Solid Waste Management Services is responsible for collecting, transporting, processing, composting and disposal of municipal and some private sector waste. This includes garbage, Blue Bin recyclables, Green Bin organics, litter, yard waste, over-sized and metal items, as well as household hazardous waste and electronic waste. SWMS’ goal is to be a leader in providing innovative waste management services within the City of Toronto in a safe, efficient, and courteous manner, creating environmental sustainability, promoting waste diversion and maintaining a clean city.

Budget Notes

To be a leader in providing innovative waste management services to residents, businesses and visitors within the City of Toronto in an efficient, effective and courteous manner, creating environmental sustainability.

View the Solid Waste Program Map in greater detail.

Solid Waste Management Services is responsible for collecting, transporting, processing, and disposal of municipal and some private sector waste. SWMS’ goal is to be a leader in providing innovative waste management services within the City of Toronto in a safe, efficient, and courteous manner, creating environmental sustainability, promoting waste diversion and maintaining a clean city.

2018 Operating Budget Summary

The total cost to deliver these services to Toronto residents, businesses and visitors is $382.163 million gross with a $23.026 million net reserve contribution largely the result of impacts related to prior year contract amendments with Canada Fibers Ltd (CFL) of $5.6 million net.

For 2018, $13.8 million in opening budget pressures were identified arising from operating requirements and have been offset by expenditure reductions and revenue adjustments including a 1.9% blended rate increase.

 

Fast Facts

  • Services include management of garbage, Blue Bin recyclables, Green Bin organics, litter, yard waste, oversized and metal items, as well as household hazardous waste and electronic waste, delivered through:
    • 7 Transfer Stations (6 with Household Hazardous Waste Depots)
    • 1 Organics Processing Facility with another under expansion.
    • 1 Reuse Centre
    • 4 Collection Yards and 1 Litter Collection Yard
    • Green Lane Landfill + 160 Closed Landfills
    • 4 million residential bins (Green/Waste/Blue/Kitchen Catchers)
    • Over 600 vehicles and pieces of equipment.

 

Trends

  • 528,277 tonnes of waste are projected to be landfilled in 2017 with 528,277 in 2018.
  • Curbside Collection complaints per year decreased by 45% in 2013 and a further 10% in 2014. 2015 saw an increase of 46%, then a decrease of 17% in 2016 and is projected to further decrease by 6% in 2017.
  • Overall Residential Diversion has increased from 44% to 53% from 2008 – 2017 and is projected to be at 53% in 2018 as shown below
  • The increase in diversion is attributed to increased tonnes in organics material collected but some gains are offset by additional lightweight packaging and less garbage overall collected.

 

Key Service Deliverables for 2018

In moving forward towards 70% overall waste diversion, SWMS has established strategic objectives with the following 2018 deliverables:

  • Planning and implementation of the Long Term Waste Management Strategy.
  • Landfill Gas Utilization Studies (GLL and Keele Valley).
  • Commissioning of Dufferin Organics Facility.
  • Review of opportunities for decommissioned Dufferin Material Recycling Facility.
  • Fleet governance and inventory.
  • Development of Renewable Natural Gas infrastructure.
  • Continued rollout of Compressed Natural Gas vehicles.
  • Full automation of organics collection.
  • Deliver new 10 Year residential bin maintenance contract.
  • Non-compliance project for nights collection.
  • Development of new KPIs.
  • Implementation of business intelligence technology.
  • Textiles research.
  • Ongoing monitoring and maintenance plan for the perpetual care closed landfill sites.
  • Ongoing installation of landfill gas control and leachate control as legislated, as well as ongoing engineering, development and monitoring of the Green Lane landfill site.

 

Our Key Issues & Priority Actions

  • Moving toward 70% waste diversion and balancing this target with program sustainability. This is being addressed through:
    • The Long Term Waste Strategy establishes diversion targets and guides future SWMS activities and investment in the City for the next 30 to 50 years.
    • Continuation of efforts to prioritize the 3Rs, enhance existing programs and implement new recommendations to help achieve 70% Diversion.
  • Moving Towards a Fully Sustainable Utility – ensuring generated rate revenue is adequate to support SWMS’ operating pressures, capital needs, as well as allow for the continued transition to a fully sustainable utility model, reducing the application of recoverable debt when appropriate.
    • A 1.9% blended rate increase is recommended for 2018 with annual blended rate increases over the next 3 years to ensure sufficient capital funding for future initiatives that maximize the lifespan of the Green Lane landfill.
    • This multi-year fee/rate strategy will be adjusted so that the 10-Year Capital Plan will be funded primarily through reserve funds, supported by annual operating contributions funded from user fees revenue.

 

2018 Operating Budget Highlights

  • The 2018 Operating Budget for SWMS of $382.163 million in gross expenditures provides:
    • $23 million to contribute to the capital reserve to fund Waste Management Strategies and SOGR works.
    • $34 million in contributions to the debt reserve fund for general debt servicing and loan repayment, as well as updated contract pricing increases for the processing and collection; and planning for implementation of new contracts.
  • The Program has offset budgetary increases from 2017 Approved Budget mainly due to the following:
    • Various Base expenditure adjustments and reductions ($10.4 million), see Table 2.
    • Revenue adjustments including the rate increases, volume adjustments, Stewardship funding, the re-sale of recyclables and hydro recoveries ($11.5 million).

Solid Waste Management Services (SWMS) is responsible for maintaining infrastructure valued at approximately $540 million excluding landfills, comprised of 7 transfer stations, 2 organics processing facilities, 5 collection yards and approximately of 1.6 million organics, recycling and waste bins. Landfills include the active Green Lane Landfill and 160 closed landfills.

The 2018-2027 Capital Plan totaling $626.9 million focuses on funding major diversion facilities to advance the City’s goal of 70% Waste Diversion by investing in facilities and systems necessary to achieve this target as well as to continue Collection Yard and Transfer Station Asset Management, landfill cell development and Perpetual Care of closed landfills. The 10-Year Capital Plan includes funding of $158 million for the Council approved Long Term Waste Management.

 

Where does the money go?

The 2018–2027 Capital Budget and Plan totaling $626.876 million provides funding for:

  • Legislated projects for the ongoing development of the Green Lane Landfill and perpetual care of closed landfills.
  • State of Good Repair (SOGR) projects to improve and maintain transfer station, collection yard and diversion facilities’ capacity and effectiveness.
  • Service Improvement projects that include the maintenance and life-cycle replacement of all bins as well as building gas utilization facilities. The Waste Strategy is an integral part of Service Improvement projects.
  • Growth related projects that are focused on building additional organics and waste processing capacity.at the Dufferin and Disco sites.

 

Where does the money come from?

The 10-Year Capital Plan is funded by two major sources:

  • Capital financing of $444.432 million or 70.9% will be provided primarily from the Waste Management Reserve Fund, with annual contributions to the reserve generated from user fee (rate) revenue in the Operating Budget.
  • Recoverable debt funding of $182.444 million comprises 29.1% of SWMS 10-year capital funding. The City initially funds this debt; SWMS then repays the debt servicing costs over its term through the collection of user fees in their Operating Budget.

 

State of Good Repair Backlog

The Solid Waste Management Program does not currently have a backlog of State of Good Repair (SOGR).  The funding allocated in the 10-Year Capital Plan for SWMS for SOGR projects for 2018 and future years is deemed appropriate to maintain the assets in a state of good repair. The Program is undertaking an asset condition assessment and will report any changes to their SOGR backlog during future Capital Budget processes.

 

Key Issues & Priority Actions

  • Waste Strategy Implementation – The SWMS’ capital program is driven primarily by the City’s Waste Strategy and long term infrastructure demands.
    • SWMS has developed a Waste Strategy that will guide how the City’s waste will be managed over the next 30 – 50 years.
    • The 2018 – 2027 Capital Budget and Plan includes funding of $158 million for the Waste Strategy as approved by Council in July 2016.
  • Long-Term Capital Funding – To ensure generated rate revenue is adequate to support SWMS’ 10-year capital needs as well as allow for the continued transition to a fully sustainable utility model, reducing the application of recoverable debt when appropriate.
    • The 2018 Recommended Operating Budget for SWMS includes a 1.9% rate increase to ensure sufficient capital funding for future diversion programs and facilities that maximize the lifespan of the Green Lane landfill beyond 2029, as well as ensure effective solid waste management and disposal.
    • Future long term funding quantifying factors include pending legislative changes, future revenue opportunities around biogas, additional DC contributions and to be determined efficiency/financial gains from reduced contamination of recyclables.

 

2018 Capital Budget Highlights

The 2018 Recommended Capital Budget for SWMS of $92.801 million, excluding carry forward funding, will:

  • Continue improving and maintaining Transfer Stations and Collection Yards and Diversion Facilities ($28.3 million);
  • Continue developing the Green Lane Landfill ($11.3 million) ­­­­­with Gas Utilization projects ($1 million) and providing perpetual care of closed landfills ($13.3 million);
  • Complete building organics processing & waste capacity at the Dufferin & Disco facilities ($24.2 million);
  • Continue improving business practices enabled by technology projects and Engineering Planning ($6.9 million);
  • Continue implementation of approved Waste Strategy options ($4.1 million).
  • Continue improving Diversion Systems with single family & multi-unit organics & recycling containers ($2.3 million);

Solid Waste Management Services 2018 Budget Infographic

Solid Waste Management Services Infographic