The City of Toronto licenses multi-tenant houses (rooming houses) to ensure that they are safe and well-maintained. These houses are permitted in the former City of Toronto and some parts of Etobicoke and York.

Municipal Licensing and Standards is currently undertaking a review on options to improve the licensing and regulation of multi-tenant houses, including the rooming house hearing process. Please note that the review will not look at whether multi-tenant houses should be permitted in other areas of the city. City Planning will be reviewing the existing zoning for multi-tenant houses and holding public consultations on this in the near future.

There are different opportunities for you to provide feedback on the licensing regulations currently being reviewed by Municipal Licensing and Standards. All feedback will be used to inform a report going to the Planning and Housing Committee in the fall of 2019.

Attend Public Consultation

August 22, 2019
6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Metro Hall, Room 308/309
55 John Street, Toronto, ON M5V 3C6

Email Feedback

If you have questions about the review, or if you cannot attend and would like to offer your feedback, you can also contact us at mlsfeedback@toronto.ca by August 31, 2019.

Assistive listening devices, materials in large-print and alternative formats, ASL interpreters, and other accommodations will be made available upon request. Please contact the Policy & Planning team at mlsfeedback@toronto.ca at least 72 business hours in advance of a meeting to help ensure availability.

In order to assist the City’s efforts to accommodate persons with severe allergies, environmental illness, multiple chemical sensitivity or related disabilities, attendees at public meetings are reminded that other attendees may be sensitive to various chemical based scented products.

A multi-tenant house is where a kitchen and/or washroom is shared between four or more people who pay individual rent. It is an important part of the affordable rental housing market and provides single-room accommodation to diverse tenants including students, seniors, new immigrants and low/moderate income residents. Learn more about rooming houses and how they are regulated in Toronto.

Municipal Licensing and Standards (ML&S) and City Planning began a review of multi-tenant houses in 2014. As part of the review, feedback was collected from more than 1,500 members of the public and key stakeholder groups. This feedback was used to inform a joint staff report from ML&S and City Planning, which included a proposed zoning, licensing and enforcement strategy for multi-tenant houses that was adopted by Executive Committee in October 2016. Staff were directed to consult on the strategy and report back to Committee in 2017.

Consultations took place over the summer of 2017. ML&S and City Planning hosted public consultation in areas where multi-tenant houses are permitted, as well as in five proposed pilot areas where multi-tenant houses are not permitted. Feedback was also collected through focus groups, stakeholder meetings and an online survey.

There are currently a number of housing-related studies and initiatives underway that involve various divisions across the City of Toronto, including City Planning. The work undertaken by ML&S is being integrated into the work of the other divisions.

This current review responds to Council directives to look at options to improve the licensing and regulation of multi-tenant houses, including the rooming house hearing process.

Feedback will be used to inform a report going to the Planning and Housing Committee in the fall of 2019.

Fraternities and Sororities

In May 2018, City Council removed the licensing exemption for student registered fraternity and sorority houses, so that they may be required to be licensed, as set out in Chapter 285.