor arterial road, and not within 250 meters of another shelter facility
  • If you have a new building or site you are bringing forward ready to become a 24-hour respite site, the review panel will conduct site visits to prospective buildings to determine adherence to the by-law and overall suitability of the building.
  • Operators can choose to put forward existing sites, prospective new sites, or to put in a proposal to operate one of the four temporary structures that the City has purchased for use as 24-hour respite sites for the coming winter.
  • Sites have not yet been finalized for these four temporary structures. Location information will be available as soon as possible.
  • The RFP allows proponents to make suggestions about where temporary structures are needed, and bring forward their own sites, provided they complete the additional Appendix C for the site.

About the temporary structures that will provide the facility for four new 24-hour respite sites

  • To be sited on available City-owned land or other designated locations.
  • The plan includes one in each of the east and west ends of the city and two in the general downtown area.
  • The construction/installation of these structures can be accomplished within 12-16 weeks of site approval.
  • Staff expect to have four sites in place by November 2018.
  • The City is on plan to deliver 1,000 net new beds into the permanent shelter system by 2020.
  • Meanwhile, to create additional 24-hour respite sites, City staff prioritized making sure there was sufficient available space and high standards of service for the 2018/2019 winter season.
  • Supplementing existing respite site locations with temporary structures was identified as the best way to address the need to increase available respite spaces. These are AODA compliant, have full electrical and plumbing systems, and have year-round climate control. They can be installed in a relatively short period of time and are cost-effective to purchase, erect and operate.
  • Once an agency is chosen to operate one of these sites, there is limited discretion on the hard infrastructure (plumbing, electrical, storage laundry, etc.). However, the internal layout of the building is up to individual proponents’ discretion to adjust as they wish.
  • One of the benefits of these temporary structures is that they can be scaled up and down according to demand. If demand declines, the City could decommission one of the structures or repurpose it for other community uses.
  • Maximum capacity in the temporary structures will be 100.
  • Washroom facilities include seven showers, 10 toilets, two urinals and two universal washrooms.
  • Storage space is incorporated into the design of the temporary respite structures.
  • The food server area includes a counter and some cupboards.
  • Office space will comprise approximately 20 per cent of the 150 ft. by 60 ft. structure with an intake area on the ground floor and the main office in the mezzanine.
  • There will be plumbing and hook-up for the dishwasher and laundry equipment but service providers must purchase appliances.
  • SSHA is aware of the concerns regarding overdoses in the bathrooms. Discussions are underway with the designer of the temporary structures to ensure staff have access to the washrooms.
  • Security for 24-hour respite sites at the temporary structures may be provided by the City of Toronto or an agency can negotiate their own contract.  If the latter is preferred, include the amount in the budget.
  • There will be multiple access points to the temporary structures and while this may be a safety concern for some providers, note that program operators could address this by limiting access for entrances and exits.

  • 24-hour respite site operators can choose to make a proposal to continue to operate an existing site, to operate one of the temporary structures being purchased by the City, or to propose a new site altogether (an existing building, for example, or propose a site that could work with one of the temporary structures).
  • All programs are required to meet the interim 24-hour respite site standards.
  • There is no limit to the number of proposals an agency may put forward.
  • Agencies are encouraged to consider partnerships with other community agencies in making their proposals.
  • Operators currently providing services must apply through this RFP if they wish to extend contracts that end December 31, 2018; they may include existing locations and/or express an interest in operating a new site.
  • This RFP covers the operation of 24-hour respite site operations only.
  • Term is for one year.
  • A separate RFP/REOI may be forthcoming shortly regarding the provision of shelter services.
  • This RFP does not specify an exact budget amount.
  • It is up to new providers to draft a budget based on the suggested budget template attached to the RFP.
  • Lines may be added to the budget template in order to provide more detail on equipment and supplies required.
  • For existing providers, we suggest looking at current cost, annualize and adjust for site specific conditions.
  • Key elements in the RFP include:
    • All gender, 16 years and older, includes couples
    • Three full meals as well as healthy snacks and beverages throughout the day
    • Respite options (examples: cots/mats) along with clean linens as needed
    • Basic toiletries and hygiene products
    • A pet-friendly environment
    • A well-maintained, healthy, safe facility
    • Indoor temperatures that ensure client comfort
    • Adequate washroom and shower facilities
    • Program model that incorporates low barrier access and Harm Reduction
    • Specific priority groups can be targeted based on demonstrated need and gaps in the current system
    • Service partnerships to ensure wraparound services
    • Community engagement, responsiveness to community concerns: each respite site will follow a consistent community notification and engagement process and have a full-time staff person at each site dedicated to community relations, client programming and addressing local concerns
    • Offer work and support opportunities for peers
    • At a minimum projects will provide:
      • On-site services and/or referrals to health care and other supports
      • Harm reduction services including supplies and related supports
      • Assistance in accessing housing within a housing first framework

  • RFP is for a term of one year.
  • The budget is based on grant funding.
  • The budget should cover all operations, programming, services, rent, administration and overhead for the 24-hour respite site.
  • There is no capital funding for this RFP but there may be some funding for certain renovations and start up, covering equipment, supplies, furniture, etc.
  • It is up to proponents to design a proposed program focus ensuring that it relates to current trends, demonstrated needs and community priorities.
  • Any client input into the program description and approach would be valuable information to include in the body of the RFP.
  • On-site support and referrals are an expectation in all respite programs.
  • There are no word count limits for answers to questions in this RFP. All responses must be concise and complete, describing in a coherent manner the proposed program.
  • Occupancy costs directly related to 24-hour respite service provision should be allocated in the project rent line. This does not impact the overhead limit.  Reasonableness of costs will be assessed.
  • Rent costs for temporary structures will follow similar service agreements as other buildings that are city leased.
  • Minimum staffing model:
    • Manager: Position may be shared among multiple sites; does not need to be full time at the
    • Supervisors
    • Frontline staff: On site 24/7
    • Community Relations & Client Programming (1 FTE)
    • Housing workers/client intervention workers (2 FTE)
  • The following may be part of your staff complement, or you may subcontract these services. If part of your staff complement, please include them in the budget attached in Appendix E. If subcontracted, these costs will be negotiated separately with the Preferred Proponent(s).
    • Cleaners
    • Maintenance/property staff
    • Catering staff
  • Proponents should demonstrate capacity and commitment to hiring, training and supporting peers.
  • Proponents should provide staff with training in:
    • Harm reduction (providing non-judgmental, client-centered supports, understanding substance use, recognizing and responding to overdoses, and administering naloxone);
    • Indigenous cultural competency/cultural safety training;
    • Anti-racism/anti-oppression
    • LGBTQ2SI awareness and cultural competency
    • Conflict resolution, crisis prevention, and de-escalation
    • Health and safety
    • AODA customer service
    • Standard first aid and CPR
    • Pet first aid
    • Documentation
    • SMIS
  • Regarding security: proponents are encouraged to include security in their budget. For programs NOT in the temporary structures, it is up to agencies to outsource security.
  • Temporary structures being purchased by the City can choose to access to City security resources.
  • For the temporary structures, agencies are responsible for utilities, taxes, water, cleaning, snow clearing and other daily maintenance matters pertaining to the area.
  • For the temporary structures, the City will be responsible for costs associated with mechanical and maintenance of the structure and its systems.
  • Providers are to incorporate in their budgets a contracted laundry service for bedding etc. and provide washing and drying machines for client use.