Last updated: May 28, 2020 at 5:05 p.m.

Certain businesses and workplaces may reopen as long as they comply with strict public health measures and operate safely during the COVID-19 outbreak. Read Toronto Public Health’s Planning Guide for Reopening Toronto Businesses and Workplaces during the COVID-19 Pandemic for information on reopening businesses safely.

The Government of Ontario declared a provincial emergency on March 17, 2020 under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. This declaration of emergency was last extended on May 12, 2020 and is currently in effect until June 2, 2020. On May 27, the Government of Ontario extended all emergency orders put in place under this declaration to date until June 9, 2020. The Province has also issued temporary emergency orders to support the immediate needs of hospitals and health care workers so manage critical health care human resources during COVID-19.

Ontario businesses who have questions about the emergency orders can call the Province’s toll-free line: 1-888-444-3659.

Learn about economic support and recovery for businesses.

Read Toronto Public Health’s Guidance for Workplaces/Businesses and Employers (also available below) and Four Step Public Health Planning Guide for Reopening Toronto Businesses and Workplaces during the COVID-19 Pandemic.

The Planning Guide for Businesses identifies issues and critical elements of emergency preparedness that organizations should consider in planning for a pandemic.

Read also Public Health Ontario’s guidance on Cleaning and Disinfection for Public Settings.

Learn about supports available for businesses.

Resources


COVID-19 Guidance for Employers, Workplaces and Businesses

This document will provide guidance to protect your employees and customers from COVID-19 in a non-health care workplace or place of business. Strategies can be adapted to meet the needs of different environments.

Novel Coronavirus and COVID-19

COVID-19 stands for Corona Virus Disease – 2019 (year the outbreak began). COVID-19 spreads through the direct contact with the respiratory droplets of someone who is infected with the virus through their cough or sneeze. These droplets can spread up to two metres/six feet. It may be possible for a person to get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes.

Protective Measures to Keep Everyone Safe

  • Keep two metres/six feet distance from others.
  • Clean your hands often, using soap and water or an alcohol-based (70%) hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid touching your face with unwashed hands.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze into your elbow or a tissue. Immediately throw the tissue in the garbage and wash your hands.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
  • A face mask or covering is strongly recommended if you are unable to maintain a two metres/six feet distance from others, such as on transit, in an elevator, when entering and leaving your apartment building.
  • Avoid non-essential trips in the community.

Screen Staff for COVID-19 Symptoms before Work

It is strongly recommend that all staff complete a health screening questionnaire before each work shift. The questions can be completed on a paper based questionnaire; can be asked directly to employees and answers recorded; or can be completed electronically. See sample screening form that can be used.

Policy for Employee Attendance

Employers should ensure staff do not come to work sick. Have a clear procedure to notify a supervisor if a staff is sick. Consider the following:

  • Teleworking options if available.
  • Stagger shifts or offer flexible work hours and schedules.
  • If employees become sick with COVID-19 symptoms while at work, they should go home right away and self-isolate. Employee can call Telehealth, their health care provider or an Assessment Centre to see if they need testing.
  • It is generally not recommended that employees be tested for COVID-19 if they do not have symptoms.
  • Establish criteria for returning to work. In general, employees are able to return to work 14 days after their symptoms start if they had COVID-19. There are no tests of clearance that are required to return to work.
  • Maintain flexible policies so employees can stay home to care for a sick family member, or if they must self-isolate because they were in close contact with a person with COVID-19.
  • Be flexible about needing a doctor’s note.

Clean Hands Often

Handwashing or using an alcohol-based (70%) hand sanitizer is very important to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Washing with soap and water is preferred if hands are visibly dirty. Clean hands thoroughly, lather and rub for at least 15 seconds. Ensure adequate supplies are maintained. If gloves are being used, after removing gloves, place in garbage and wash hands.

Practise Physical Distancing

Employees should keep two metres/six feet from other staff and customers as much as possible. Discourage employees from congregating. Ensure staff maintain physical distancing while in lunch room and meeting rooms.

Cloth and Non-Medical Masks

Non-medical / cloth masks are strongly recommended for employees when physical distancing cannot be maintained. Train staff on the proper use of masks and how to safely put on and take off a mask.

Engineering Controls

Consider installing Plexiglas or other barriers if there will be close contact between your staff and customers. Remove surplus furniture and supplies from walkways to allow ease of movement while maintaining physical distancing. Use tap features at checkout instead of cash.

Cleaning and Disinfectants

Ensure frequent cleaning and disinfecting of high-touch surfaces and common areas such door handles, counters, cabinet doors, elevator buttons, light switches, faucets, toilet handles, hand rails, touch screen surfaces and keypads. Common areas should have soap, hand sanitizer and/or disinfectant wipes. If wipes are not available, general disinfectants can be used.

Commonly used cleaners and disinfectants are effective against COVID-19. Use only disinfectants that have a Drug Identification Number (DIN) that confirms it is approved for use in Canada. Follow manufacturer’s instructions and check the expiry date of products.

Establish Policies

Make plans to operate with different levels of staff absenteeism due to illness, ill-dependants, or for child care during school closures. Businesses and other employers should prepare to institute flexible workplace and leave policies. Review and decide what services are essential during this pandemic. Plan business functions, jobs, roles and critical elements within your business that have been identified to be essential or critical.

Establish a communication process to update employees and business partners on changes to your business during COVID-19. Provide communications with anticipation there may be employee fear, anxiety, rumors, and misinformation.

Travel

At this time, the Government of Canada recommends all Canadians avoid all non-essential travel. Check the Government of Canada’s travel advisories for the latest guidance and recommendations. Travellers entering Canada will be required to self-isolate for 14 days after return from travel outside of Canada. Healthy individuals that cross the border and are deemed essential workers are exempt from self-isolation but must self-monitor for symptoms.

If there is a Case of COVID-19 in the Workplace

Person(s) with confirmed or suspected cases of COVID-19 are reported by health care providers and laboratories to public health. If someone at the workplace got COVID-19, public health will conduct an investigation and assess risks to staff that may have occurred in the workplace. Public Health will advise staff/workplace of any additional measures needed to reduce the risk of transmission. This may include instructions for staff to self-isolate or self-monitor for COVID-19 symptoms, and/or increase cleaning and disinfecting. Employees who do not have symptoms are not tested; however, Public Health will advise if additional testing is necessary if there are multiple cases at a workplace (outbreak). Tests for clearance to return to work are not necessary.

Unless advised by Toronto Public Health through the above assessment, there are no restrictions or special measures required for contacts of suspected cases of COVID-19 in the setting.

Keeping Customers Safe

Reduce overcrowding. Increase your online or phone services. Plan for curb side delivery. Hand sanitizer if available for customers should be at entry and exit.

Cloth Masks & Face Coverings for Customers

Cloth masks and face covers are also strongly recommended to customers when physical distancing is difficult to maintain. Not all customers will be able to tolerate a mask and should not be denied service. Alternative ways to provide service to these individuals should be considered (online ordering/delivery).

COVID-19 Signs to Screen Customers

To protect everyone, we strongly recommend placing posters at the entrance to ensure customers do not enter if they have COVID-19 symptoms. If you provide one-on-one service, consider screening customers prior to arrival over the phone. People with symptoms of COVID-19 should go home right away so they do not spread the virus to staff and other customers.

Manage Entrance, Flow & Capacity to Maintain Physical Distancing Throughout

  • Find ways to limit entrances to allow ease of movement, and keep two metres/six feet distance from others.
  • Limited the number of customers to allow for ease of movement while staying six feet apart.
  • Post physical distancing signs at all entrances and by cashier or service counters.
  • Maintain line management – use public announcement systems or have staff remind everyone to stay 6 feet apart, for everyone’s safety.
  • Place tape or circles on the floor so the customers know where to stand as they wait in line or when interacting with staff.
  • Remove non-essential items from the counter to reduce disinfecting items.
  • Wipe down high touch surfaces frequently with a disinfectant.
  • For mail, product or curb-side delivery, follow contact less delivery.

Download and Print Posters for your Workplace

Other Resources


 

Holidays, celebrations, and faith-based observances are normally an opportunity to spend time with family, friends, and the wider community and may include hosting a big meal, visiting extended family, or attending an important faith service.

Everyone is urged to follow provincial orders to close places of worship and restrict gatherings, and follow public health recommendations for physical distancing, to remain at home, leaving only for essential reasons.

Spiritual, emotional, and mental well-being is important during these difficult times. Connect with loved ones, friends, and vulnerable members of the community online or by phone. Those feeling isolated or anxious are encouraged to seek mental health support.

Many places of worship are hosting services online and implementing innovative ways to connect their communities while staying physically apart. Check the website of a place of worship for information on online services and supports.

Grocery Shopping for Occasions

Those planning to mark an occasion with a special meal for members of their household should be mindful of the current situation in the wider community.

General advice for grocery shopping remains:

  • Grocery shop only one day per week and buy only what you need for up to two weeks
  • Respect store hours dedicated to seniors, vulnerable persons, and essential service workers (normally the first hour stores are open)
  • Have a list of items, shop efficiently, and do not casually browse
  • Do not touch food or products you are not intending to buy
  • Practice physical distancing
  • When possible, pay with a card or phone tap rather than cash

Food Donations

There are also many opportunities to foster the spirit holidays and special occasions through donations to local food banks. Residents who are able are encouraged to donate non-perishable food to food banks or drop off food donations at local fire halls.

Non-essential Travel

The Government of Canada has prohibited foreign nationals, including U.S. nationals, from entering Canada for non-essential travel, which includes holidays and celebrations. Anyone that does enter the country, including Canadians returning from travel, is required, by law, to self-isolate for 14 days regardless of whether they have symptoms of COVID-19.

On March 17, 2020, the provincial government issued an order that all licensed child care centres must cease to operate in Ontario, with the exception of emergency child care to support essential and critical workers.

Emergency Child Care

The City of Toronto has the authority and discretion to determine emergency child care needs. At this time, emergency child care centres are located in existing City-run child care facilities, and are operated and staffed by City of Toronto child care workers.

Community-operated child care centres cannot operate in Toronto as emergency child care. If required, the City will work closely with our provincial and community partners to determine how this service may be expanded to include other licensed child care centres that can meet Toronto Public Health and Occupational Health and Safety requirements.

Toronto’s Emergency Child Care for Essential Workers adheres to the following guidelines, policies and procedures:

Toronto’s licensed child care system has more than 1,000 centres and 18 home child care agencies, including City-operated child care centres (Toronto Early Learning & Child Care Services) and community-operated child care programs. Learn about affected City-operated Children’s Services.

Toronto Public Health’s Guidance for Commercial or Residential Buildings provides recommendations to help reduce the risk of exposures to acute respiratory illness, including COVID-19, in buildings such as hotels, condominiums, apartment buildings and other similar vertical living spaces.

Toronto Public Health has created visuals to educate residents and building staff about what physical distancing is, exercising physical distancing on elevators and in shared laundry rooms (also available in Simplified Chinese).

Read also Toronto Public Health’s Guidance for Cooling Rooms in multi-unit residential buildings during the COVID-19 pandemic, and tips for staying healthy in hot weather.

Landlords Entering a Rental Unit

Landlords are encouraged to request entry only in urgent situations (e.g. emergency repairs). When entry is still required, exercise physical distancing guidelines at all times and ensure proper hand hygiene before and after services.

Learn more about the provincial recommendations regarding entering a rental unit under current circumstances.

Closing of Communal or Shared Outdoor Recreational Amenities

The Province of Ontario has issued an order to close all outdoor recreational amenities even on private properties. This includes condo parks and gardens, benches, picnic areas, outdoor community gardens, outdoor exercise equipment, and other outdoor recreational amenities landlords provide to their residents.

Toronto Public Health has developed directions for community and allotment gardens on City property to help reduce the risk of COVID-19 for individuals using these gardens. Anyone using a community or allotment garden must do so in accordance with these directions. Garden managers and gardeners must also complete this declaration, which confirms their commitment to following these Toronto Public Health directions.

Every person visiting a garden must complete the self-assessment for COVID-19 on the Ontario Ministry of Health website (also available as a PDF). If they do not pass the assessment they should not participate in community gardening until they pass the assessment and do not have symptoms of COVID-19.

Toronto Public Health has developed a sample members list for garden managers.

Learn more about City of Toronto community and allotment gardens.

Community and allotment gardens on private property are also strongly encouraged to follow these directions to help reduce the risk of COVID-19 for individuals using their gardens.

COVID-19 Guidance for Community & Allotment Gardens

On April 25, 2020, the provincial government amended its Emergency Order to allow community and allotment gardens to operate. Community gardens exist on both City of Toronto and private property. Allotment gardens are permitted through the City of Toronto and are located on City property. In this document, garden member refers to gardeners at community gardens and allotment gardens.

As of April 30, 2020, there continues to be community spread of COVID-19. Toronto Public Health (TPH) has a role to protect the health of all residents, and public health measures are in place to reduce the spread of COVID-19. This document provides interim directions for community and allotment gardens to help reduce the risk of COVID-19 for individuals using these gardens. Any person that uses community or allotment gardens must do so in accordance with these directions. While it is recognized that these instructions will take effort on the part of garden members and managers, given the current spread of infection there is risk that needs to be managed by individuals participating in community and allotment gardens. It is important that garden members and managers commit to following these directions for their own health and to prevent the spread of COVID-19 to the general public.

The risk of severe illness from COVID-19 is greater in older adults, individuals with a weak immune system, and individuals with a pre-existing medical condition. Toronto Public Health strongly encourages residents who are at higher risk of contracting and becoming seriously ill from COVID-19 infection, such as those over the age of 70, to self-isolate, limit interaction with others, and to stay home as much as possible. If you are an older adult (aged 70+), an individual with a weak immune system, or an individual with a medical condition it is recommended that you not participate in community gardens.

Infection prevention and control measures to help reduce the risk of COVID-19 are as follows:

Reduce the risk of transmission

  • Stay at home when you are ill.
  • Practice physical distancing, and maintain a two metre (six feet) distance from others when at the garden.
  • Respect the provincial Emergency Order that prohibits social gatherings of more than five people when at the garden.

Hand hygiene and respiratory etiquette

  • Prior to entering or exiting the gardens, every person must wash hands with soap and warm water for at least 15 seconds. If warm water is not available, wash your hands with cold water and soap and then apply hand sanitizer.
  • If hands are visibly soiled, handwashing with soap and water is preferred.
  • If soap and water are not available, hands must be wiped clean before applying an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze into a tissue. Immediately throw the tissue in the garbage and wash your hands.
  • If you don’t have a tissue, sneeze or cough into your sleeve or arm.
  • Avoid touching your face, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.

Declaration from garden manager and garden members

  • Each garden manager and garden member must sign the Toronto Public Health Community and Allotment Garden Declaration, which states that garden managers and members must adhere to the interim directions.
  • Signed and dated declarations for all members of community gardens must be kept by community garden managers and must be made available to TPH upon request in order to investigate a positive case of COVID-19, should one be detected.
  • Signed and dated declarations are required before a garden member can participate in an allotment garden in order to prevent the spread of infection.

Self-screening

  • Every person visiting a garden must complete the self-assessment for COVID-19 on the Ontario Ministry of Health website. If they do not pass the assessment they should not participate in community gardening until they pass the assessment and do not have symptoms of COVID-19. Gardeners can visit the City’s website to determine if further care is required and to learn about assessment centres.
  • All garden members and managers should be aware of symptoms of COVID-19, including:
    • fever
    • cough
    • difficulty breathing
    • muscle aches and tiredness
    • sore throat
    • headache
    • runny nose
    • new loss of taste or smell

Entrance Restrictions

  • Anyone who is exhibiting symptoms of COVID-19 or has had close contact with a confirmed case of COVID-19 cannot enter a community or allotment garden.
  • No visitors are permitted to community or allotment gardens.
  • Access to the garden is only permitted to plant, maintain and harvest food. No events, training, or other programming is allowed.

Cleaning and Disinfecting Requirements

  • Thoroughly clean and disinfect high traffic areas, and frequently touched surfaces and objects (e.g. entrances/exits, tool sheds, water spigots and hoses, waste containers, and common areas).
  • High touch surfaces and items in common areas must be cleaned and disinfected after each use.
  • In general, regular household cleaners such as bleach, or alcohol-based solutions are acceptable.
  • Review Public Health Ontario’s Cleaning and Disinfection for Public Settings document.

Equipment and Tools Requirements

  • Avoid sharing tools and equipment, if possible.
  • If you must share tools and equipment, disinfect after each use.
  • Do not share gardening gloves.
  • Gardening gloves should be laundered after each use.
  • Gardening gloves are recommended as a way to maintain good hand hygiene while gardening.

Required Signage

Communications

  • Community garden managers must:
    • provide information to garden members to ensure they are familiar with symptoms of COVID-19
    • create a schedule to minimize crowding at the garden and to understand who was at the garden when to assist with contact tracing, if someone develops COVID-19
    • maintain an up-to-date list of members, including contact information
    • communicate with members frequently about these guidelines.

Gardeners who become ill while at the garden

  • People who become ill with COVID-19 symptoms while at the garden should go home immediately, in a private vehicle if possible, and self-isolate. They should also review the City of Toronto website for more information about COVID-19.
  • If a garden member or manager tests positive for COVID-19, TPH will follow-up with close contacts who may include other garden members. Other garden members who came in close contact with the infected member may also be required to self-isolate.

Download this information as a PDF.

The Planning Guide for Correctional Facilities identifies issues and critical elements of emergency preparedness that organizations should consider in planning for a pandemic.

Elementary and Secondary Schools

On May 19, the Government of Ontario announced that all public schools will remain closed for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year. Private schools will remain closed until June 9, 2020 under the extended Declaration of Emergency.

The Planning Guide for Schools identifies issues and critical elements of emergency preparedness that organizations should consider in planning for a pandemic.

Colleges and Universities

The Planning Guide for Colleges and Universities identifies issues and critical elements of emergency preparedness that organizations should consider in planning for a pandemic.

The Government of Ontario has approved an exemption to the emergency order related to gatherings to allow residents to attend drive-in religious gatherings under certain conditions to prevent the spread of COVID-19, including:

  • Vehicles must be two metres or more apart.
  • Only members of the same household can be in one vehicle.
  • People will not be able to leave their vehicles.
  • No more than five people can conduct the service from one time from outside a vehicle, and they must stay at least two metres apart from each other.

Read a letter from Toronto Public Health for further guidance on recommendations for funerals and burials.

Food Banks

Read Toronto Public Health’s Guidance for Food Banks and Donation Centres.

Food Stores

Read Toronto Public Health’s Guidance for Food Stores, including grocery stores, supermarkets and pharmacies.

Further guidance for food premises is available on the Ontario Ministry of Health’s website.

Read Toronto Public Health’s Guidance for Funeral Homes and Guidance for Visiting Cemeteries.

See also the Ontario Ministry of Health’s guidance for funeral and bereavement services.

Read Toronto Public Health’s Guidance for Group Homes and Congregate Settings.

The presence of COVID-19 in Toronto has introduced new challenges for people who use drugs, and programs providing harm reduction services. Toronto Public Health has developed resources to support people who use drugs and harm reduction workers:

Read also the Ontario Ministry of Health’s COVID-19 Guidance for Consumption and Treatment Services (CTS).

In addition to the enhanced Infection, Prevention & Control (IPAC) and cleaning measures in City-owned facilities, Toronto Public Health (TPH), Shelter, Support & Housing Administration (SSHA) have provided sector partners that operate shelters, respites, and drop-ins with interim guidelines to respond to COVID-19. See also the infection prevention and control tips for homelessness service setting providers and learn how Toronto Public Health works with shelters to help control and prevent the spread of COVID-19.

The Planning Guide for Housing Service Providers and Shelters identifies issues and critical elements of emergency preparedness that organizations should consider in planning for a pandemic.

Learn about current shelter operations, as well as sanitation and washroom services that have showers, washrooms, and drinking water, for individuals experiencing homelessness.

Resources for Shelters & Homeless Service Providers

Physical distancing posters

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) in Shelter Settings

Long-term care homes in Ontario are part of the provincial health care system, and are licensed, regulated and inspected by the Ministry of Long-Term Care. The majority of long-term care homes in Toronto are operated privately, some are non-profit, and 10 are City-run, not-for-profit facilities.

During any infectious disease outbreak in a long-term care home it is important to institute measures to prevent and control the spread of the infection in the facility, while balancing the daily life of the residents in the home. Usually, when an outbreak is declared in a particular unit or floor, infection prevention and control  measures are implemented in that area to prevent the spread to other areas of the building.

When a long-term care home has one reported a positive case of COVID-19, an outbreak is declared and a Toronto Public Health investigator is assigned to work with the facility to ensure outbreak control measures are put in place, in accordance with provincial guidelines.

Learn more about the role of Toronto Public Health in long-term care homes during the COVID-19 outbreak and how we work with long-term care homes to help control and prevent the spread of COVID-19 in these settings.

Access data about active COVID-19 outbreaks in Toronto long-term care homes on the COVID-19: Status of Cases in Toronto page.

Visiting Parks

Residents are encouraged to go outside for fresh air and exercise. However, you still need to practise physical distancing, including in parks.

Tips for keeping everyone safe when visiting a park:

  • Stay home if you are sick, even with mild symptoms.
  • Keep a distance of two metres/six feet from people outside your household at all times.
  • Use a cloth mask or face covering, in situations where it is hard to maintain physical distancing.
  • Avoid crowded places, and try to visit when the park is less busy.
  • Do not gather with people outside your household.
  • Do not arrange playdates for your children.
  • Step aside or pass others quickly and courteously on walking paths and trails.
  • Frequently wash your hands with soap and water or hand sanitizer (70-90% alcohol concentration), including before going out, after touching public surfaces, and when you return home. Do not touch your face with unwashed hands.
  • Bring your own sports equipment and toys for your children to play with.
  • Clean toys with soap and water thoroughly when you return home.

Dog Off-leash Areas

Outdoor play for dogs and their owners is encouraged to stay active and healthy. Keep everyone safe, including your dog, by keeping your dog on a leash when outdoors, and by following these tips when visiting a dog off-leash area:

  • Stay home if you or your dog are sick, even with mild symptoms.
  • Keep a distance of two metres/six feet from other owners and dogs.
  • Avoid the area if it is crowded, and come back another time.
  • Wear a cloth mask or face covering if it is difficult to maintain physical distance.
  • Frequently wash your hands with soap and water or hand sanitizer (70-90% alcohol concentration), including before going out, after touching public surfaces (e.g. gates), and when you return home. Do not touch your face with unwashed hands.
  • Clean any dog toys thoroughly with soap and water when you return home.

For more information, read the Use of Dog Off-Leash Guidelines.

Golf Courses

Follow these safety tips for golfing to protect yourself and others from COVID-19:

  • Stay home if you are sick, even with mild symptoms.
  • Reserve your tee time. Walk-ons are not permitted at this time.
  • Arrive no more than 20 minutes before tee time, and leave after your round.
  • Keep two metres/six feet distance from others at all times.
  • Frequently wash your hands with soap and water or hand sanitizer (70-90% alcohol concentration), including before going out, after touching public surfaces, and when you return home. Do not touch your face with unwashed hands.
  • Do not share clubs, balls or pull carts with other players.
  • Do not touch flagsticks. Play concludes when the ball hits the cup.
  • Wipe down and clean your equipment when you return home.

For more information, read Toronto Public Health’s Guidance for Golf Courses.

Tennis Courts

Keeping everyone safe when using tennis courses:

  • Stay home if you are sick.
  • Book court time in advance, when possible.
  • Bring your own equipment, towel, hat, water bottle and sun screen.
  • Mark your tennis balls and handle only the ones that belong to you.
  • Do not share equipment with others.
  • Play with persons in the same household or singles play only.
  • Stay on your side of the court. Cross at opposite sides of the net when changing sides.
  • Keep a two metre/six feet distance from others outside of your household.
  • Frequently wash your hands with soap and water or hand sanitizer (70-90% alcohol concentration), including before going out, after touching public surfaces (e.g. gates), and when you return home. Do not touch your face with unwashed hands.
  • Leave the court and the facility after your game.
  • Wipe down and clean your equipment when you return home.

For more information, read the Use of Community Club Tennis Courts Guidelines and the Use of Public Tennis Courts Guidelines.

Follow these tips for keeping everyone safe when using public transit:

  • Stay home and do not use public transit if you are sick, even with mild symptoms, or are self-isolating.
  • Avoid travelling during peak hours, if possible.
  • Keep a distance of two metres/six feet from people outside your household.
  • Wear a cloth mask or face covering in situations where it is hard to maintain physical distancing.
  • Frequently wash your hands with soap and water or hand sanitizer (70-90% alcohol concentration), including before going out, after touching any surfaces, and when you reach your destination.
  • Do not touch your face, nose or eyes with unwashed hands.
  • Dispose of any garbage or recycling in designated bins.

Download the Using Public Transit during COVID-19 infographic.

Read Toronto Public Health’s interim Guidance for Taxi and Ride Share Vehicles.