Infographic showing the amount of Green House Gas emissions by building type for 2019. Residential: 55%; Commercial & Institutional: 33%; Industrial: 12%

Buildings are the largest source of GHG emissions in Toronto today, accounting for 57 per cent of total emissions. The emissions stem from the burning of fossil fuels, primarily natural gas, for heating, cooling and hot water. To reach net zero emissions by 2040, we must eliminate the use of fossil fuels as much as possible and switch to cleaner energy sources such as electricity and renewable energy.

What is a Net Zero Building?

In addition to using electricity and renewable energy as energy sources for heating, cooling and hot water, buildings must also be insulated properly from attic to basement, and have energy efficiency windows and doors.

Strategies

Three key City strategies are in place to advance the decarbonization of all homes and buildings in Toronto. Together, they will work to reduce emissions from buildings to net zero by 2040:

Grants, Incentives, Financing & Support

The City delivers a variety of programs that provide funding, expertise and support to help Toronto building owners improve energy efficiency and accelerate emissions reductions from their residential, commercial, industrial and institutional buildings.

Find out more in the links below or contact the Better Buildings Program Navigation & Support Services team.

Support for Homeowners

Incentives from the City and utility companies to make your home more energy efficient.

Support for Building Owners

The City provide funding, expertise and support to help building owners reduce emissions in their residential, commercial, industrial and institutional buildings.

SolarTO

Information and resources to help Toronto residents and businesses assess the rooftop solar potential of their properties

Heating & Cooling with a Heat Pump

Find out how a heat pump system can completely replace your furnace and air-conditioner.