Over the past 20 years, population and development in the Park Lawn Road and Lake Shore Boulevard area has grown, resulting in increased traffic congestion and limited options to connect to surrounding areas. During this time, the area transportation network has remained relatively unchanged, and improvements are needed to meet the needs of pedestrians, cyclists, transit users, vehicles, trucks, and development both now and in the future.

The Transportation Master Plan (TMP) will provide the first step in a multi-year process to evaluate solutions to create more transportation options in the Park Lawn Lake Shore area, including:

  • new connections and better access to roads, transit, and pathways
  • additional safe and convenient crossings of physical barriers
  • planning for investment in public transit, pedestrian, and cycling networks
  • high-quality streetscape design

The Park Lawn Lake Shore Transportation Master Plan (TMP) is a critical first step towards long-term transportation improvements in the Park Lawn Lake Shore area. It will build upon past studies, marking an important advancement in the required municipal planning process towards permanent upgrades to the transportation network, and recommend long-term solutions to keep this community moving.

Area Studies

Ongoing

  • Waterfront Reset: a vision and strategy for implementation and integration of a continuous waterfront transit network that serves communities from Long Branch to Woodbine Avenue.
  • Humber Bay Parks Project: Master Plan for parks and trails and provides a creative vision for a major park on Toronto’s waterfront.

Past

  • Humber Trail: upgrades to accommodate increased popularity of the trail and improved connections to Marine Parade and Waterfront Drive.
  • Mr. Christies Working Group: a vision to guide future land use for 2150 Lake Shore Blvd. W. and 23 Park Lawn Rd. to encourage transformative employment opportunities.
  • Mimico 20/20 Revitalization Action Plan: a vision and action plan for revitalizing the Mimico-By-The-Lake Community through the development of a planning and development framework to address land use, rental housing, density, infrastructure, design and open space. This includes the creation of a transit supportive community that is balanced and connected to all forms of movement, with appropriate service to and through Lake Shore communities.
  • Mimico Judson Secondary Plan and Urban Design Guidelines: framework for continued and expanded employment opportunities and targeted residential uses.
  • Mimico Judson Regeneration Areas Study: redesignation of land near the Mimico GO Station as a Regeneration Area to establish a revitalization framework to accommodate employment and residential population growth.
  • Humber Bay Shores Precinct Plan: In 2008, City Council required the completion of a Landowners Precinct Plan to ensure coordinated road networks, streets and blocks, servicing and grading for the study area identified within Humber Bay Shores. Completion of the Precinct Plan was one of the requirements prior to the lifting of the Holding Provisions By-law in place for Humber Bay Shores.
  • Humber Bay Shores Traffic Impact Study: One of the key supporting documents of the Humber Bay Shores Precinct Plan, this Traffic Impact Study examines the future impact of development generated traffic on local area intersections. This study was commissioned by the Humber Bay Shores landowners group and a final report was issued in November 2009 with a subsequent updated report issued in October 2013.

The primary Study Area for the Park Lawn Lake Share Master Plan is focused in the area between Ellis Avenue, Park Lawn Road, The Queensway, and Lake Ontario, and accounts for movement through this area coming from both east and west.

Map of the study area in Etobicoke
Map of Study Area

Click on the links below to learn more about the Wards included in the Study Area.

Background

1. What is a Transportation Master Plan?

A Transportation Master Plan (TMP) is a study that examines infrastructure needs within a geographic area and provides a framework for the implementation of projects over a period of time.

The Park Lawn Lake Shore Transportation Master Plan Study will follow Phases 1 and 2 of the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment MCEA process, which is an approved planning process under the Environmental Assessment Act.

  • Phase 1: identify transportation problems and opportunities in the Park Lawn Lake Shore area.
  • Phase 2: develop, evaluate and recommend alternatives to address the identified problems and opportunities.

The TMP Study process includes identifying the problems and opportunities to be addressed, developing and evaluating a range of alternative solutions, and providing opportunities for public input. Once completed, the Study will recommend a series of transportation projects, initiatives, and policies to support the Park Lawn Lake Shore area. Depending on the scale of projects identified, some will require further study continuing additional Environmental Assessment (EA) phases under the MCEA.

2. What is a Class Environmental Assessment?

A Class Environmental Assessment (commonly known as a Class EA) is a study required by the Ontario Ministry of Environment and Climate Change (MOECC) to assess the potential positive or negative effects of an individual project on the environment (i.e., social, cultural, natural, technical and economic environment).

Key components of a Class EA include:

  • consultation with government agencies, First Nations and the public
  • consideration and evaluation of alternatives
  • management of potential environmental effects

The EA regulates the planning and decision-making process so that potential environmental effects are considered before infrastructure projects begin. Within an EA, Transportation Master Plans examine strategic long-term infrastructure needs and set the framework for subsequent projects.The Transportation Master Plan includes identifying the problem and opportunities, developing and evaluating a range of alternative solutions, and providing opportunities for public input.

The Environmental Assessment Act dictates that the City must hold two public meetings during development of a Transportation Maser Plan. Due to the scale and complexity of transportation projects in the Park Lawn Lake Shore Area, the City will be holding three public meetings during the planning process.

Once completed, the TMP will recommend a series of transportation projects, initiatives and policies to support the Park Lawn Lake Shore Area. Depending on the scale of projects identified, some will require further study continuing additional phases in the Environmental Assessment.

3. What is the purpose of this Study?

The TMP Study will provide the first step in a multi-year process to evaluate solutions that create more transportation options in the Park Lawn Lake Shore area. The Study is looking at:

  • new connections and better access to roads, transit, and pathways
  • additional safe and convenient crossings of physical barriers
  • planning for investment in public transit, pedestrian, and cycling networks
  • high-quality streetscape design

Once completed, the Study will recommend a series of transportation projects, initiatives and policies to support the Park Lawn Lake Shore Area. Depending on the scale of projects identified, some will require further study continuing additional EA phases under the MCEA.

4. Why is this Study taking place now? How was it initiated?

Over the past 20 years population and development in the Park Lawn Road and Lake Shore Boulevard area has increased, resulting in increased traffic congestion and limited options to connect to surrounding areas. During this time, the area transportation network has remained relatively unchanged, and improvements are needed to meet the needs of pedestrians, cyclists, transit users, vehicles, trucks, and development both now and in the future.

In response to these challenges, City Council directed Transportation Services, in consultation with the Chief Planner and Executive Director, to report to the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee on the scope, timing, and costs of undertaking a Transportation Master Plan for the Park Lawn and Lake Shore area. Transportation Services in consultation with the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning, reported back in August 2013 on the costs and scope of the Study.

5. What are the boundaries of the Study Area?

The primary TMP Study Area for the Park Lawn Lake Share Master Plan is focused in the area between Ellis Avenue, Park Lawn Road, The Queensway, and Lake Ontario, and accounts for movement through this area.

6. How long will the Study take to complete?

The Transportation Master Plan is expected to be completed in late 2017.

7. How has population grown in the Study Area?

Over the past 10 years, approximately 3,000 residential units have been constructed in the Study Area. An additional 9,000 or more residential units are currently proposed, approved, under construction or recently occupied.

Development within the Humber Bay Shores area is guided by the City’s Official Plan Policies and specifically the Motel Strip Secondary Plan which permits specified land uses and densities.

City Council and the Ontario Municipal Board approve development applications in Humber Bay Shores area. These approvals are legally binding and provide the necessary permissions to apply and obtain a building permit, and will continue to proceed under legal agreements that are already in place.  Any new development applications that are received by the City, will be based on their own merits and will go through an extensive review process.

The Park Lawn Lake Shore Transportation Master Plan (TMP) Study is using development growth forecasts to account for various population and employment scenarios that will inform the City’s decision-making around both the TMP and future development.

8. When could new infrastructure improvements be built?

This TMP Study will take a phased approach to infrastructure improvements. There are many ongoing studies and initiatives that could affect the Park Lawn Lake Shore area, including Waterfront Transit Reset and Metrolinx RER GO Transit Station planning.

Once the TMP Study is complete, decisions will be made about how its recommendations can be implemented. Some of the proposed works will be easier to implement than others. For example, turn lane improvements and signal optimization could be pursued shortly after the Study completion. Larger works, like new road connections and bridges will require completion of the full EA study process before proceeding to design and construction.

Study Process

9. Why is the Study following the Transportation Master Plan process?

As part of its 2013 report to the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee, Transportation Services determined that it is appropriate to follow the TMP process, to study the ultimate needs and directions for transportation planning in the Park Lawn Lake Shore area. The TMP Study will provide a rational basis for recommending transportation projects to move forward, and identify what further planning, design and approvals are needed.

Following the TMP, some projects may not need any further study, some may be carried out by or in partnership with developers, some will require modification to previous Study reports, and some will need to be studied further through Phases 3 and 4 of the MCEA process.

10. What happens when the Study is complete?

Once the TMP Study is complete, a report will be issued identifying recommendations. If City Council adopts the report recommendations, a Notice of Study Completion is issued to all stakeholders and the project mailing list and a copy of the Transportation Master Plan document is made available on our website and in select local libraries for a 30-day review period.

During the 30-day review period, a person can contact the City to resolve any outstanding concerns regarding the project.

Some of the potential projects which may be recommended in the TMP with a higher cost and environmental impact will require further study and completion of Phases 3 and 4 of the Municipal Class EA process at a later date.

11. Where is the funding for the Study and implementation of projects coming from?

The TMP Study is being funded through the Transportation Services Capital Budget. Once the Study is completed, funding for implementation of future studies will be requested through the City’s future Capital Budgets.

12. Will property acquisition be necessary?

Some of the recommended projects may require property acquisition. The TMP Study will perform an initial assessment of where property may be required to achieve the required public infrastructure to allow for the approved plan to be implemented. Property requirements will be confirmed during detailed design activities that will follow this Study. Some property acquisition may be realized through the development approval process. The City will consult with affected property owners and negotiate property acquisition prior to construction.

13. What is involved in the archaeological assessment?

The Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (MCEA) process requires the City to consider the potential to impact different aspects of the environment (e.g., natural, social, cultural, etc.) when developing and evaluating alternatives. The potential to impact archaeological resources is one of the key considerations when assessing alternatives during a MCEA.

Under the Ontario Heritage Act, Archaeological Assessments (AAs) are required when land that is known to have an archaeological site on it, or has the potential to contain archaeological resources, may be impacted by development activities. There are four (4) different stages to archaeological assessment, but not all stages are necessary for all undertakings.  A Stage 1 AA includes a review of geographic, land use and historical information, review of existing conditions, and contact with the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport (MTCS) to determine whether there are any known archaeological sites in the area.  A Stage 1 AA has been completed for the Park Lawn/Lake Shore TMP study area to determine whether there is potential for archaeological sites to be present, and to inform the evaluation of alternatives.

A Stage 2 AA is required when areas of archaeological potential are identified during the Stage 1AA. A field survey of the land is conducted to confirm or refute the presence of archaeological resources and help determine whether any archaeological resources found are of significant cultural heritage value and require further assessment (i.e. Stage 3 AA). Significant archaeological resources are to be avoided, where possible.

Public Consultation

14. How can I get involved in the Study?

Public consultation is an important part of this Study and there are many ways you can get involved.

  • Submit comments and ask questions via phone, email, or in writing. All correspondence received will be reviewed, recorded in the official project record, and responded to by the project team.
  • Attend a public event, speak with City staff, or join a table discussion
  • Sign up to receive email updates

Your public consultation contact for this Study is:

Robyn Shyllit
Senior Public Consultation Coordinator
rshyllit@toronto.ca
416-392-3358

Public Consultation Unit
City of Toronto
Metro Hall
55 John St., 19th Floor
Toronto, ON M5V 3C7

15. What are the public consultation events?

The Environmental Assessment Act dictates that the City must hold two public consultation events during the development of a Transportation Master Plan. Due to the scale and complexity of transportation in the Park Lawn Lake Shore Area, the City will hold three public events.

The first round of public events will be scheduled at two different times and dates in South Etobicoke with the same content and format presented at each event, to allow participants to choose the date and time that is most convenient. The format for the events will include open house displays, time to review information about the project and speak with City Staff, and may also include a presentation and table discussions. All materials presented at public events will be posted to the project website.

The approximate schedule for public consultation events is outlined below:

Topic Timing
Public Event 1 Introduce Study and identify issues and opportunities in the Study Area. Fall 2016
Public Event 2 Review alternative solutions and evaluation criteria. 2018
Public Event 3 Review results of the evaluation process 2018

 

16. How will I be notified of public events? How are event locations selected?

  • Advertisement in Etobicoke South Guardian and Bloor West Villager.
  • Flyer delivery to residents and businesses in the Study Area.
  • Email updates to individuals on the project email list.
  • Email to local residents organizations, community groups, and businesses.

Sign up for email updates.

In choosing locations to host public events, the City seeks venues that are within or as close to the study area as possible that meet the accessibility, availability, equipment, and capacity requirements.

17. What efforts are being made to work with local organizations, groups, and businesses?

In addition to public events that are open for everyone to attend, the City will meet with local residents groups and businesses during the Study process in group discussions, and some individual meetings.

We acknowledge that there are a high number of resident groups and community organizations in the Park Lawn Lake Shore area and will work to ensure these organizations are involved in the Study. Given staff capacity and available resources, individual meetings are not possible, and group meetings will be held to convene various representatives.

18. Who are you consulting with?

During the Transportation Master Plan, the City will consult with a number of groups and agencies.

  • Residents
  • Community Groups
  • Resident and Ratepayer Associations
  • Non-profits Organizations
  • Local Businesses and Business Improvement Areas
  • Councillors
  • Property Owners
  • Metrolinx
  • First Nations
  • AECOM (lead study consultant)
  • Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change (MOECC)
  • City of Toronto (TTC, Public Realm, Traffic Planning, Traffic Operations, Infrastructure Planning, Transportation Planning, Beautiful Streets Program, City Planning and Urban Design, Cycling Infrastructure and Programs, Water and Waste Water Divisions)

Accessibility

19. What is the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA)?

The Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) was enacted by the Provincial government in 2005 to help make Ontario accessible to people with disabilities. The Act lays the framework for the development of province-wide mandatory standards on accessibility in all areas of daily life.

20. Will Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) and Complete Streets apply to this Transportation Master Plan?

The City of Toronto’s new Complete Streets Guidelines will be completed by the end of 2016. The Guidelines consider the needs of all users, such as people who walk, bicycle, take transit or drive, and people of varying ages and levels of ability. While not every type of use or user may be accommodated on every street, the goal is to build a city with a well-functioning street network that supports and sustains our quality of life. Complete streets ensure that social, economic and environmental priorities are integrated in street planning and design, and the Guidelines were developed through extensive consultation with stakeholder groups across Toronto. View the Complete Streets Stakeholder Advisory Group list.

During the evaluation of alternative solutions in Phase 2, criteria will be established to assess social, cultural, environmental, and economic impacts, including impacts to accessibility.

Conceptual and functional designs for new or upgraded infrastructure (e.g. sidewalks) that are developed as part of this project will be AODA compliant (where applicable). In future design stages occurring after the Study, all new or upgraded infrastructure components (e.g. curb ramps or depressed curbs, tactile walking surface indicators, accessible pedestrian signals / push buttons, signage, etc.) implemented by the City of Toronto will comply with AODA standards.

All public events held during the consultation period will take place at accessible venues and are open to anyone to attend. Notification for public events is distributed to all residents and businesses in the study area, and published to local community newspapers. Additionally, the Project Team undertakes outreach to local community organizations and non-profit groups to invite participation in the Study.

If you, or someone you know, requires additional accommodation to attend public events or assistance to review any files related to this Study, please email or contact Robyn Shyllit at 416-392-3358.

Traffic & Vehicle Movement

21. How is traffic being measured in the Study area?

Field surveys were undertaken in early Fall 2016 to collect vehicular turning movement count volumes and pedestrian/cyclist volumes during the morning and evening peak rush hours at intersections within the Study Area. In addition, 24-hour bidirectional traffic volume data was collected at selected locations within the Study Area. An origin-destination (O-D) survey was conducted using Bluetooth traffic monitoring units; this survey will help to determine travel patterns of trips that pass through the Study Area and the associated travel time between multiple points of entry and exit. Available data from the Transportation Tomorrow Survey (TTS) will also be used.

The new traffic counts and the Bluetooth survey were conducted in tandem in an effort to use up-to-date information that recognizes that conditions on the Gardiner Expressway had normalized following the completion of rehabilitation work, as of June 2016. Old counts and traffic studies were not used.

22. What short-term improvements can improve traffic? What’s been done already?

At the intersection of Park Lawn Road and Lake Shore Boulevard, the road was widened to accommodate an additional lane north of Lake Shore Boulevard West. Recently, more green signal time has been given for northbound motorists on Park Lawn Road who are turning left onto the Gardiner (westbound) during the morning peak period. A signal coordination review is being conducted along Lake Shore Boulevard West to determine the optimum timing to improve traffic flow on this street.

City Staff reported on a left-turn issue to improve safety concerns at 2200-2220 Lake Shore Boulevard West, which was approved at the Etobicoke York Community Council in December 2016. Installation/implementation is expected in early 2017.

23. What is the status of the Legion Road extension?

The City of Toronto completed an EA to extend Legion Road across the rail corridor to the north. Subject to available funding, detail design of the road extension is anticipated to be completed in 2017/18.

24. What are the opportunities to improve the road network?

Opportunities to improve the road network could include:

  • new connections and better access to roads, transit, and pathways
  • additional safe and convenient crossings of physical barriers
  • planning for investment in public transit, pedestrian, and cycling networks
  • high-quality streetscape design

25. How will information about potential road tolls be incorporated into the TMP?

In September 2015, Executive Committee directed Transportation Services to undertake a detailed study on options for tolling and pricing of the Gardiner Expressway and Don Valley Parkway.

The report, “The City of Toronto’s Immediate and Longer-Term Revenue Strategy Direction,” from the City Manager and Deputy City Manager & Chief Financial Officer, was presented at the December 1, 2016 Executive Committee meeting.

In January 2017, the Province of Ontario withdrew support for proposed road tolls in Toronto. In light of this decision, the City is no longer studying the impact of road tolls on the Park Lawn Lake Shore TMP. Transportation Services is aware of area resident concerns about the impacts that road tolling could have on local traffic in the Park Lawn and Lake Shore study area.

Public Transportation

26. What are the potential improvements for public transportation?

  • Optimizing signal timing to move transit vehicles more efficiently.
  • New/additional roads and connections that could allow transit service to better serve existing and new developments.
  • Options for new transportation infrastructure on the site formerly known as the Mr. Christie’s site.
  • Investigate the feasibility of a new GO Station.
  • Options to improve the existing Humber Loop or provide a new loop in an alternate location.
  • Widen Lake Shore Boulevard between Humber Loop and Park Lawn Road, and construct the previously-approved streetcar right-of-way on this road section.

27. How has public transportation changed with population growth in the Study Area?

TTC regularly monitors ridership on transit services across the city, and makes service adjustments as necessary and as budget allows.

66 Prince Edward bus route

  • In the morning peak period, service was increased from every eight to nine minutes to every seven minutes in January 2014, and from every seven minutes to every six minutes in February 2016.
  • In the afternoon peak period, service was increased from every ten minutes to every seven to eight minutes in January 2014, and from every seven to eight minutes to every six minutes in February 2016.

501 Queen streetcar route

  • Service on the 501 Queen route has been scheduled every ten minutes or better, all day, every day on Lake Shore Boulevard starting in January 2016, as part of the TTC’s Ten Minutes or Better Network. This represents a significant increase in service particularly to the section of Lake Shore Boulevard West, west of Humber Loop. This service increase is currently being achieved by splitting the 501 Queen at Humber Loop due to a lack of available streetcars in the fleet. Once sufficient new streetcars have been received, the 501 Queen “through” service will be reinstated at 10 minute or better frequency all day, every day, all the way to Long Branch.

Additional improvements

  • Earlier Sunday bus service added on a number of routes in South Etobicoke (and across the city) to connect with the earlier Sunday subway service.
  • Schedule adjustments to 77 Swansea, all days of the week, to improve service reliability.
  • New 188 Kipling South Rocket service added from 7 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. between Kipling Station and Lake Shore, with service every 7 to 8 minutes.
  • Peak period service increased on 123 Shorncliffe in February 2016.
  • New 315 Evans-Brown’s Line overnight service added in 2015.

28.  What is the Waterfront Reset and how will the Waterfront Reset be coordinated with this project?

The City of Toronto, in partnership with the TTC and Waterfront Toronto is undertaking a Waterfront Transit “Reset” study. The study will involve a comprehensive review of existing and planned waterfront transit, and will clearly articulate the opportunities and options that exist to realize an integrated and continuous waterfront transit network. The Waterfront Transit Reset Study Area extends from the Long Branch GO Station and the Mississauga border in the west to Woodbine Avenue in the east, and south of the Queensway/Queen Street corridor to Lake Ontario.

The Waterfront Reset and Park Lawn Lake Shore TMP Study are being conducted simultaneously, and the two project teams are in contact on a regular basis to ensure full co-ordination.  In addition, public consultation contact lists for the two studies have been coordinated to ensure that communication with the various residents’ groups, community organizations and business interests in South Etobicoke are maintained for both studies.

Click here to read the 2015 Council Report directing the Waterfront Reset Study.

29. How will this Study impact the existing Mimico GO Station or a new GO Station at Park Lawn?

As part of Metrolinx’s 10-Year GO/RER plan, Metrolinx carried out a detailed assessment of potential locations for future stations, including a potential station at Park Lawn. Based on Metrolinx’s assessment, the Park Lawn station was evaluated to have high market and development potential, medium policy alignment, affordability and ease of construction, and low connectivity, ridership, travel time savings and construction affordability. Key concerns with a station at this location include substandard spacing with the existing Mimico GO station.

Although Metrolinx’s 10 year GO/RER plan did not include a station at Park Lawn and Lake Shore, the Study will investigate the elements that are needed to protect for a future GO Station to service the Park Lawn Lake Shore area in the post-10 year planning horizonThis work will be co-ordinated with Metrolinx to determine feasible locations for a new station and potential impacts on the existing Mimico GO Station.

Learn more about Metrolinx’s Regional Planning.

Active Transportation

30. What are the potential enhancements for cycling?

Enhancements could include improvements and additions to the on-street cycling infrastructure  like bike lanes, cycle tracks, multi-use trails, way finding and bike parking.

31. What are the potential enhancements for pedestrians?

Enhancements could include adding missing sidewalks, widening too-narrow sidewalks, improving intersections and pedestrian crossings, enhancing accessibility, improving signals, wayfinding, and adding other amenities such as trees and street furniture to improve pedestrian comfort.

32. Why is active transportation in the Park Lawn/Lake Shore area important?

The more people can walk or cycle safely and conveniently to their destinations, the more likely people are to use these modes of travel – thus reducing congestion and improving the health and wellbeing of community members. Creating a safe, accessible, and connected active transportation system improves the ability of residents to travel to where they need to go.

Land Use

33. What are the permitted land uses of the Mr.Christie’s site (2150 Lake Shore Blvd.)?

The site is designated as Employment Lands under the City’s Official Plan. The site is zoned I.C1 (Industrial Class 1) in the former City of Etobicoke Zoning Code. The I.C1 zone allows for a variety of industrial uses including manufacturing, offices, hotels, convention centres, restaurants, banks, vehicle related uses, schools, government buildings, medical office/ clinic, hospital, commercial/recreational facilities.

34. What is the Mr. Christie’s Site Working Group?

Following direction from City Council, the Mr. Christie’s Site Working Group was convened for three meetings in 2013. The group used a consensus-based approach to generate a vision statement and guiding principles to inform the redevelopment of the Mr. Christie’s site. The results of the meetings are available online.

35. Are there opportunities to work with the owners of large properties to plan new transportation connections?

Property owners at 125 The Queensway (Sobey’s Plaza), 165 The Queensway (Ontario Food Terminal) and 2150 Lake Shore Boulevard West (former Christie’s site) will be engaged by the City to discuss how new transportation infrastructure may impact these properties.

You’ve probably noticed that Toronto is growing. Some neighbourhoods have grown faster than others and are in need of more transportation options for everyone. In some cases, this means improving an existing route by adding a turning lane, new cycling facilities, or changing the timing of traffic lights. In others, it could mean a completely new road, planning for additional public transit, or new street benches and trees. Whatever the options are, the City must follow provincial planning processes and consult with you along the way.

We invite you to join us in helping shape the future of transportation options in the Park Lawn Lake Shore community.

Sign up for email updates

Stay up to date on key study milestones and opportunities to get involved. Your contact information will be kept private, and will only be used to share information about the Park Lawn Lake Shore Transportation Master Plan. Sign up to receive email updates.

Attend an event in-person

There will be three public events at key study milestones where you can come out and learn more about the Study, speak with City staff, and discuss questions and concerns in person. Events will be held within or as close to the Park Lawn Lake Shore study area as possible, on weekday evenings or weekends at accessible locations. The first round of public events took place on November 24 and December 3 2016. Scroll down to view presentation materials and information presented at these meetings.The next public events will take place in 2018.

By email, phone, mail, or online feedback form

Send an email or give us a call to submit comments and ask questions. All information received will be responded to, recorded, and reviewed by the project team. At different points in the Study, online comment forms will be available to collect responses on key issues.

Make a deputation

Once the study is complete, it will be presented to the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee (PWIC). At this stage, you can arrange to submit comments to PWIC or make a deputation in person.

Public Events

Information on public events will be posted here including meeting notices, presentation and display materials, comment forms, and summary reports.

Reports

Phase 1 Consultation Report

Community Workshop 1 – November 24 and December 3, 2016

Stakeholder Consultation

On October 5, 2016, local stakeholder organizations, including residents groups, community associations, non-profit organizations and Business Improvement Areas in the Park Lawn Lake Shore area were invited to meet with the Project Team, learn about the Study, share information, and discuss potential transportation improvements.

To request assistance reading these files, please email or contact Robyn Shyllit at 416-392-3358.