In March 2014, the City of Toronto identified 31 Toronto neighbourhoods to be designated as Neighbourhood Improvement Areas (NIAs) under the Toronto Strong Neighbourhoods Strategy 2020 (TSNS2020).

To support the work of TSNS2020 in the 31 NIAs, the City produced Neighbourhood Improvement Area profiles for each of the 31 designated neighbourhoods. The demographics of the Neighbourhood Improvement Areas (NIAs) are presented below in statistical profiles and maps. NIAs are supported by Neighbourhood Action Teams; for more information please visit the Toronto Strong Neighbourhoods 2020 page.

NOTE: More up to date neighbourhood profiles are now available using data from the 2016 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada. These profiles are available for all 140 Toronto neighbourhoods, including the 31 NIAs. You can find the neighbourhood profiles at Neighbhourhood Profiles page.

Map of toronto nias neighbourhood improvement areas

Between 2005 and 2013, the City of Toronto identified 13 Priority Areas (also called Priority Neighbourhoods and Priority Improvement Neighbourhoods) through the Neighbourhood Action Plan. These 13 PAs have been replaced by the newer NIAs above but their socio-demographic legacy profiles have been preserved for historical comparison purposes below.

Priority Area Maps (2005-2013)

Priority Area Profiles 2011

What data sources does this profile use?

This profile uses data sources from the Community Data Program (www.communitydata.ca). Data on population, age, sex, dwellings, living arrangements, family structure and language comes from the 2011 Census. Data on immigration, ethnicity, visibility minority status, education, labour, housing and income comes from the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). Users should use caution when using data from the NHS.

What is the National Household Survey (NHS)?

The 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) is a voluntary survey of the population conducted on the same day as the 2011 Census of the Population. Questions asked in the NHS were asked in previous years in the “long-form” Census.

How does the NHS differ from Census?

Although very similar to the previous “long-form” Census, users should treat the NHS as a new and separate data source. The NHS is a voluntary survey, compared to the Census which is mandatory. This change in methodology means that NHS data is not comparable to Census data.

Can I compare the numbers from the 2011 NHS to those from the 2006 (or earlier) Census?

No. Because of the change from a mandatory to a voluntary sample, the NHS may under-report the number of people belonging to certain subgroups. This is referred to as “non-response bias”. For example, those with lower incomes are less likely than others to complete the NHS. As a result, the data presented here may underestimate the true number of those with low incomes.

The numbers presented in this profile should therefore be considered as an estimation of the population, rather than a true count of the population.

Data from the 2011 Census

Private Dwellings

The private dwellings occupied by usual residents universe is composed of variables which pertain to characteristics of dwellings in Canada. Dwellings are distinct from households. Dwelling characteristics refer to the physical attributes of a set of living quarters, whereas household characteristics pertain to the person or the group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy a private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada.

Single-Detached House

The private dwellings occupied by usual residents universe is composed of variables which pertain to characteristics of dwellings in Canada. Dwellings are distinct from households. Dwelling characteristics refer to the physical attributes of a set of living quarters, whereas household characteristics pertain to the person or the group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy a private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada.

Apartment 5 Storeys or more

A dwelling unit in a high-rise apartment building which has five or more storeys.

Semi-detached House

One of two dwellings attached side by side (or back to back) to each other, but not attached to any other dwelling or structure (except its own garage or shed). A semi-detached dwelling has no dwellings either above it or below it, and the two units together have open space on all sides.

Row House

One of three or more dwellings joined side by side (or occasionally side to back), such as a townhouse or garden home, but not having any other dwellings either above or below. Townhouses attached to a high-rise building are also classified as row houses.

Duplex

One of two dwellings, located one above the other, may or may not be attached to other dwellings or buildings.

Apartment less than 5 Storeys

A dwelling unit attached to other dwelling units, commercial units, or other non-residential space in a building that has fewer than five storeys.

Census Family

Refers to a married couple (with or without children), a common-law couple (with or without children) or a lone parent family.

Living Arrangements

Refers to the classification of persons as members of a family household or of a non-family household, that is, whether or not they are living in a household that contains at least one census family, and whether they are members of a census family or not in a census family. Persons not in census families are further classified as living with relatives, living with non-relatives (only) or living alone.

Mother Tongue (Single Response)

Refers to the first language learned at home in childhood and still understood by the individual on May 10, 2011. Reported figures are for those who do not identify multiple languages.

Home Languages (Single Response)

Refers to the language spoken most often or on a regular basis at home by the individual on May 10, 2011. Reported figures are for those who do not identify multiple languages.

Non-Official Mother Tongue / Non-Official Home Language

Language other than English or French.

Knowledge of Official Languages

Refers to the ability to conduct a conversation in English only, in French only, in both English and French, or in neither English nor French.

Data from the 2011 National Household Survey

Period of Immigration

Period of immigration refers to the period in which the immigrant first obtained his or her landed immigrant/permanent resident status. A landed immigrant/permanent resident is a person who has been granted the right to live permanently in Canada by immigration authorities. Some immigrants have resided in Canada for a number of years, while others have arrived recently. Some immigrants are Canadian citizens, while others are not. Most immigrants are born outside Canada, but a small number are born in Canada. In the 2011 National Household Survey, ‘Immigrants’ includes immigrants who landed in Canada prior to May 10, 2011.

Birth Country

Place of birth refers to the name of the province, territory or country in which the person was born. It may refer to a province or territory if the person was born in Canada. It refers to a country if the person was born outside Canada. The geographic location is specified according to boundaries current at the time the data are collected, not the boundaries at the time of birth.

Ethnic Origin

Ethnic origin refers to the ethnic or cultural origins of the respondent’s ancestors.

Visible Minority

Visible minority refers to whether a person belongs to a visible minority group as defined by the Employment Equity Act and, if so, the visible minority group to which the person belongs. The Employment Equity Act defines visible minorities as ‘persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.’ The visible minority population consists mainly of the following groups: South Asian, Chinese, Black, Filipino, Latin American, Arab, Southeast Asian, West Asian, Korean and Japanese.

Educational Attainment

Information indicating the person’s most advanced certificate, diploma or degree.

Labour Force Status

Refers to whether a person was employed, unemployed or not in the labour force during the week of Sunday, May 1 to Saturday, May 7, 2011.

Participation Rate

Refers to the labour force in the week of Sunday, May 1 to Saturday, May 7, 2011, expressed as a percentage of the population aged 15 years and over.

Employment Rate

Refers to the number of persons employed in the week of Sunday, May 1 to Saturday, May 7, 2011, expressed as a percentage of the total population aged 15 years and over.

Unemployment Rate

Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week of Sunday, May 1 to Saturday, May 7, 2011.

Housing Affordability

Refers to the proportion of average monthly 2010 total household income which is spent on owner’s major payments (in the case of owner-occupied dwellings) or on gross rent (in the case of tenant-occupied dwellings).

Housing Suitability

Housing suitability refers to whether a private household is living in suitable accommodations according to the National Occupancy Standard (NOS); that is, whether the dwelling has enough bedrooms for the size and composition of the household. A household is deemed to be living in suitable accommodations if its dwelling has enough bedrooms, as calculated using the NOS. Housing suitability assesses the required number of bedrooms for a household based on the age, sex, and relationships among household members. An alternative variable, the number of persons per room, considers all rooms in a private dwelling and the number of household members. Housing suitability and the National Occupancy Standard (NOS) on which it is based were developed by Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) through consultations with provincial housing agencies.

After-Tax Household Income

The after-tax income of a household is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that household.

Low-Income Measure (After-Tax) / LIM-AT

The Low-income measure after tax (LIM-AT) is a fixed percentage (50%) of median adjusted after-tax income of households observed at the person level, where ‘adjusted’ indicates that a household’s needs are taken into account.