Vision Zero improvements are being designed for two intersections in Flemingdon Park. They are along Deauville Lane at St. Dennis Drive and Deauville Lane at Grenoble Drive. The Vision Zero Road Safety Plan calls for engineering improvements where they are most needed to protect vulnerable users of our transportation system – people walking, children, seniors and people on bicycles.

A Public Drop-In Event was held on June 12, 2019 at the Dennis R. Timbrell Resource Centre. Members of the public were invited to speak with the project team, learn more and provide feedback on Vision Zero improvements being designed for Deauville Lane at Grenoble Drive and Deauville Lane at St. Dennis Drive in Flemingdon Park.

The Consultation Report, available below, summarizes consultation activities and feedback received in May and June 2019.

 

 

Consultation Report

These documents may not be fully accessible. For accessible formats or communications support, please contact: Robyn Shyllit, Sr. Public Consultation Coordinator. Telephone: 416-392-3358 Email: Robyn.Shyllit@toronto.ca.

Public Drop-In Event

Date: Wednesday, June 12
Time: 4–8 p.m.
Location: Dennis R. Timbrell Resource Centre, 29 St Dennis Dr, Toronto, M3C 3J3

The following materials were available at the event:

Plain Text Display Panels

Project Background

In 2013, the St. Dennis Drive and Deauville Lane intersection was identified as the second most dangerous intersections in Toronto. Vehicles speeding and hitting pedestrians while turning led to the most severe incidents.

In 2016, The City of Toronto released the Complete Streets Guidelines. They state that streets should safely accommodate all users – people walking, cycling, using transit and driving – and also enhance local neighbourhood character.

In 2018, the City of Toronto issued Guidelines on Right-Turn Channels, recommending their removal where feasible because they are not accessible for people with low or no vision.

Vision Zero Road Safety Plan

In 2018, Toronto City Council, as part of the Vision Zero Road Safety Plan, authorized the development of 10 intersection improvements across the city that can model the Complete Streets approach. Two have been identified in Flemingdon Park on Deauville Lane.

The City of Toronto’s Vision Zero Road Safety Plan includes engineering improvements to protect vulnerable users —people walking, children, older adults and people on bicycles.

Intersection Safety Improvements are part of the Vision Zero Road Safety Plan which aims to eliminate collisions that result in death and serious injury.

Intersection Safety Improvements

Intersection safety improvements provide a number of benefits:

  • Shorter crossing distances for pedestrians
  • Improved sight lines for people driving, walking
    and cycling
  • Reduced vehicle speeds where vulnerable road users are crossing
  • Increased sidewalk widths and pedestrian waiting areas at corners
  • Improved accessibility and user experience for people of all ages and abilities
  • Opportunities to improve the surrounding public space
  • Opportunities to improve conditions for people cycling

Deauville Lane and Grenoble Drive

Existing Conditions
  • More hard surfaces than is necessary and lack of green space
  • Right-turn channels are not accessible, especially for people with low or no vision; and they allow faster turns than necessary, putting vulnerable road users at risk
  • People walking have longer crossings than necessary, exposing them to vehicle traffic
Planned Intersection Improvements
  • Create shorter, more direct travel path for people walking
  • Maintain existing lanes
  • Maintain driveways and bus stops
  • Refresh pavement markings
  • Tighten corner radii to slow down turning vehicles
  • Replace right-turn channels with green space

Deauville Lane and St. Dennis Drive

Existing Conditions
  • People walking have longer crossing distances than necessary, exposing them to risk of collisions
  • Space for people walking, cycling and driving are not well defined at the corners
  • Motorists turning right, left and going straight share one lane, causing some to use the bike lane
  • Sidewalks are narrower than the current standard
  • Right-turn channels are not accessible, especially for people with low or no vision
  • Larger than necessary turn radii means vehicles turn faster than is safe
Planned Intersection Improvements
  • Shorten pedestrian crossing of vehicle lanes; add safety island
  • Create waiting areas to make people walking and cycling more visible
  • Maintain existing lanes and add dedicated right-turn lane
  • Maintain bus stops and driveways
  • Replace right-turn channel with corner safety islands to slow turning vehicles, widen sidewalks and expand green space
  • Separate cyclists from motor vehicles and pedestrians with safety islands

Next Steps

June – July 2019
  • Public Drop-In Event (Wednesday, June 12, 4-8pm)
  • Present design concepts and gather feedback
  • Review comments received after public event and incorporate any necessary design changes
Deauville Lane and Grenoble Drive
  • Finalize design in 2019
  • Planned for construction in 2022
Deauville Lane and St. Dennis Drive
  • Finalize design in 2019
  • Seek Council approval in 2020-2021
  • Planned for construction in 2022

Public notices will be issued prior to construction.

 

Click on the image to see a larger version.

Map showing intersection of Deauville Lane at St. Dennis Drive and Grenoble Drive
Map showing locations for intersection improvements

 

 

 

Rendering of potential improvement at Deauville Lane and Grenoble Drive
Rendering of potential Vision Zero improvements at Deauville Lane and Grenoble Drive. The right-turn lanes will be replaced by trees, plantings and places to sit. People walking and cycling will have shorter distances to cross the street.
Rendering of potential improvements at Deauville Lane and St. Dennis Drive
Rendering of potential Vision Zero improvements at Deauville Lane and St. Dennis Drive. The right-turn lane will be replaced with corner safety islands to slow turning vehicles and separate motor vehicles from people on foot and bike. People walking and cycling will have shorter distances to cross the street

What these changes could mean for you.

Improvements for pedestrians & cyclists

  • Shorter crossing distances
  • Wider sidewalks
  • Accessible pedestrian crossings
  • Slowed down turning vehicles
  • Separated turning lane for cyclists

Changes for motor vehicles

  • Better visibility of people on foot & bike
  • Minimal impacts on vehicle travel times
  • Separation from pedestrians & cyclists

Public space and green features

  • New trees and plantings
  • Permeable paving materials
  • Places to sit

No changes to

  • Bus stops or bus routes
  • Parking
  • Driveway access

2018: City Council, as part of its Vision Zero Road Safety Plan, authorized the development of 10 intersection improvements across the city that can model the Complete Streets approach (EX35.26).

2016: The City of Toronto released the Complete Streets Guidelines. They state that streets should safely accommodate all users – pedestrians, cyclists, transit services and motor vehicles – and also enhance local neighbourhood character.

2013: The St. Dennis Drive and Deauville Lane intersection was identified as one of the top three most dangerous in Toronto (PW23.12).