Register for the virtual public meeting on Monday, June 24, and complete the survey by July 19. View meeting materials in the Public Consultation tab below.

The Lawrence Park (LP) Transportation Plan builds on the 2018 Basement Flooding & Road Improvement Environmental Assessment recommendations to address concerns raised by the community about road safety, excessive speeding and traffic volumes. The LP Transportation Plan identifies changes that can be made to improve safety for all road users, with a focus on vulnerable road users such as pedestrians, people cycling, children and seniors.

The Lawrence Park Transportation Plan will not revisit the Council-approved recommendations identified through the Lawrence Park Road & Stormwater Management Study process.

Neighbourhood map for Lawrence Park study area. Lawrence Avenue on the north, Bayview Avenue on the east, the Sherwood Park and Lawrence Park Ravine network to the south and Yonge Street on the west.

The Lawrence Park Transportation Plan boundaries are Lawrence Avenue East on the north, Bayview Avenue on the east, the Sherwood Park and Lawrence Park Ravine network to the south and Yonge Street on the west.

The LP Transportation Plan study area includes the Lawrence Park Neighbourhood Road & Stormwater Management study area, as well as other neighbourhood streets for which additional study was undertaken.

In 2018, the City finalized the Lawrence Park Basement Flooding & Road Improvements Study, which made recommendations to address deteriorating road conditions, traffic and pedestrian safety, road drainage problems and basement flooding in the area.

The recommendations, which were approved by City Council in 2017 will be delivered through the Basement Flooding Protection Program.

Planned work includes:

  • Road narrowing and chicanes on streets where stormwater management infrastructure will be installed
  • New sidewalks on Mildenhall Road (east side), St. Leonards Avenue, Dawlish Avenue, Pinedale Road and Glenallen Road/ Strathgowan Crescent

Council-approved changes will not be revisited as part of the Transportation Plan.

In 2019, following the completion of the EA study, North York Community Council requested Transportation Services to develop a traffic management plan to address additional concerns raised by the community for implementation in coordination with the Basement Flooding Protection Program.

Neighbourhood map with changes approved through the Basement Flooding & Road Improvements Environmental Assessment process.

Data Review and Analysis

City staff have used a data-driven approach to understand existing conditions in Lawrence Park and develop potential changes.

Traffic data measuring vehicle volumes, speeds and turning movement counts:

  • Data collection was completed between 2021 and 2024.
  • Data is publicly available on the City’s Open Data portal.

Collision data collected by Toronto Police Services indicating the number of collisions resulting in death or serious injury:

  • Data collection for the period 2014 to 2024
  • Collision data is publicly available on the City’s Vision Zero Mapping Tool

Concerns and requests from the public and local Councillor:

  • Feedback shared throughout the EA process
  • Calls to 311 about traffic operations and road safety

Site visits and observations in the neighbourhood.

City Guidelines and Policies

Lawrence Park Transportation Plan recommendations are informed by the City’s Traffic Calming Policy, Vision Zero Road Safety Plan and Complete Streets Guidelines, and focus on speed management and road safety for all users.

The LP Transportation Plan considers changes that can be made to improve road safety and speed management. Vehicle volumes in Lawrence Park were within the working maximum capacity for local and collector roads, based on the City’s Road Classification System; no vehicle volume management measures are proposed.

The LP Transportation Plan involves several steps:

Step 1: Review feedback on local issues

Step 2: Develop a plan to address issues

Step 3: Consult the public on potential changes – We are here!

Step 4: Finalize LP Transportation Plan for approval by Community Council

Step 5: Implement approved LP Transportation Plan changes

As part of the 2018 Lawrence Park Neighbourhood Road & Stormwater Management Study, City Council approved the installation of new sidewalks that will help to improve road safety in the area. Sidewalks were approved on one side of five streets: Mildenhall Road (east side), St. Leonards Avenue, Dawlish Avenue, Pinedale Road and Glenallen Road/Strathgowan Crescent. Installation will take place alongside planned road and stormwater design and reconstruction delivered through the Basement Flooding Protection Program.

Proposed Traffic Signal

In addition to the approved sidewalks, the LP Transportation Plan recommends the installation of a traffic signal at the intersection of Lawrence Avenue East and Wanless Crescent (west side) to facilitate pedestrian crossing of Lawrence Avenue and access to Wanless Park. Currently, the closest traffic signals are located at Mount Pleasant Road to the west, and Mildenhall Road to the east.

Additional Road Safety Improvements

Where feasible, additional road safety improvements are recommended for implementation alongside planned road and stormwater design and reconstruction:

Intersection realignment modifies the layout of roads to improve safety. Modifications can include:

  • Reducing the crossing distance for pedestrians and increasing visibility among all road users
  • Realigning and/or narrowing vehicle lanes to reinforce appropriate speeds, lane positioning and yielding behaviour.

Raised crosswalks have a higher elevation that the adjacent roadway. Benefits include:

  • Improving visibility of pedestrians
  • Increasing motorist awareness of the crosswalk location
  • Encouraging slower driving speeds and better compliance at stop signs
  • Absence of a low spot at the ends of a crosswalk, reducing the amount of water/snow/ice accumulation

Neighbourhood map with locations for potential road safety changes identified.

Traffic studies collect precise travel speed data from motor vehicles. Studies completed between 2021 and 2024 suggest that there are local roads in the neighbourhood where motor vehicle operating speeds exceed 38 km/h (8 km/h above the posted limit).

City Council has already approved changes as part of the Basement Flooding & Road Improvement Environmental Assessment which will support speed management and encourage compliance with 30km/h speed limits. Council-approved changes include road narrowing and chicanes on streets that will be reconstructed through the Basement Flooding Protection Program. Implementation would take place between 2027 and 2032.

As part of the Lawrence Park Transportation Plan, additional speed management tools are being considered for nine streets that will not be reconstructed as part of the Basement Flooding Protection Program and where speeding was observed:

  • Dawlish Avenue (between Weybourne Crescent and Dundurn Road)
  • St. Leonard’s Avenue (between Weybourne Crescent and Mount Pleasant Road)
  • Buckingham Avenue (between Dinnick Crescent and Wanless Crecent)
  • Cheltenham Avenue (between Dinnick Crescent and St Ives Crescent)
  • Glengowan Road (between Mount Pleasant Road and Dundurn Road)
  • Dinnick Crescent (between Mount Pleasant Road and Cheltenham Avenue)
  • St. Leonards Crescent (between St Leonards Avenue and Dawlish Avenue)
  • Lympstone Avenue (between St Edmund’s Drive and Weybourne Crescent)
  • Lawrence Crescent (between Lympstone Avenue and Mount Pleasant Road)

Neighbourhood map with locations for potential speed management tools.

 

Three speed management tools are being considered for these nine streets: in-road flexible speed signs, chicanes and speed humps.

In-road flexible speed signs serve as both a visual reminder of the posted speed limit and a physical device to slow motor vehicle speeds as they pass the sign. Key considerations:

  • Can be installed in less than one year
  • May result in loss of vehicle parking

      Chicanes are a series of curb extensions on alternate sides of a roadway which narrow the roadway and require drivers to steer from one side to the other to travel through the chicane. Key considerations:

      • Would be implemented alongside planned roadwork (10+ years for some streets)

      Speed humps are raised sections of the roadway designed to discourage motorists from travelling at excessive speeds. They are installed mid-block and used on local and collector roads only. Key considerations:

      • Can be installed within the next two years
      • Requires Community Council approval

      The City of Toronto is inviting feedback on the Lawrence Park Transportation Plan. Public feedback, along with technical and policy considerations will be used to inform City staff recommendations and City Council decisions.

      The Public Consultation Period is June 10 – July 19, 2024.

      Virtual Public Meeting

      The meeting will include a presentation followed by a Question & Answer period.

      Date: Monday June 24, 2024

      Time: 6 – 8 p.m.

      • Register to join by computer, smartphone or tablet.
      • To join by phone (audio only) call 416-915-6530 and enter access code: 2632 767 5672. Participant ID: 57842749.

      Learn more about participating in City of Toronto virtual engagement events.

      If you require assistance to participate in this event, please contact us one week in advance.

      Consultation Materials

      Feedback

      Complete the online survey June 10 – July 19 to provide feedback on potential changes that are being considered as part of the LP Transportation Plan.

      Contact us to request a print copy of the survey.
      You can also submit comments by email, phone, or mail.

      To receive project emails, please email LawrencePark@toronto.ca to be added to the email list.