On Wednesday, November 30, Spadina Museum is closed due to a planned power outage.

Spadina Museum has been reimagined for the immersive Dis/Mantle art exhibit. All tours focus on the art pieces in the exhibit and the stories and histories they present.

 

Spadina Museum, named from an Annishnaabemowin word ishpadina (“highland” or “ridge”), sits atop a ravine overlooking Toronto. Today this dazzling mansion is a portal into the triumphs and tribulations of Toronto from 1900 to the 1930s. Get a glimpse into this era through the perspective of the affluent Austin family and the people who worked in service within their home.

If the lush gardens, lavish furniture, and beautiful decor could talk, they would speak of a grand life of galas and garden parties, the pain of losing loved ones to sickness and war, the harsh reality of a servant’s life and the new technologies that completely transformed society during a time of great change. If the internet was a game changer, imagine being able to talk on the telephone for the first time ever.

The splendour of Spadina Museum is as much a feast for the eyes as it is an invitation to discuss how a city and its people adapted during an era of disruption and change.

Admission

Visiting the historic house is by guided tour only. See schedule below. General admission is free. Some exhibitions and events may carry a separate charge where noted.

Hours of Operation

Wednesday to Sunday: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Free Guided Tours

Wednesday to Friday tour times: 12:15 p.m., 1:15 p.m., 2:15 p.m. and 3 p.m.

Saturday and Sunday tour times: 11:15 p.m., 12:15 p.m., 1:15 p.m., 2:15 p.m. and 3 p.m.

COVID-19 Health and Safety Measures

As of March 21, 2022, Ontario has lifted provincial masking provisions for Museums and Heritage Services with the City of Toronto. In addition, the City’s mandatory mask by-law is no longer in effect. The general public is not required to wear a mask but may choose to wear a mask in any settings they wish and will be supported in doing so. Museum visitors are treated with respect and understanding, regardless of their decision to wear a mask.

On-site Services and Accessibility

  • The grounds at Spadina Museum are open Wednesday to Sunday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  • Spadina Museum and its grounds can be rented out for special occasions.
  • Paid parking next door at Casa Loma.
  • Partial accessibility, please contact the museum for full details.

Free Art Exhibition

Portrait of Louisa Pipkin
Detail of: Refashion (Mrs. Pipkin), oil on wood panel, 2022 by Gordon Shadrach

Dis/Mantle, an art exhibit inspired by the efforts of Black abolitionists, reimagines Spadina Museum using an Afrofuturism narrative: where Mrs. Pipkin, the formerly enslaved freedom seeker who worked as a laundress in the house is now the homeowner and the house is a safe haven for those seeking freedom through the Underground Railroad. On view until December 31, the group show includes soundscapes, ceramics and visual art by Canadian artists from the Afro-Caribbean diaspora. Learn more.

By Transit

Yonge/University subway to Dupont subway station. Exit station and walk north to the Baldwin Steps at the intersection of Spadina Road and Davenport Road. Spadina Museum is located at the top of the Baldwin Steps next door to Casa Loma. For specific TTC route and schedule information call 416-393-4636 or visit the TTC website.

Please note, there is no parking available at Spadina Museum. Paid parking is available next door at Casa Loma (1 Austin Terrace) in the shared parking lot. Contact us if you require accessible parking.

Location

285 Spadina Road

For over a century, Spadina was home to three generations of the Austin family. In 1866, the property was purchased by businessman and financier James Austin, founder of the Dominion Bank and president of Consumers Gas. The Austins and their children used their 80 acres for farming until James, and later his son Albert, subdivided and sold most of the land. The remaining 5.7 acres include an orchard, a grape arbour and a kitchen garden, along with the more formal areas of lawn and display beds.

The historic house illustrates the evolution of styles from mid-Victorian to 1930s Colonial Revival and includes items from both the Arts and Crafts and Aesthetic Movements, as well as items in the Art Nouveau and Art Deco styles. The influence of new technologies such as gas lighting, central heating, electricity and the telephone can be seen here.