Over the entire three-year pilot, residents voted for 37 projects worth a total of $1,870,000.

  • Oakridge: 11 projects worth $625,000
  • Rustic: 12 projects worth $630,000
  • Ward 33: 14 projects $615,000

Residents shared ideas at local meetings, online and at community events, and ideas were then reviewed by City staff for eligibility.

To be eligible for consideration for the Participatory Budget ballot, ideas had to be:

  1. located on City-owned property
  2. a capital project (that means “a thing,” not operating funding for staffing or programs)
  3. located in one of the pilot areas
  4. reviewed by the City and determined to be:
    • able to be built within 18 months of the vote
    • $250,000 or under
    • technically feasible and/or best funded through the pilot project rather than through another program at the City.

After City staff identified which ideas were eligible for possible funding, residents in each pilot area selected up to 10 ideas for their PB ballot.

Any pilot-area resident over the age of 14 could vote for up to three projects on the ballot, even if they were not a Canadian citizen or registered for City, provincial or federal elections.

To vote for a project, participants filled in a circle on the ballot next to the title of the project(s) they liked. They did not rank their votes – in other words they did not put a 1, 2 or 3 beside their choices to indicate which project they liked more than another.

City staff counted the number of votes cast for each project. The project with the most votes was declared the winner, and the cost of that project was deducted from the available funds. The next most popular project that could be funded with any remaining dollars was then selected, and if there were any funds left, the next most popular project that could be fully funded with the remaining funds was selected.

No ideas were lost!  The projects on the ballot that are not chosen, and all of the ideas suggested at meetings and online, are shared with the local City Councillor and appropriate City division (such as Parks Forestry and Recreation or Transportation Services) so they can consider them for future funding.


Pilot Project Voting Results & Project Status Information by Neighbourhood

Toronto’s Participatory Budgeting in Action

The City collected ideas in different ways, including online. Local meetings brought neighbours together to hear and discuss ideas with each other and City staff.
The City collected ideas in different ways, including online. Local meetings brought neighbours together to hear and discuss ideas with each other and City staff.
City staff reviewed all ideas for eligibility, then invited residents back to “shortlist meetings” to discuss and choose which ideas made their local ballot for voting.
City staff reviewed all ideas for eligibility, then invited residents back to “shortlist meetings” to discuss and choose which ideas made their local ballot for voting.
Residents were invited to champion their favourite ideas to appear on the local ballot for voting.
Residents were invited to champion their favourite ideas to appear on the local ballot for voting.
Voting locations in community centres, libraries and other busy places attracted participation.
Voting locations in community centres, libraries and other busy places attracted participation.
Site meetings helped residents and City plan out exactly how the winning projects could be designed.
Site meetings helped residents and City plan out exactly how the winning projects could be designed.
Local impact! Residents gather to celebrate the opening of a winning PB project – a new outdoor fitness park.
Local impact! Residents gather to celebrate the opening of a winning PB project – a new outdoor fitness park.