From Study to Construction

  • Once an Envionmantal Assessment (EA) study is complete, the recommended basement flooding projects are sequenced into a five year project list which is presented on an annual basis to City Council
  • Projects are prioritized and scheduled to protect the greatest number of properties as soon as possible, within approved budgets and coordinated with other construction work — as per Council approved criteria
  • The length and type of construction will vary depending on the type of projects being implemented

Recommended solutions to reduce the risk of future flooding include mitigation measure(s) of one or more of the following:

  • larger sewer pipes
  • twinning of sewers
  • underground storage tanks
  • wet/dry ponds

Construction Project Prioritization

Not all recommended projects from the study will proceed immediately to the design and construction stage. Projects are prioritized for implementation based a City Council adopted $32,000 cost per benefitting property threshold. Projects with a cost less than $32,000 per property at the EA stage and preliminary design stage proceed to construction.

Projects that exceed the $32,000 cost per benefiting property threshold will not be included in the five year Project List to undergo preliminary design. They will be moved into the State of Good Repair’s long term capital plan.

The implementation of Basement Flooding Protection Program (BFPP) projects includes three key steps:

  1. Preliminary design,
  2. Detailed engineering design, and
  3. Construction

Construction: Sewer Improvement

Improved, larger storm sewer pipes.
Oversized sewer pipe
Construction of improved, larger pipe.
Oversized sewer pipe installation

A study was completed in 2014, please see the Area 1 East York Executive Summary.

A study was completed in 2014, please see the Area 2 Leaside Executive Summary.

A study was completed in 2011, please see the Area Report 2011.

A study was completed in 2014, please see the Area 4 5 Executive Summary.

A study was completed in 2014, please see the Area 6 Executive Summary.

Updated Summer 2015 to Fall 2017

In late 2012, the City of Toronto completed an Environmental Assessment (EA) study to address basement and surface flooding in the area centred around Burhamthorpe Road and Renforth Drive (referred to as Study Area 9, as seen in the map below). A recommendation of this study was to conduct testing to determine where rain and ground water are improperly entering the sanitary sewer system.

As a result, the City has hired Civica Infrastructure to perform this study. The results will be used to identify opportunities to address inflow/infiltration issues to help mitigate the risk of basement flooding.

Learn more about sources of inflow and infiltration that contribute to flooding

Background

The sewer system in Area 9 is partially separated which means that there is a storm sewer for rainwater and a sanitary sewer for wastewater and weeping tiles. The way that the sanitary sewer system in Area 9 reacts to rainfall events suggests that there may be connections between the storm sewer system and the sanitary sewer system. The study determined that the majority of basement flooding in Area 9 was due to rainwater entering the sanitary sewer system during large storm events. Civic Infrastructure will perform an investigation to determine where rainwater and groundwater is entering into the sanitary sewer system. The results will be used to identify opportunities to address inflow/infiltration issues to help mitigate the risk of future flooding.

A study was completed in 2011, please see Executive Summary:

Area 7 recommendations

Area 8 recommendations

Area 9 recommendations

Area 10 recommendations

A study was completed in 2011, please see Executive Summary:

Area 11 Recommendations

Area 12 Recommendations

A study was completed in 2009, please see the Area 14 Report.

A study was completed in 2014, please see:

Area 13 Executive Summary

Area 15 Executive Summary

A study was completed in 2012, please see Area 16 Executive Summary.

A study was completed in 2016, please see Area 21 Executive Summary.

A study was completed in 2014, please see Area 22 Executive Summary.

A study was completed in 2016, please see Area 23 Executive Summary.

A study was completed in 2016, please see Area 24 Executive Summary.

A study was completed in 2016, please see Area 25 Executive Summary.

A study was completed in 2016, please see Area 26 Executive Summary.

A study was completed in 2016, please see Area 27 Main Report.

A study was completed in 2008, please email to request the Executive Summary.

A study was completed in 2008, please email to request the Executive Summary.

A study was completed in 2008, please email to request the Executive Summary.

A study was completed in 2011, please email to request the Executive Summary.

A study was completed in 2012, please email to request the Executive Summary.

What is a Class Environmental Assessment?

Ontario’s Environmental Assessment (EA) program promotes good environmental planning by determining and managing the potential effects of a project prior to implementation.

The EA program ensures that public concerns are heard. EA balances economic, social, cultural and natural environmental needs so that projects benefit Ontario.

This study is being carried out according to the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment process. This is an approved approach to satisfying requirements of the Environmental Assessment Act specifically tailored to municipal infrastructure. The process includes identifying the problem or opportunity to be addressed, developing and evaluating a range of alternative solutions, providing opportunities for public input and identifying a preferred solution.