Agencies serving the Aboriginal community in Toronto estimate that there are 70,000 residents from this community.

  • In 2006, there were 31,910 aboriginal persons living in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). This represents 2.7 per cent of all aboriginal persons in Canada and 13.2 per cent of those in Ontario. From 2001-2006, the aboriginal population in the GTA went from 23.950 to 31,910, an increase of 33.2 per cent.
  • Among aboriginal persons in the City, 67.1 per cent were First Nations, 26.8 per cent Métis, and 1.4 per cent Inuit.

Aboriginal Identity refers to those persons who reported identifying with at least one Aboriginal group (North American Indian, Métis or Inuit), or those who reported being a Treaty Indian or a Registered Indian as defined by the Indian Act of Canada, or those who reported they were members of an Indian band or First Nation.

Census counts for aboriginal identity include persons living in private households only. Individuals who lived in collective residences, institutions or were homeless at the time of the enumeration are not reflected. The results of the 2006 Census may be under counting actual population numbers. The number of urban aboriginal persons reported by the Census has historically been sharply lower than estimates from agencies serving this community. In 2006, Aboriginal agencies estimated that there were approximately 70,000 Aboriginal people living in the City of Toronto.

Note: Agencies serving the Aboriginal community in Toronto estimate that there are 70,000 residents who belong to this community.

  • In 2006, there were 31,910 aboriginal person living in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). This represents 2.7 per cent of all aboriginal persons in Canada and 13.2 per cent of those in Ontario. From 2001-2006, the aboriginal population in the GTA went from 23.950 to 31,910, an increase of 33.2 per cent.
  • The aboriginal population of the GTA has a lower median age (31.7 years) than the non-aboriginal population (37.3 years). The GTA aboriginal population includes higher proportions of children (22.1 per cent vs 18.7 per cent) and youth (16 per cent vs 13.4 per cent). The proportion of seniors, meanwhile, is significantly lower (4.6 per cent vs 11.4 per cent).
  • At the same time, women outnumber men in all age groups except those fourteen years and younger
  • 13,605 persons (0.5 per cent) of persons in the City of Toronto were aboriginal. Aboriginal persons in the City comprise 42.6 per cent of the aboriginal population in GTA. From 2001-2006,  the number of aboriginal persons in the City increased by 2,235 (19.7 per cent).
  • Among aboriginal persons in the City, 67.1 per cent were First Nations, 26.8 per cent Métis, and 1.4 per cent Inuit.

  • While aboriginal persons comprise only 2 per cent of its population, in absolute numbers, Ontario had the largest aboriginal population of any province or territory. In 2006, there were 242,490 aboriginal persons living in Ontario, representing 20.7 per cent of the Canadian total.
  • From 2001-2006, the aboriginal population of Ontario increased by 28.8 per cent, a rate faster than that of Canada as whole. Over this period, the number of aboriginal persons living in Ontario grew by 54,175 persons.
  • Aboriginal persons are increasingly living off reserve. According to the census, 54 per cent of aboriginal persons lived in or near a city.
  • Despite this, only 15.7 per cent of aboriginal persons lived in one of the country’s six major metropolitan areas. Among these, Edmonton had the largest aboriginal population (52,100 persons) followed by Vancouver (40,310), Toronto (26,576), Calgary (26,575), Ottawa (20,590) and Montreal (17,865).

  • In 2006, there were 1,172,785 aboriginals in Canada. Aboriginals accounted for 3.8 per cent of the total population of 31,241,030.
  • Nationally, 59.5 per cent of aboriginals were North American Indian, 33.2 per cent were Métis, 4.3 per cent were Inuit, 0.7 per cent had multiple aboriginal identities and 2.3 per cent were other aboriginal responses.
  • From 2001-2006, the aboriginal population in Canada increased by 196,475. Over this period, aboriginal population grew by 20.1 per cent, a rate five times that of the non-aboriginal population.
  • Across the country, the highest concentration of Aboriginal population can be found in Nunavut (85 per cent), Northwest Territories (50.3 per cent), Yukon Territory (25.1 per cent), Manitoba (15.5 per cent) and Saskatchewan (14.9 per cent).