Our web exhibits cover a wide range of topics from Toronto’s history.

This exhibit examines significant municipal projects that were either never realized, or else built to one of a number of competing designs.

No Little Plans

In commemoration of the centenary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge, we follow the story behind the veterans within the Toronto civil service who took part in the 1936 pilgrimage to the Canadian National Vimy Memorial.

Pilgrimage to Vimy

The 1960-61 construction of a new bridge on Bayview Avenue over the West Don River, by the Metropolitan Toronto government.

Bayview Bridge

Learn about the massive public works project that bridged a river valley and stitched a growing city together.

Bridging the Don: the Prince Edward Viaduct

See panoramic photographs of armed forces battalions, downtown Toronto, construction projects and more.

A Stitch in Time

See a selection of Russell Spanner’s space-age yet functional furniture.

Space Age Furniture Lands in Toronto

Learn about the history of Toronto Hydro and the electrification of the city.

Turning on Toronto: A History of Toronto Hydro

Learn about some notable historical by-laws in the City of Toronto.

Historical By-laws

Donald Moore was a community leader and civil rights activist who fought to change Canada’s exclusionary immigration laws.

Caribbean Connection: One Man’s Crusade

As part of the City’s celebrations of Her Majesty’s Diamond Jubilee, the Archives looks back to some of her previous visits to our city.

Queen City: Her Majesty in Toronto

A look at Terry Fox’s visit to Scarborough during his Marathon of Hope in the summer of 1980.

Scarborough Welcomes Terry Fox

CKGW was a radio station owned and operated by distiller Gooderham and Worts, that broadcast from the King Edward hotel in the 1920s and 1930s.

CKGW: Canada’s Cheerio Station

A celebration of the 125th anniversary of Toronto Public Health through photographs and documents from the city’s and predecessor municipalities’ health departments.

An Infectious Idea: 125 Years of Public Health in Toronto

Watercolour and charcoal drawings depicting the construction of the Yonge Street subway line.

Drawings from the Underground: The Subway Art of John DeRinzy

An introduction to the history and records of the Alumnae Association of the School of Nursing, Toronto General Hospital, 1894–2010.

That I May Be of Service – The Alumnae Association of the School of Nurses

As part of the city’s 175th anniversary celebration, this special exhibit looked at what Toronto was like in 1834.

Toronto in 1834

Taken between 1945 and 1993, Wiley’s early colour images tell the story of an evolving city.

Ellis Wiley Fonds

This exhibit highlights some of the extensive architectural records housed at the Archives, from the 1840s to the present day.

A Work in Progress

Images from the Etobicoke Clerk’s Department from the late 1950s to the early 1960s.

Etobicoke: A Modern Suburb

25 rare photographs showing 1850s Toronto.

The Earliest Known Photographs of Toronto

The restoration of the Elgin and Winter Garden Theatres and other theatres.

Mandel Sprachman Fonds

A history of the construction and opening of City Hall and Nathan Phillips Square.

A Step Forward in Time: Toronto’s New City Hall

Learn about how Toronto celebrated V-E Day and V-J Day, the days that ended World War II.

V-E Day and V-J Day: The End of World War II in Toronto, 1945

See how World War II affected every Canadian civilian, every day.

Toronto Remembers the Home Front, 1939-1945

100 Years of Public Control Over Private Space.
A look at the influences that shaped the city’s neighbourhoods.

Your Home Our City

See how members of the military and Torontonians experienced this key assault in  World War II.

Toronto Remembers D-Day, June 6, 1944

Views of one of Toronto’s greatest disasters.

The Great Fire of 1904

View photographs by Peter MacCallum of the demolition of the Gardiner Expressway East from the City of Toronto Archives online.

The Gardiner Expressway East Comes Down

From groundbreaking in 1949 to grand opening in 1954.

Canada’s First Subway