The Final Preferred Plans for George Hislop Park, Norman Jewison Park, and Alexander Street Parkette are available in the Design section.

The Yonge Street Linear Park network provides vital green space and a popular pedestrian route parallel to Yonge Street in the Church-Wellesley neighbourhood. The revitalization project includes George Hislop Park, Norman Jewison Park and Alexander Street Parkette. The park improvements will be guided by the Yonge Street Linear Park Master Plan 2017.

Project Timeline

  • Fall 2020 to Winter 2021: Community engagement and design
  • Winter to Spring 2021: Construction documents and approvals
  • Fall 2022: Construction of George Hislop Park and Norman Jewison Park starts
  • Summer 2023: Construction of Alexander Street Parkette starts
  • Fall 2023: Construction for all three parks complete

The timeline is subject to change.

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January 2022

The Final Preferred Plan for all three parks is available in the Design section of this page.

Phase 2: Preferred Plans

The City led a second round of community engagement for the preferred plans for all three parks using previous stakeholder and community feedback. The preferred  plans were informed by a virtual public meeting, an online survey, a Community Resource Group, and discussions with local community groups.

Download the What We Heard (Phase 2) Report.

March 2021

Online Survey

From February 17 to March 12, 2021, feedback on the preferred plans for all three parks was collected in an online survey.

February 2021

Virtual Public Meeting 2

On February 17, 2021, a virtual public meeting took place to present the Final Preferred Plan for George Hislop Park, Norman Jewison Park, and Alexander Street Parkette. Feedback collected during Phase 1 was also presented with an explanation of how this input was integrated into the preferred design plans.

Download the:

Community Resource Group Meeting 3

On February 9, 2021,  a Community Resource Group meeting took place. The group includes community stakeholders who share their knowledge of the neighbourhood in an advisory capacity.

Download the meeting summary.

Phase 1: Early Plans

The City led a first round of community engagement for the early designs plans for all three parks, which would help inform the development of a preferred plan.  Feedback was collected in a virtual public meeting, an online survey, a Community Resource Group, engagement with Indigenous communities and discussions with local community groups.

Download the What We Heard (Phase 1) Report.

November 2020

Online Survey

From November 4 to November 29, 2021, feedback on the early plans for all three parks was collected in an online survey.

Download the survey results.

Virtual Public Meeting

On November 5, 2021, the project team presented preliminary park plans and refinements of the 2017 Master Plan for George Hislop Park, Norman Jewison Park, and Alexander Street Parkette to the community. Community perspectives and priorities were identified in this meeting.

October 2020

Community Resource Group Meeting 2

On October 30, 2020, a Community Resource Group meeting took place. The group includes community stakeholders who share their knowledge of the neighbourhood in an advisory capacity.

Download the:

September 2020

Community Resource Group Meeting 1

On September 21, 2020, a Community Resource Group meeting took place. The group includes community stakeholders who share their knowledge of the neighbourhood in an advisory capacity.

Download the

The Final Preferred Plan for all three parks was developed using feedback collected from the community in 2020 and 2021.

While we aim to provide fully accessible content, there is no text alternative available for some of the content on this site. If you require alternate formats or need assistance understanding our maps, drawings, or any other content, please contact Nancy Chater at 416-338-5237 or Nancy.Chater@toronto.ca.

Alexander Street Parkette

The image shows a coloured plan for park improvements in Alexandre Street Parkette that include a sidewalk for pedestrian crossing, a tree grove, new custom seating, an unfenced dog relief area, open lawn space, bicycle parking, and new plantings. Existing trees are preserved and new trees will be added.

  1. Community Plaza
  2. Garden area with accessible walkway
  3. Tree grove with swivel seating
  4. Customized bench seating
  5. Swivel seating
  6. Promenade
  7. Laneway mews
  8. Dog relief area (unfenced)
  9. Horticultural plantings
  10. Lawn
  11. Bicycle parking
  12. Garage exit pavilion

George Hislop Park

The image shows a coloured plan for park improvements in George Hislop Park that include new central path, new benches, new lighting, a new central plaza with seating, lighting, and pink toned paving that is part of the integrated LGBTQ2s+ art in the park, steel arches that cross overhead at various locations along the central path, table and chair seating area, a small playground, trees, lawn areas and horticultural planting beds. Existing trees are preserved and new trees will be added. There are a few locations for small dog relief areas, which are unfenced and require the dogs to be on-leash.

  1. Tree grove with circular benches
  2. Steel arch with lighting
  3. Drinking fountain
  4. Existing access to café
  5. Dog relief area (unfenced)
  6. Tree grove with swivel seating
  7. Customized bench seating
  8. Upgraded fence
  9. Central plaza with integrated LGBTQ2S+ public art
  10. Playground
  11. Horticultural plantings
  12. Lawn
  13. TTC vent shaft
  14. Bicycle parking
  15. Pedestrian crossing

Norman Jewison Park

The image shows a coloured plan for park improvements in Norman Jewison Park that include new central path, new benches, new lighting, seating areas along the central path, steel arches that cross overhead at various locations along the central path, a table and chair seating area, trees, lawn areas and horticultural planting beds. Existing trees are preserved and new trees will be added. There is a low stone wall water feature that provides a custom design, dog drinking fountain and a dog relief area, which is an unfenced, on-leash area for dogs. This feature is a reimagined version of the older Barney's Fountain in the park. Bike parking is located at the south end of the park near the entrance.

  1. Sidewalk and pedestrian crossing
  2. Tree grove with circular benches
  3. Steel arch with lighting
  4. Drinking fountain
  5. Draining channel
  6. Tree grove with swivel seating
  7. Long custom bench
  8. Dog relief area (unfenced)
  9. Barney’s Fountain (low stone wall with water fountain for dogs)
  10. Horticultural plantings
  11. Lawn
  12. Bicycle parking
  13. Parking lot
  14. Pedestrian connections to parking lot

The improvements to George Hislop Park, Norman Jewison Park and Alexander Street Parkette are guided by the Yonge Street Linear Park Master Plan 2017, which established design principles through consultation with a focus on the creation of continuous accessible pathways, quality seating and site furnishings, maintaining existing trees, adding welcoming lighting and new features, and enhancing safety for all park users.

James Canning Gardens was included in the Master Plan and is complete as part of a separate project. The park reopened in 2020.

Yonge Street Linear Park System Master Plan 2017

In 2017, the City completed the Yonge Street Linear Park System Master Plan, which included a comprehensive conceptual plan for three parks in the linear system – James Canning Garden, George Hislop Park, Norman Jewison Park. All three parks are built over the Yonge Street subway system and together form an important “green spine” and a north-south pedestrian commuter route in the Church Wellesley neighbourhood, just east of Yonge Street.

Alexander Street Parkette was not included in the Master Plan but it is located in the same corridor just east of Yonge Street and has been added to this project to achieve a comprehensive approach to the neighbourhood parks.

Following the Master Plan, construction began in 2018 for the James Canning Gardens improvements. This project is associated with the development at 587 Yonge Street. Originally targeted for completion in early summer 2020, the work at James Canning Gardens is tied up in a legal issue involving the developer. The City is working to find the best way forward in order to allow for the completion of the park improvements.

Background Reports

Church Wellesley Village Neighbourhood Plan

The State of the Village Study and Neighbourhood Plan Report was undertaken by The 519 Church Street Community Centre to answer two questions central to the Church-Wellesley Village and LGBTQ2S+ “villages” around the world:

  • What is the role of an ‘LGBTQ2S+ Village’ in a modern and progressive city?
  • What must be done to support the Church-Wellesley Village to solidify its role as a major cultural community hub in the Toronto context?

These questions were brought on by unprecedented social and economic changes underway in Toronto and across North America. More visible than ever before but in a complex state of transition, the Church-Wellesley Village community faces questions around the future of the neighbourhood. How can the Church-Wellesley Village and the LGBTQ2S+ community work best with the forces of development, changes in societal norms, and the dispersal of LGBTQ2S+ hubs across the city to create a 21st-century community that honours its cultural diversity, identity and history, while retaining and reinvigorating its cultural relevance and economic vitality? A central objective of the project was to understand the Church-Wellesley Village community, draw lessons from other LGBTQ2S+ communities, and set a path towards building a stronger, healthier community prior to the international spotlight of World Pride 2014 and the 2015 Pan American Games and with lasting impact beyond these events.

While we aim to provide fully accessible content, there is no text alternative available for some of the content on this site. If you require alternate formats or need assistance understanding our maps, drawings, or any other content, please contact Nancy Chater at 416-338-5237 or Nancy.Chater@toronto.ca.

Project Renderings