Time-ticketed HistoricTO walking tours are available at Mackenzie House. Book your tickets online.

 

Explore Toronto History Museums’ Artifact Collection featuring over one million archaeological specimens, art works and more.

Mackenzie House was the last home of Toronto’s first mayor, William Lyon Mackenzie, and is located downtown just steps from theatres, the Eaton Centre and Yonge-Dundas Square. The museum interprets urban Victorian life of the 1860s and the evolution of democratic institutions through the lens of Mackenzie as a writer, publisher, politician and rebel.

The site includes the original three-storey brick, Greek Revival row house (originally the centre of three row houses, built circa 1858), and a one-storey addition which houses a narrow gallery space, a recreated print shop  and reception/gift shop that was added by the City in 1967.

Visit Mackenzie House and view the changing character of the neighbourhood from Victorian row houses to modern condominiums at the heart of Canada’s largest city.

The interior of Mackenzie House is closed to the public. Please refer to the open hours below or call for more information.

Admission

Time-ticketed HistoricTO walking tours at Mackenzie House is pay-what-you-can, with a suggested donation of $10.

Hours of Operation

Wednesday to Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Buy your tickets online to book a time slot for your visit.

On-site Services

  • Parking: commercial lots nearby
  • Public washrooms
  • Special needs: Partial accessibility. Please call 416-392-6915 for specific accessibility questions

By Transit

Take the Yonge/University subway line to Dundas subway station, exit to surface and walk two blocks east to Bond Street. Or, take either the Dundas or Queen streetcar to Bond Street and walk south from Dundas Street East or north from Queen Street East. For specific TTC route and schedule information call 416-393-4636 (INFO) or visit the TTC website.

Location

82 Bond St.

This restored 1857 townhouse was the final home of William Lyon Mackenzie, Toronto’s first mayor and leader of the 1837 Rebellion. The site features furniture from the nineteenth century, an 1845 printing press and artifacts from its former print shop.

In 1936 when William Lyon Mackenzie King, Mackenzie’s grandson, was Prime Minister, the house was saved from demolition when its neighbouring row houses were destroyed.