Access curriculum-based programs for Grade 3 and Grade 8 students. Visit Archives for a map-based program that addresses two Grade 3 units. Also, come explore Archives and Toronto’s engagement with public health issues since the founding of the Department of Public Health in 1883 – this is a program that addresses units in the Grade 8 curriculum.

Visit the Archives for a map-based program which addresses two Grade 3 units: Communities in Canada, 1780-1850, and Living and Woking in Ontario.

Booking information

  • Advance booking is required. Please contact the Archives at 416-392-5561 or at archives@toronto.ca to book a program.
  • The program is free and lasts one-and-a-half to two hours.
  • Minimum group size is 10, maximum is 30.
  • The program can be adjusted to meet your class’s schedule or special needs, including ESL classes.

This City of Toronto Archives program will fulfill the following expectations from the Grade 3 curriculum:

Heritage and Identity: Communities in Canada, 1780 – 1850

  • use primary sources to locate key information on challenges faced by early 19th century rural communities
  • describe similarities and differences between aspects of 19th and 21st century life
  • investigate challenges that urban communities faced in early 19th century Canada
  • describe impact of urban settlement on the natural environment

People and Environments: Living and Working in Ontario

  • use primary sources to locate key information about early 19th century Toronto
  • investigate how local government provides specific services and regulated development according to local needs
  • describe major types of land use and how they address human needs and wants
  • compare and contrast the changing aspects of land use in Toronto from 1793 to 1857
  • analyze and construct maps showing different land uses

The Student Experience

During their visit, students will use 18th and 19th century maps and charts to:

  • see how the environment has influenced land use and settlement patterns
  • investigate the impact human activities have on the physical environment
  • discuss the effects these changes had on communities and the individuals within them
  • learn basic components of a topographic map, including legends, scales and contours
  • students will have the opportunity to construct the own map of an urban community

Come to the Archives to explore Toronto’s engagement with public health issues since the founding of the Department of Public Health in 1883. This program addresses units in the Grade 8 History and Healthy Living curricula.

Booking information

  • Advance booking is required. Please contact the Archives at 416-392-5561 or at archives@toronto.ca to book a program.
  • The program is free and lasts one-and-a-half to two hours.
  • Minimum group size is 10, maximum is 30.
  • The program can be adapted for other grades.
  • The Archives thanks Toronto Public Health for its support and assistance in the development of this program.

Curriculum expectations

Students will learn how diseases are caused, spread, cured and contained. They will understand the importance of personal and public hygiene, the importance of decent living conditions, and the necessity of a public healthcare program

Canada: A Changing Society

Analyze key similarities and differences between Canada in 1890-1914, and the present-day factors contributing to change in Canadian society.

Grade 8 healthy living

  • Understanding health concepts.
    • Demonstrate understanding of factors that contribute to healthy development.
  • Make connections for healthy living.
    • Demonstrate the ability to make connections that relate to health and wellbeing – how factors in the world can have a major effect on your health.
  • Making healthy choices.
    • Apply health knowledge and living skills to make reasoned decisions and take appropriate actions relating to personal health and well-being.

The Student Experience

During their visit, students will work in groups and use archival materials to

  • analyze the diseases and health problems that were and are prevalent in Toronto
  • find the cause of diseases, and explore the methods used by Toronto Public Health to combat them
  • assume the role of City councillors, arguing for or against enhanced public health campaigns