The City of Toronto operates 10 long-term care homes. Learn more about the quality care and services we provide as leaders in excellence and groundbreaking services for healthy aging.

Toronto Long-Term Care Homes & Services has been Accredited with Commendation for going beyond the requirements of Accreditation Canada’s Qmentum accreditation program and demonstrating an ongoing commitment to quality improvement.

Overall, Toronto Long-Term Care Homes & Services met 97 per cent of the 614 standard criteria and met 100 per cent of the required organizational practices (ROPs), which are evidence-based practices that mitigate risk and contribute to improving the quality and safety of health services: Safety Culture, Communication, Medication Use, Worklife/Workforce, Infection Control, and Risk Assessment.

High priority criteria results were impressive, as a percentage of criteria met: Leadership 100 per cent; Long-Term Care Services 94 per cent; Home Support Services 93 per cent; Infection Prevention and Control 92 per cent; and Medication Management 100 per cent.

A survey team of eight healthcare professionals from across Canada, visited all ten Toronto long-term care homes, community programs and head office May 2 – 6, 2016 as part of the Qmentum accreditation program. Organizations that choose to participate in this pursuit of excellence must complete detailed self-assessments, provide evidence of compliance with national standards, and commit to integrated quality management, continuous improvement and intensive peer review.

Accreditation Canada is a not-for-profit, independent organization accredited by the International Society for Quality in Health Care (ISQua).

As recognized leaders in behavioural support programs, we have a long history of demonstrated knowledge of dementia, delirium and mental health in the delivery of care.

Staff and medical professionals are knowledgeable in the most prevalent types and related causes of behavioural issues, understand disease processes, stages and progression, diagnostic and assessment process, cognitive or neurological symptoms, treatment interventions, appropriate communication to address resident needs, strategies to promote optimal quality of life and experience of the behaviour(s) from the perspective of the resident, family members and other partners in care.

All City of Toronto long-term care homes have behavioural support programs. Cummer Lodge has a Ministry-designated 16-bed Behavioural Support Unit which receives enhanced funding.

In its first formal Service Plan, Long-Term Care Homes & Services (LTCHS) is providing a framework to guide budget and resource allocations over the next five years to support how the City will provide, improve and prioritize long-term care services to a diverse, aging population with complex care and social needs.

Aligned with the service principles specified in the Toronto Seniors Strategy – Equity, Respect, Inclusion and Quality of Life – the LTCHS Service Plan will:

  • Support residents in long-term care homes and clients living in their own homes for as long as possible through enhanced programs and services.
  • Meet the increasingly complex and diverse needs of those we serve.
  • Be recognized as a leader in the long-term care sector and within the City by supporting seniors.

Within the context of a rapidly changing long-term care landscape, the Service Plan captures current service levels, and notes where enhancements can be initiated and identifies opportunities where new services are needed, pending City Council approval and/or funding.

The Service Plan is part of a holistic approach to broader planning initiatives that include the divisional Strategic and Capital Renewal Plans, the City’s Strategic Actions, Toronto Seniors Strategy, other City initiatives and plans, as well as the priorities of provincial and partner organizations.

Preparation was collaborative, involving all stakeholder groups. Throughout the research, consultations, information gathering and sharing exercises, three overall themes and priorities emerged:

  1. Deliver exemplary care and services through a continuum of care;
  2. Serve vulnerable individuals and respond to emerging community needs; and
  3. Lead advances in long-term care and support services to seniors.

Within the Service Plan, further context is provided on what we do in terms of service delivery, who our residents and clients are and how we operate within the broader healthcare sector.

This Service Plan will differentiate between actions that are going to build on or enhance current service (which can be pursued within the existing LTCHS budget) – and those which we will monitor and would represent “new” activities or programs for LTCHS, which would be subject to funding and Council approval.

Deliver

Long-Term Care Homes & Services provides a variety of exemplary, high-quality services along a comprehensive and flexible continuum of care – from enabling vulnerable individuals to continue living in the community to healthy aging and quality end of life care in our homes – to help seniors at different stages of their long-term care journey. The goal is to provide Torontonians in need of long-term care with the right services, at the right time, and in the right place. There is a need for:

  • increased and strengthened community programs and supports to help seniors remain in their homes longer;
  • improved end-of-life and palliative care;
  • behavioural support/specialized units to support complex care needs and mental health issues;
  • a range of services and supports to better serve individuals in long-term care; and
  • staff to be skilled and trained in order to meet the needs of those entrusted to their care.

Deliver exemplary care and services through a continuum of care

To support residents in long-term care homes and clients living in their own homes for as long as possible through enhanced programs and services.

Pursue within the existing budget:

  • Provide a continuum of high-quality long-term care services in the City’s long-term care homes and community programs.
  • Provide a variety of bed types, e.g. convalescent care, short-stay, long-stay and specialized programs such as behaviour support
  • Provide Adult Day Programs (ADP), Homemakers and Nurses Services (HMNS) and Supportive Housing Services (SHS)
  • Pursue new funding to support identified populations such as Aboriginals, homeless seniors, Veterans and former, older inmates leaving prison.
  • Adopt the Palliative Performance Scale and Symptom Management Tool
  • Early identification of residents requiring palliative care
  • Accommodate family needs, e.g. overnight stays.
  • Through enhanced data sharing and increased opportunities for benchmarking
  • Identify and develop specific opportunities within the division and with other community partners, e.g. Toronto Community Housing Corporation and Community Agency Notification Program.
  • Continue to develop, based on research and evidence-based best practice, the division’s end-of-life strategy and palliative care program.
  • Expand and strengthen existing partnerships to generate new initiatives and service integration opportunities.

Subject to future approval by City Council:

  • Pursue funding opportunities to support delivery of care and services.
  • Pursue provincial Nurse Practitioner program.
  • Explore co-location of services (internal and external)
  • Expand assisted living for high-risk seniors in the community.
  • Enhance ADP capacity with extended hours and expanded services
  • Develop ADP for specialized needs, e.g. dual diagnosis, developmentally delayed
  • Expand HMNS to eliminate or reduce the waitlist.
  • Increase resident/client outing opportunities
  • Expand alternative therapies and services, e.g. complementary care, art and music therapies.
  • Support Service Hub development.
  • Expand care and services provided in the Adult Day Programs and Homemakers and Nurses Services Programs.
  • Support quality of care and life for residents and clients.
  • Respond to community need/demand for expansion of long stay beds and services.
  • Implement LTCHS’ Capital Renewal Plan.

Serve

Long-Term Care Homes & Services serves a diverse population, from young adults with severe disabilities to seniors with cognitive impairments, medical complexities and behavioural challenges.

Residents and clients represent an increasingly diverse range of spoken languages, cultures and ethnicities, food preferences, faiths, sexual orientations, gender identities and expression. As a municipal service provider, LTCHS fills a gap in service for hard-to serve or underserved Torontonians, who may lack family support, struggle with poverty, homelessness, substance abuse or social isolation and lack resources to access long-term care.

At the same time, there is an increase in the complexity of residents’ and clients’ physical and mental health conditions and behaviours, requiring an investment in increased training, specialized services, and new approaches to care. Further, with the growing movement to support Torontonians to age at home for as long as possible and large waitlists for long-term care homes, many individuals entering the City’s long-term care homes are older, frailer and have more complex needs than in the past. As the challenges of complex care needs, growing poverty and diversity intersect, LTCHS will continue to provide exemplary care that is responsive to the emerging needs of Toronto’s diverse and vulnerable adults.

Serve vulnerable individuals and respond to emerging community needs

To meet the increasingly complex and diverse needs of those we serve.
Pursue within the existing budget:

  • Support residents and clients with specialized health care needs.
  • Refresh the LGBT Tool Kit for creating culturally competent care for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons
  • Hire, recruit and retain staff with specialized skills
  • Enhance training for dementia, mental health, substance abuse disorders, complex behavioural and medical conditions, diversity and sensitivity, and end-of-life and palliative care.
  • Identify and serve individuals that are not well-served within long-term care, e.g. special populations such as those with challenging behaviours
  • Co-lead George Street Revitalization project
  • Increase healthy aging/healthy lifestyle education
  • Support the City’s Seniors Strategy
  • Support the City’s Poverty Reduction Strategy
  • Support the Toronto Strong Neighbourhoods Strategy (TSNS 2020).
  • Expand the Volunteer Program and develop meaningful volunteer opportunities.
  • Create a Volunteer Recruitment, Development and Retention strategy
  • Increase evening and weekend programs for more flexible scheduling
  • Introduce volunteer opportunities in community programs.
  • Plan services that support and address the needs of the socially-isolated, poor, homeless, frail, underserved and vulnerable individuals.

Subject to future approval by City Council:

  • Enhance and expand culturally relevant meals, programming, services and support.
  • Explore cultural food requests/requirements and seek provincial funding
  • Facilitate resident and client use of emerging technology.
  • Explore and develop innovative services, e.g. memory clinics.
  • Provide support for increasing acuity and complex care needs.
  • Specialized nursing resources to support clients with mental illness.
  • Develop and pilot dementia specific programs and services.
  • Pursue opportunities for additional programs, services and specialized units.
  • Expand Mental Health Program to additional Supportive Housing sites.

Lead

Long-Term Care Homes & Services strives to be recognized leaders in excellence and ground-breaking services for healthy aging, to make contributions that shape and influence public policy, and to improve the overall long-term care system and better serve the people of Toronto. LTCHS will continue to strengthen Toronto’s communities and the wider long-term care sector through a range of research, innovation and leadership initiatives.

The rising complexity of care needs and acuity of clients will require skill and competency training for staff at all levels.

Given the relative size of Toronto’s seniors population and the size and scope of Toronto as a municipal long-term care service provider, the City’s influence and leadership has the potential to have a far-reaching and positive impact on the wider long-term care sector. This could contribute to ‘improved quality of life and care’ for all seniors, enhance the appeal of long-term care as a career choice for future generations, and contribute to a thriving, age-friendly Toronto. It is important that this leadership role be highlighted as a key priority for the next five years.

Lead advances in long-term care and support services to seniors

To be recognized as a leader in the long-term care sector and within the City by supporting seniors.

Pursue within the existing budget:

  • Undertake research opportunities and actively participate in sharing and implementing innovations and best practices related to healthy aging, quality of life and long-term care and service delivery.
  • Expand and share quality practices, care and services, e.g. Quality Fair
  • Publish leading practices and share news on award winning programs, e.g. Accreditation Canada’s Leading Practices and Quality Conference
  • Develop new and/or improve on innovative approaches in care and services delivery.
  • Increase number and breadth of students and interns within the division.
  • Provide expertise and experience at decision-making tables, e.g. advancing service and capital planning, promoting funding and regulatory reforms.
  • Introduce initiatives, e.g. academic partnerships.
  • Provide the community with senior-friendly space to socialize and network
  • Provide education events and programs
  • Host events related to healthy aging and culture, e.g. Seniors’ Wellness Symposium.
  • Strengthen and broaden opportunities for internships and student placement programs.
  • Influence provincial policy, initiatives and directions to effect positive changes within long-term care.
  • Promote careers in long-term care with LTCHS being recognized as an employer of choice.
  • Promote the City’s long-term care homes as places of quality living and resources within the community.

Subject to future approval by City Council:

  • Pursue provincial designation as a Centre for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care.

In November 2015, Toronto City Council approved the Long-Term Care Homes & Services (LTCHS) Capital Renewal Plan. The plan allows LTCHS to proceed with the staged redevelopment of five long-term care homes to meet new design standards, explore affordable housing opportunities and advance the vision to be leaders in excellence and ground-breaking services for healthy aging. The Capital Renewal Plan promotes and preserves partnerships, responds to emerging community needs, serves vulnerable individuals and ensures residents will continue to receive excellent care and services, throughout redevelopment, in City-operated long-term care homes.

The Long-Term Care Homes & Services Capital Renewal Plan is an exciting opportunity to modernize and improve the design of homes while advancing our vision to be leaders in excellence and ground-breaking services for healthy aging. The plan keeps beds in service at each site for as long as possible in order to minimize disruption. Residents will continue to receive excellent care and service throughout the redevelopment program.City Council has directed LTCHS to:

  1. Proceed with the recommended staged approach to address mandatory redevelopment;
  2. Enter into discussions with the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and Local Health Integration Networks to negotiate bed allocations and movements between locations, and to schedule redevelopment projects;
  3. Enter into discussion with Humber College Lakeshore Campus regarding opportunities for a teaching long-term care centre of excellence; and
  4. Explore opportunities to add affordable housing on the sites being redeveloped.

Receiving approval of City Council is very encouraging and will allow LTCHS to move forward with planning. However, it is important to note that funding still needs to be allocated, so final Council approval of the Capital Renewal Plan is subject to budget approval.

In addition to approving the LTCHS Capital Renewal Plan, Council adopted the George Street Revitalization plan which will include a long-term care home, emergency shelter, transitional assisted living and affordable housing units to better meet the needs of homeless, vulnerable and elderly individuals.

The LTCHS Capital Renewal Plan is based on the following Guiding Principles:

  • Deliver current level of service (2,641 Ministry approved beds) to support high-quality specialized resident-focused care while seeking to maximize cost savings and efficiencies.
  • Promote and preserve partnerships, including ethnocultural, volunteer and community linkages.
  • Respond to emerging community needs and serve vulnerable individuals.
  • Minimize resident disruption related to capital renewal.
  • Advance the Toronto Seniors Strategy with a City-wide commitment to CARE (Compassion, Accountability, Respect and Excellence) by strategically locating its homes throughout the City and by providing community hub space in support of healthy aging.

The five (5) City of Toronto long-term care homes identified for mandatory redevelopment are:

What is end of life care?

End of life care is adopted when death is expected within six months. The aim is to provide comfort and quality of life by relieving the symptoms and stresses experienced at the end of life.

What is palliative care?

Palliative care is a type of specialized care which is administered when a terminal diagnosis is given for an illness or disease. The aim is not to cure, but to provide comfort and maintain the best quality of life, with a focus on providing relief by managing a resident’s pain and symptoms.

Who provides the care?

Each home has a care team made up of professionals that includes: physicians; nurses; social work counsellors; physiotherapists; dietitians; and, spiritual and religious care coordinators.

What is an end of life care plan?

An end of life care plan determines how to provide care that reflects the resident’s physical, intellectual, social, emotional, and spiritual needs and preferences. The resident’s values, strengths, and desires will also be considered. End of life care plans are unique to each resident and are created in collaboration with the resident, the substitute decision-makers/family and the care team. The resident’s level of function will be assessed by looking at: how much they walk; their activity level and evidence of disease; their ability to care for self; how much they eat and drink; and their mental alertness. Looking at these factors will help guide a discussion with the resident and their family regarding end of life care.

How are symptoms managed?

The care team will take action based on the resident’s needs in order to minimize discomfort and provide relief from symptoms. Some of the symptoms experienced at end of life include: pain; tiredness and fatigue; drowsiness; nausea; changes in appetite; shortness of breath; depression and anxiety. The earlier we identify symptoms, the better we can manage and treat them.Grief and Bereavement Support:Grief is a natural and personal reaction to the death of a loved one. It is important to provide opportunities for expressing feelings and thoughts that are common in grieving. Staff, including a social work counsellor is available to speak with you and your family when needed.

In 2008, Long-Term Care Homes & Services (LTCHS) published the LGBT Tool Kit for Creating Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Culturally Competent Care at Toronto Long-Term Care Homes & Services. At the time, this work was ground-breaking in supporting and caring for LGBT residents in long-term care.

The Tool Kit has recently been updated and the refresh focused on engagement within the organization given the experience gained since the original Tool Kit was published in 2008. In addition to building upon the successes, challenges and understanding further opportunities to deliver LGBTQ2S-inclusive care and services, the LGBT Tool Kit: Creating Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans Inclusive and Affirming Care and Services (2017) also supports self-reflection and learning for individuals wishing to learn more. While it is meant primarily for management and staff within LTCHS, the Tool Kit is also available to other organizations as a resource.

The first two sections of the updated Tool Kit, Introduction and Background and Our Journey Continues provide context and set the stage for the following sections: Achieving Social and Cultural Competency and Achieving Organizational Competency which are related to how welcoming, inclusive and affirming environments can be created and supported by individuals and organizations. The Appendices contains resources related to a number of different areas that can be used as references to help support ongoing learning and understanding.

Resources are contained throughout the Tool Kit and include:

Self-study which provide links to resources throughout the Tool Kit

Self-reflection guide users through a series of questions to support thinking and understanding

Best practices provide readers with an opportunity to learn about a promising practice, process or initiative within Long-Term Care Homes & Services as well as other organizations.

The appendices provide additional information in a variety of areas such as LGBTQ2S affirming religious and spiritual groups, LGBTQ2S activity protocols, community and educational resources.

End notes also provide links to resources referenced throughout the Tool Kit.

To request an electronic copy of the Tool Kit, please email ltc-ho@toronto.ca

Quality Improvement Plans (QIPs) are required to be developed by all long-term care homes in Ontario for annual submission to Health Quality Ontario (HQO) by April 1. QIPs are intended to be organization and community-specific while integrating system and provincial priorities.

Visit HQO to access City of Toronto long-term care home QIPs including narratives, detailed summary of achievements, and QIP targets for the upcoming year.

Thank you for your interest in research at Long-Term Care Homes & Services. We welcome opportunities to enhance our knowledge in pursuit of excellence in the services that we provide. We know that research is an integral component of knowledge building in pursuit of that excellence.

To that end, we have developed formalized processes related to the submission of research proposals these are based on our ethics statement and ethics decision-making principles. This framework guides us to ensure that any research that is approved to be conducted within our division meets the highest standards for health care research and also meets the more specific criteria established by Toronto Long-Term Care Homes & Services.

All research proposals must have prior ethical approval from an accredited university, teaching hospital or national granting agency before the proposal will be submitted to the division’s own Ethics and Research Committee for consideration. All approved research must be conducted in a way that ensures minimal disruption to residents, clients, families and staff and provides learning and potential future benefit related to the enhancement of long-term care. All approved research must comply with the requirements of the Municipal Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (MFIPPA) and the Personal Health Information Protection Act (PHIPA).

If you are interested in collaborating with us in research that would build knowledge in the pursuit of excellence in long-term care, email ltc-ho@toronto.ca subject line Research for more details about the application process.

A Guide for Planning and Providing Francophone Long-Term Care Services is for those involved in planning, advocating for, and providing Francophone health services. The guide provides an optimal model for providing long-term care in French and features the Pavillon Omer Deslauriers and Bendale Acres. Full report including resources available online in English and French

Long-Term Care Homes & Services fully respects and promotes the following rights of residents:

  1. Every resident has the right to be treated with courtesy and respect and in a way that fully recognizes the resident’s individuality and respects the resident’s dignity.
  2. Every resident has the right to be protected from abuse.
  3. Every resident has the right not to be neglected by the licensee or staff.
  4. Every resident has the right to be properly sheltered, fed, clothed, groomed and cared for in a manner consistent with his or her needs.
  5. Every resident has the right to live in a safe and clean environment.
  6. Every resident has the right to exercise the rights of a citizen.
  7. Every resident has the right to be told who is responsible for and who is providing the resident’s direct care.
  8. Every resident has the right to be afforded privacy in treatment and in caring for his or her personal needs.
  9. Every resident has the right to have his or her participation in decision making respected.
  10. Every resident has the right to keep and display personal possessions, pictures and furnishings in his or her room subject to safety requirements and the rights of other residents.
  11. Every resident has the right to:
    1. participate fully in the development, implementation, review and revision of his or her plan of care,
    2. give or refuse consent to any treatment, care or services for which his or her consent is required by law and to be informed of the consequences of giving or refusing consent,
    3. participate fully in making any decision concerning any aspect of his or her care, including any decision concerning his or her admission, discharge or transfer to or from a long-term care home or a secure unit and to obtain an independent opinion with regard to any of those matters, and
    4. have his or her personal health information within the meaning of the Personal Health Information Protection Act, 2004 kept confidential in accordance with that Act, and to have access to his or her records of personal health information, including his or her plan of care, in accordance with that Act.
  12. Every resident has the right to receive care and assistance towards independence based on a restorative care philosophy to maximize independence to the greatest extent possible.
  13. Every resident has the right not to be restrained, except in the limited circumstances provided for under this Act and subject to the requirements provided for under this Act.
  14. Every resident has the right to communicate in confidence, receive visitors of his or her choice and consult in private with any person without interference.
  15. Every resident who is dying or who is very ill has the right to have family and friends present 24 hours per day.
  16. Every resident has the right to designate a person to receive information concerning any transfer or any hospitalization of the resident and to have that person receive that information immediately.
  17. Every resident has the right to raise concerns or recommend changes in policies and services on behalf of himself or herself or others to the following persons and organizations without interference and without fear of coercion, discrimination or reprisal, whether directed at the resident or anyone else,
    1. the Residents’ Council,
    2. the Family Council,
    3. the licensee, and, if the licensee is a corporation, the directors and officers of the corporation, and, in the case of a home approved under Part VIII, a member of the committee of management for the home under section 132 or of the board of management for the home under section 125 or 129,
    4. staff members,
    5. government officials,
    6. any other person inside or outside the long-term care home.
  18. Every resident has the right to form friendships and relationships and to participate in the life of the long-term care home.
  19. Every resident has the right to have his or her lifestyle and choices respected.
  20. Every resident has the right to participate in the Residents’ Council.
  21. Every resident has the right to meet privately with his or her spouse or another person in a room that assures privacy.
  22. Every resident has the right to share a room with another resident according to their mutual wishes, if appropriate accommodation is available.
  23. Every resident has the right to pursue social, cultural, religious, spiritual and other interests, to develop his or her potential and to be given reasonable assistance by the licensee to pursue these interests and to develop his or her potential.
  24. Every resident has the right to be informed in writing of any law, rule or policy affecting services provided to the resident and of the procedures for initiating complaints.
  25. Every resident has the right to manage his/her own financial affairs unless the resident lacks the legal capacity to do so.
  26. Every resident has the right to be given access to protected outdoor areas in order to enjoy outdoor activity unless the physical setting makes this impossible.
  27. Every resident has the right to have any friend, family member, or other person of importance to the resident attend any meeting with the licensee or the staff of the home.

Long-Term Care Home Service Accountability Agreement (L-SAA)

Service Accountability Agreements outline the responsibilities of local health service providers and the Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) with each of the City’s ten long-term care homes and community programs situated across the boundaries of five LHINs:

Multi-Sector Service Accountability Agreements (M-SAA)

The M-SAA is a multi-year agreement that supports a collaborative relationship between the LHIN and the health service provider to improve the health of Ontarians through better access to high-quality health services, to co-ordinate health care in local health systems and to manage the health system at the local level effectively and efficiently. Stated as a matter of record for public viewing, the following is a copy of the M-SAA between City of Toronto Long-Term Care Homes & Services:

The City’s long-term care homes provide spiritual and religious care as part of its inter-disciplinary approach to resident care and service.

The Long-Term Care Homes Act, 2007 section 14 states: Every licensee of a long-term care home shall ensure that there is an organized program for the home to ensure that residents are given reasonable opportunity to practice their religious and spiritual beliefs, and to observe the requirements of those beliefs.

Within each of our homes there is a contracted Coordinator of Spiritual and Religious Care available to support residents and families in meeting their spiritual and religious care needs. The Coordinators work with multi-faith community leaders to ensure that residents’ traditions and beliefs are respected. Homes have regularly scheduled worship services for residents and it is possible to make additional arrangements for spiritual and religious care for another community faith leader or a lay visitor.

Zero Tolerance for Abuse applies to any person who has contact with a resident or client, including staff, agents, volunteers, family members, substitute decision makers (SDMs), visitors, paid trainees and paid companions. Long-Term Care Homes & Services adheres to and enforces zero tolerance of abuse by any person.

Toronto Long-Term Care Homes and Services strictly adheres to and enforces zero tolerance of abuse of residents and clients by any person.The policy Zero Tolerance for Abuse applies to any person who has contact with a resident or client, including staff, agents, volunteers, family members, substitute decision makers (SDMs), visitors, paid trainees and paid companions.The definition of zero tolerance for abuse is defined by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care as:

“Zero tolerance” means within this policy, that the Long-Term Care Home Operator shall:

  • Uphold the right of the residents of Long-Term Care Homes to be treated with dignity and respect within those homes, and to live free from abuse and neglect.
  • Neither abuse, nor allow the abuse of any resident in the Operator’s Long-Term Care Home by Staff or volunteers, nor condone the abuse of any resident by any other person(s) at the home.
  • Provide information and education regarding abuse and the prevention of abuse.
  • Treat every allegation of abuse as a serious matter.
  • Investigate every allegation of abuse.
  • Take corrective action, including sanctions or penalties against those who have committed abuse against a resident.
  • Report to the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care every suspected or confirmed incident of abuse.
  • Make every effort to eliminate abuse through the quality and risk management programs.

For the purpose of this policy, staff includes any permanent, part-time and contracted:

  • Employees
  • Physicians
  • Agency staff
  • Contracted health-care professionals
  • Paid trainees
  • Students under clinical placements
  • Paid companions (paid by the resident, family member or substitute decision-maker).

This definition does not imply or create an employer/employee relationship where none exists, and it is used solely in the context of this policy to clarify that abuse will not be tolerated from any source.

Abuse can take many forms. The Long-Term Care Homes and Services Division will not condone any resident abuse. The Standards of Employee Conduct, Standard Respect for Others, 6.1 Resident Abuse, clearly defines staff expectations regarding resident abuse.

Abuse is defined as:

“Abuse” of a resident means any action or inaction, misuse of power and/or betrayal of trust or respect by any person against a resident, that the person knew or ought to have known, would cause (or could reasonably be expected to cause) harm to the resident’s health, safety or well-being.

Abuse includes, but is not limited to:

  • Physical Abuse
  • Sexual Abuse and Sexual Assault
  • Emotional Abuse
  • Verbal Abuse
  • Financial Abuse
  • Exploitation or a Resident’s Property or Person
  • Neglect
  • Prohibited Use of Restraints
  • Measures Used to Discipline a Resident

Residents have the right to dignity, respect and freedom from abuse and neglect. Toronto Long-Term Care Homes and Services has a zero tolerance for abuse; therefore, abuse will not be tolerated by any person entering the Home and corrective action will be taken in all instances of resident abuse.