Article V, Chapter 192, Public Service, Toronto Municipal Code

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Position

Vote* Attend All Candidates Meetings* Support or oppose a candidate and/or political party in federal, provincial and municipal elections, except Toronto’s Support or oppose a candidate in a Toronto municipal election Canvass or campaign on a Toronto municipal referendum question Contribute financially to a campaign (except to a Toronto election campaign or referendum question) Seek appointment or election to political office in accordance with employer and statutory leave requirements

Be a member of a political party

Yes = Permitted Political Activity          and          No = Restricted Political Activity

City Manager, City Solicitor, Deputy City Manager

Yes

Yes No No No No No

No

City Clerk and employees that support the City Clerk to administer a Toronto election

Yes

Yes No No No No No

No

Division Heads and Heads of Large Agencies[1]

Yes

Yes No No No Yes Yes

Yes

Designated Directors and similar positions, and heads of small agencies[2]

Yes

Yes Yes No No Yes Yes

Yes

Employees responsible to enforce Article II, Election Signs of  Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 693, Signs

Yes

Yes Yes No No Yes Yes

Yes

Employees who prosecute City by-laws or Provincial statutes

Yes

Yes Yes No No Yes Yes

Yes

Employees who routinely provide governance and procedural advice directly to City Council, Agency Boards and their Committees or in the operation of the Office of the Mayor and Members’ Offices

Yes

Yes Yes No No Yes Yes

Yes

Employees recruited by the City Clerk to support a Toronto election or referendum question

Yes

Yes Yes

No

(in the Toronto election they are working in)

No

(in the Toronto municipal referendum question they are working in)

Yes Yes

Yes

All other employees Most political activity is allowed, as permitted by Toronto Public Service Bylaw. However, if an employee feels that their political activity may appear to impact their duties or political neutrality, they should disclose it to their supervisor, manager, or Ethics Executive who may provide advice on how to balance their rights with their public service duties.

*All employees have the right to vote and attend all-candidates meetings.[1] Large Agencies include Exhibition Place, Toronto Parking Authority, Toronto Public Health, Toronto Transit Commission, and Toronto Zoo.[2] Small Agencies include Arena Boards, AOCCs, Heritage Toronto, Toronto Civic Theatres, Toronto Atmospheric Fund, and Yonge-Dundas Square.