Last updated: September 27, 2022 at 3:10 p.m.

This content is currently being updated to reflect the most recent guidance from the Ministry of Health.

Read information on what to do if you are a close contact and understanding COVID-19 symptoms in children/students. If your child is self-isolating, see Toronto Public Health’s guidance for caring for a child who is self-isolating or has COVID-19 and see Toronto Public Health’s COVID-19 Testing guidance.

Screening Poster for Child Care, Day Camps and Schools

Download the Screening Poster for Child Care, Day Camps and Schools. Size 8.5 x 11 inches.

Screening Questionnaire for Child Care, Day Camps and Schools

Download the Screening Questionnaire for Child Care, Day Camps and Schools. Size 8.5 x 11 inches.

 

What is a Close Contact?

A close contact is defined as having contact with someone within 48 hours of them developing COVID-19 symptoms or testing positive for COVID-19; AND your child:

  • Was within two metres AND
  • Spent at least 15 minutes of time with them AND/OR multiple shorter lengths of time.

The Province of Ontario has stated that attending school/child care with someone who is symptomatic/positive for COVID-19 may not always be considered close contact. All cases in the school/child care settings are encouraged to notify their close contacts directly if they have significant one-on-one interactions, without wearing a well-fitted, high-quality mask. The contacts will be required to monitor their symptoms and wear a well-fitted mask in all public settings (including schools and child care unless under 2 years of age) for 10 days since their last interaction with the person who is symptomatic/tested positive for COVID-19.

Learn more about what is a close contact in the community ( also available in French).

If your child has (new or worsening) symptoms of COVID-19 (1 OR more of the following: fever/chills, cough, difficulty breathing, decrease or loss of taste or smell; AND/OR 2 or more of the following: sore throat, runny nose/nasal congestion, headache, feeling very tired, muscle aches/joint pain, nausea/ vomiting/diarrhea) they should stay at home and self-isolate.

The Province has announced that, effective March 21, 2022, masks will no longer be required for staff, students, children or any other individuals in school/child care settings.  Even in the absence of regulations requiring their use, masking continues to be an important part of our community’s response to the pandemic. Wearing a well-fitting, high quality mask is an important measure that can be used to protect ourselves and one another.

Helping Your Child Wear a Mask at School/Child Care

  • Choose a high quality mask, e.g. 3+ layers of cloth, medical mask, or respirator.
  • Make sure the mask fits comfortably and covers their nose, mouth and chin.
  • Remind them to wear a mask indoors, and outdoors when it is hard to keep a distance.
  • Plan to send at least two high-quality masks with your child each day.
  • Send a bag for clean and dirty masks. Masks should be changed when dirty or wet.
  • Remind students not to share their masks with others.

Download this information as a PDF (available in French).

How to Wear a Mask at School/Child Care

  • Choose a high quality mask, e.g. 3+ layers of cloth, medical mask, or respirator.
  • Clean your hands with soap and water or hand sanitizer.
  • Make sure the mask fits over your nose, mouth and chin and is comfortable.
  • Remove your mask as soon as it gets wet or dirty. Avoid touching the outside of the mask.
  • Place the dirty cloth mask in a bag and clean your hands again. Put on a new, clean mask.
  • Do not leave the mask on your neck or forehead. Cover your nose. Do not share masks.

Download this information as a PDF (available in French).

Learn more about face masks and respirators, including qualities of a good mask.

Learn more about the school immunization program.

Read Toronto Public Health’s letters to parents/guardians in publicly funded schools:

Read Toronto Public Health’s information on Oral Health including tips on practicing good oral hygiene.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccines. Visit Toronto Public Health’s COVID-19: Vaccines for Infants, Children & Youth and refer to the COVID-19 Vaccine Resource List for Youth. (also available in French).

Learn more about the requirements for travellers entering Canada.