• Artist: Tribal Crackling Wind
  • Medium: Performance
  • Project Type: Independent Projects
  • Neighbourhood: Bloor / Yorkville

A soul-driven ritual-dance conflict-resolution device. Dancers channel energy and thoughts to generate a healing wave that goes out, invisibly, into the world.

Location

Royal Ontario Museum, sidewalk in front of old entrance

  • Address: 100 Queen's Park
  • Public Washrooms: Yes
  • Physical Access: Wheelchair accessible
  • Indoors/Outdoors: Outdoors

The Project

“Trillionth I” will assemble dancers and musicians bringing cultural currents originating from China, Indonesia, Cambodia, Latin America, Canada, Europe, Africa and the Caribbean. This global outlook will converge on a Southeast Asian sensibility. Together, through ritual dance and performance, these dancers and musicians will enact the confrontation, understanding and processing of conflict and negative energy. With movement and sound, they will hope to transform these elements into something that is healing, life-nurturing and illuminating of the inner life. This group effort hopes to contribute to evolutionary pathways of humanity through empathy, telepathy, embodied goodness, love and the embrace of the sacred. In other words, it’s a tall order, haunted by lurking darkness and engaged with the ultimate themes of humanity. Despite best efforts, the free shuttle bus between Royal Ontario Museum, Ontario Science Centre, Aga Khan Museum and Coxwell Station is no longer operating. All-night TTC services are available on Line 1, 2 and 3, helping audience explore the event.

The Artist

Tribal Crackling Wind brings together the artists and the means to produce works by multidisciplinary artist Peter Chin. As choreographer, composer, designer and performer, Chin creates works that integrate all these genres to create contemporary rituals. In these events, performers and creators are directly involved in the meaning of the work, merging art and life.

Acknowledgements

  • This project was supported through Toronto Arts Council Strategic Funding.

Tribal Crackling Wind is generously supported by the Canada Council for the Arts, the Ontario Arts Council, the Toronto Arts Council, Lindy Green and Sam Chaiton, Heritage Hub Cambodia Living Arts, Amrita Performing Arts and ISBI Bandung Indonesia.