Over the next few years, the City of Toronto will deliver neighbourhood improvement projects in Thorncrest Village that includes Road Resurfacing, Green Streets Infrastructure installations and Basement Flooding Protection work.

In February 2018, the City held a Public Drop-In Event to present the planned projects to the neighbourhood and to receive feedback from residents. In order to address concerns that were raised by community members, the project team has revised the scope of work and construction schedule.

Please visit the News and Updates tab for more information.

November 2018 Update:

In September 2018, the City of Toronto distributed a construction notice and community update about the status of the planned neighbourhood improvements. The project team appreciates the community’s efforts to share concerns with the local councillor and in turn with City staff. Given the scope and scale of the projects planned in this community, there are numerous complexities that must be taken into account before the work can start. The City is moving forward as quickly as possible to confirm the necessary improvements and the order of their delivery. We apologize for the delay in this work and we appreciate the community’s patience.

View the Common Questions Sheet addressing many of the questions the community has brought to our attention.

September 2018 Update:

Map of Thorncrest Village, between Islington Kipling Rathburn and Plumbstead Court
Map of Thorncrest Village

On Tuesday, February 27th, a public drop-in event was held. The public was able to learn more about the proposed works and meet with City staff and local Councillor John Campbell.

Notice of Public Drop-In Event

Public Drop-In Display Boards 

Public Drop-In Feedback Form

Public Drop-In Common Questions 

Maps

To request assistance with any difficulties viewing these documents, call Khatija Sahib, 416-392-2962 or email Khatija.Sahib@toronto.ca.

Road Resurfacing

1. Will the City be resurfacing Thorncrest Road from Rathburn Road to Islington Avenue this fall?

The City of Toronto has inspected the road and determined that it will require a full reconstruction to bring it to a state of good repair. The reconstruction design is underway and the work is scheduled to begin in late-spring 2019.

2. Why was the fall road resurfacing in Thorncrest Village been delayed?

Road resurfacing previously scheduled to begin this fall has been rescheduled due to a delay in receiving locates from utility companies. November is not an ideal time to begin road work, therefore the resurfacing of Thorncrest Village roads listed below has been rescheduled for spring 2019. A Construction Notice will be distributed before work starts.

·         Plumbstead Court – Sir Williams Lane to Plumbstead Court Cul-De-Sac

·         Pheasant Lane – Rathburn Road to Pheasant Lane

·         The Wynd – Rathburn Road to Thorncrest Road

·         Northolt Court – Islington Avenue to Northolt Court Cul-De-Sac

·         Sir Williams Lane – Twyford Road to Plumbstead Court

·         Sir Williams Lane – Thorncrest Road to Thorncrest Road

3. Will there be traffic-calming measures throughout the work zone during the road reconstruction / resurfacing?

Appropriate measures will be taken to manage traffic in the area for the safety of workers, road users and residents. Where appropriate, flag personnel will be present at peak times, such as before and after school, and when work is taking place near a major intersection.

4. Will road resurfacing/reconstruction include sidewalk installation?

There will not be sidewalks added or removed within this area; the existing ditches will be restored.

Green Streets Infrastructure

5. Will new Green Streets Infrastructure involve adding ditches?

Green Streets Infrastructure does not involve adding new ditches. Green Street infrastructure includes trees, native plants, and low impact development (LID) stormwater technologies which allow stormwater to infiltrate, filter, store, evaporate, and impede runoff. Examples of LID include bioswales, rain gardens and bioretention cells. The City often selects existing ditched roads for LID infrastructure, as ditches are ideal locations for installing LIDs. Bioswales look like ditches, but they are a form of Green Streets Infrastructure that includes underground systems that promote water absorption.

6. Does Green Streets Infrastructure require maintenance? 

The maintenance of the Green Streets Infrastructure will depend on the type of infrastructure that is implemented. For example, rain gardens or planted bioretention cells will require landscape maintenance, including garbage and weed removal similar to what is done now. Sodded options will require similar maintenance to current grassed areas.

7. Who will maintain the new Green Streets Infrastructure?

The City will be responsible for the maintenance of the underground infrastructure (i.e. the parts that can’t be seen). Underground infrastructure includes underdrains, catch basins, and monitoring equipment. Maintenance of these structures includes inspection, downloading data and replacing batteries for monitoring equipment, and occasionally cleaning out subsurface features with vacuum trucks.

Property owners will be asked to help maintain the above-ground Green Streets Infrastructure. Maintenance activities required from residents will include: removing trash, weeding and cutting back overgrown vegetation. Homeowners will be provided an informational guide indicating their responsibilities and who to contact for maintenance needs.

8. Where will the Green Streets Infrastructure be installed?

The City has retained an engineering consultant to investigate options for Green Streets infrastructure in the City’s public right-of-way, the centre median or on the islands of roadways in Thorncrest Village. Optimal locations for Green Streets infrastructure will be selected based on several factors, including existing drainage patterns, ditches, soil type, and existing vegetation and infrastructure.

9. How long is the design phase?

Approximately nine months.

10. When will this work begin?

The design work has already begun, and construction will be coordinated with the basement flooding and road resurfacing work.

11. How will you consult the public?

The City will be reaching out to individual home owners affected by the planned work.

Basement Flooding Protection Program

12. Why is a detailed engineering analysis needed?

The City is undertaking further detailed engineering analysis following a review of resident concerns and responses to our flooding questionnaire. By undertaking this analysis, the City can determine if additional sewer system improvements are required.

13. What are some of the tasks of the analysis?

The analysis will include a review of new and previous collected background data and questionnaire results to identify the potential causes of flooding. This information, along with flow data, will be used in the development of a new computer model to analyze how the sanitary and storm sewer systems function during rainstorm events.

Based on the results of the modelling, the works required to meet the City’s criteria to reduce basement and surface flooding will be identified.

14. When will the analysis be completed? Can this analysis be completed any sooner?

Given the complexity of the analysis, the City now expects the study to be completed by mid-2019. The City is moving forward as quickly as possible to confirm the basement flooding improvements required to help address flooding in the neighbourhood.

15. What will happen after the study?

If the analysis confirms that the planned improvements are all that is required, the City will move forward to have the work constructed.

However, if the analysis identifies that additional storm sewer work is required, it must first meet the City Council adopted cost per benefitting property threshold of $32,000. This means that the cost of the work, based on the total number of properties that would benefit, must fall under $32,000 per property. The project will proceed to detailed design and construction once the costs are confirmed.

If the costs are above $32,000 per property, the work cannot be scheduled for construction.

16. Will the sewer upgrades affect private property?

The construction of sewer upgrades are within City’s right-of-way. Any sewer upgrades outside City property and any potential private property impacts will be identified and the City will work with property owners before the work is undertaken.

17. Will the sewer construction impact trees or landscaping?

The City takes measures to help avoid impacts to trees and landscaping features. Ahead of construction, the City will review any potential impacts and work with property owners to address any concerns.

Other Common Questions

18. Where is the City’s right of way and how does that affect one’s property?

The City’s Right-of-Way is the area that extends approximately 10 metres from the center of the road to the private property line. Features such as irrigation systems or fencing, heated driveways and landscaping that are located within the City’s property will be reviewed at the detailed design stage. The City will work closely with homeowners to address any concerns.

The City’s Right-of-Way is the area that extends approximately 10 metres from the center of the road to the private property line. Features such as irrigation systems or fencing, heated driveways and landscaping that are located within the City’s property will be reviewed at the detailed design stage. The City will work closely with homeowners to address any concerns.
City of Toronto Right of Way

19. Will any of the proposed construction impact trees or landscaping?

The City takes measures to help avoid impacts to trees and landscaping features. Ahead of construction, the City will review any potential impacts and work closely with homeowners to address any concerns. If this work affects a tree near your property, you will receive a separate notice. For every street tree removed due to City work, a replacement tree will be planted.