The City’s contractor has completed the following work on Dovercourt Road, from Sudbury Street to College Street:

  • Watermain replacement from Queen Street West to College Street (substandard water service replacement is currently being finalized from St. Anne’s Road to College Street)
  • Road reconstruction from Queen Street West to Dundas Street West
  • Road resurfacing from Sudbury Street to Queen Street West

The ongoing substandard water service replacement work will continue to have an impact on traffic / parking on Dovercourt Road. A temporary southbound ONLY traffic operation (College Street to Dundas Street West) will continue to be in place until this work is completed on August 20, 2021.

As part of the road reconstruction work, the following road safety measures were implemented between Queen Street West and Dundas Street West in an effort to enhance safety and accessibility for all road users:

  • Intersection improvements at MacKenzie Crescent, Foxley Street, Argyle Street and Humbert Street to reduce pedestrian crossing distances and slow right-turning traffic
  • Raising the curb height to make it more difficult for vehicles to mount the curb and encroach on pedestrian space
  • Speed humps to reduce speeds at which vehicles travel.

While we aim to provide fully accessible content, there is no text alternative available for some of the content on this page. If you require alternate formats or need assistance understanding our maps, drawings, or any other content, please contact Michael Vieira at 416-392-0472 or roadconstruction@toronto.ca.

Construction Notices

Dovercourt Road from Dundas Street West to Queen Street West was last reconstructed in 1990. The City inspected the pavement surface in 2017 and found it to be in poor condition, with a lot of cracking within the road surface. Because of the poor road condition, this section of Dovercourt Road requires full reconstruction of the road down to the base surface.

Road reconstruction is a major undertaking and provides an opportunity to also install road safety measures, better manage stormwater and add traffic calming. As part of the reconstruction, the underground cast iron watermain, built in the late 1800s, will also be replaced.

Traffic calming is a term commonly associated with physical features, such as speed humps, that are installed on a road to reduce the speeds at which vehicles travel, to discourage through traffic, to improve traffic safety and the comfort levels for all road users.

Traffic calming helps to achieve slower speeds for motor vehicles, and increase the safety for pedestrian and cyclists.

There are three options proposed for Dovercourt Road.

Proposed Traffic Calming Options

Based on resident interests for traffic calming measures, City staff are proposing three different traffic calming options. You have an opportunity to provide feedback on your preferred option.

Option 1 – Speed Humps (Preferred)

This option places speed humps on Dovercourt Road from Dundas Street West to Queen Street West

Note: Speed humps can also be combined with other traffic calming options.

diagram of speed humps
example of speed humps
Advantages
  • Helps to reduce vehicle speed
  • No loss of parking spaces (78 permit parking spaces retained); parking would remain on west side
  • Minimal impact on cyclists as curb edge allows for cyclists to bypass speed humps
  • Little impact on snow clearing
Disadvantages
  • Impact on Emergency Services (Ambulance, Fire, Police) by slowing down response time and impacting the comfort of patients being transported

Option 2 – Alternating On-Street Parking by block

This option involves switching the side of the street that is used for on-street parking at block intervals. For example, parking switches to the other side of the street after each block.

diagram of on-street parking alternating by block
Example of on-street parking alternating at block intervals
Advantages
  • Helps to reduce vehicle speed
  • Possible reduction in short-cutting traffic or through traffic
Disadvantages
  • Potential impact to people on bikes include restricted visibility of cyclists and dooring hazards

This option retains 72 permit parking spaces (loss of six permit parking spaces) however, there is no impact on permit holders because the permit parking on Dovercourt Road is undersubscribed.

Option 3 – Alternating On-Street Parking by mid-block

This option involves switching the side of the street that is used for on-street parking at mid-block intervals. For example, parking switches to the other side of the street at each mid-block and each block.

diagram of on-street parking alternating by mid block
Example of on-street parking alternating at mid block intervals
Advantages
  • Helps to reduce vehicle speed
  • Possible reduction in short-cutting traffic or through traffic
Disadvantages
  • Potential impact to people on bikes include restricted visibility of cyclists and dooring hazards

This option retains 69 permit parking spaces (loss of nine permit parking spaces) however, there is no impact on permit holders because the permit parking on Dovercourt Road is undersubscribed.

map showing Dovercourt Road from Dundas Street West to Sudbury Street

In 2016, a community consultation event was held to discuss the possibility of turning Dovercourt Road into a one-way street between Dundas Street West and Queen Street West. Resident feedback was mixed, with many residents opposed to the impact this would have by diverting traffic onto nearby streets.

In 2018, the speed limit was lowered from 40 km/h to 30 km/h.

A mid-block speed study was conducted in July 2019 and found an 85th percentile speed of 40km/h (the speed at which 85 per cent of vehicles travel at or below).

Residents continued to report concerns about speeding and vehicles mounting the curb (sidewalk) to allow other vehicles to pass.

Area residents expressed interest in exploring other possible traffic calming measures.

Public Consultation

On Monday, October 7, 2019, the City hosted a public drop-in event at The Great Hall. Over 45 residents participated, where they viewed information materials, spoke with the project team and provided feedback.

City staff presented three options to help calm traffic along Dovercourt Road. Feedback from residents was received at the event and through an online survey. The majority of residents who responded preferred the addition of speed humps along Dovercourt Road (refer to Traffic Calming Options tab for more information).

In January 2020, the Toronto and East York Community Council approved the installation of speed humps along Dovercourt Road from Dundas Street West to Queen Street West.  Speed humps will be installed once road reconstruction on Dovercourt Road in completed in summer 2021.