Vitamin C is important for:

  • Keeping your skin and gums healthy
  • Maintaining your immunity
  • Helping your body absorb non-heme iron (a type of iron found in eggs and plant based foods)

Vitamin C is found in vegetables and fruit. A diet rich in vegetables and fruit may help reduce the risk of heart disease and some types of cancer. Check out Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide and see how much vegetables and fruit you need to eat each day.

Your Daily Vitamin C Needs

2-3 years = 15 mg
4-8 years = 25 mg
9-13 years = 45 mg

Males 14-18 years = 75 mg
Females 14-18 years = 65 mg
Males 19+ years = 90 mg
Females 19+ years = 75 mg

18 years and under = 80 mg
19+ years = 85 mg

18 years and under = 115 mg
19+ years = 120 mg

If you smoke, you may need more vitamin C. Speak to your dietitian to help you plan healthy meals and snacks that will provide you with enough vitamin C and other nutrients.

Sources of Vitamin C

Excellent Sources of Vitamin C (at least 30 mg of vitamin C or 50% DV per serving)

Food Sources Serving Size Milligrams (mg) of Vitamin C % Daily Value (DV)
Green pepper, cooked 125 mL 132 220
Sweet red pepper, raw or cooked 125 mL 100-121 170-200
Kale, raw 250 mL 85 140
Kiwi 1 medium 71 120
Orange 1 medium 70 120
Lychees 10 69 120
Green pepper, raw 125 mL 63 110
Lemon juice 125 mL 59 100
100% fruit juice with vitamin C added 125 mL 33-58 60-100
Broccoli, boiled 125 mL 54 90
100% orange juice 125 mL 51 90
Strawberry 125 mL 45 80
Snow peas, boiled 125 mL 41 70
Pineapple 125 mL 39 70
Cantalopue 125 mL 31 50
Cabbage 125 mL 30 50

 

Health Canada’s Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide provides examples on how you can measure serving sizes.